Sprite Slam Dunk Contest

Jeremy Evans wins 2012 Slam Dunk Contest

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Jeremy Evans of the Utah Jazz was a late addition to the 2012 Sprite Slam Dunk contest, only getting in after the Knicks’ Iman Shumpert bowed out due to injury. But he made the most of it, and the best of his three dunks — a leap over a seated Gordon Hayward, who threw two balls into the air for Evans to catch and throw down — was good enough to get the fans’ vote as this year’s champion.

In a year where skits, props, and painfully scripted slam dunks were on the agenda, this one from Evans was both athletic and sincere. He deserved to win it based on this one alone, especially considering some of the other strained attempts at entertainment that took place at the Amway Center on All-Star Saturday night.

Chase Budinger channeled his inner Woody Harrelson for some reason, and imitated (very loosely) the Billy Hoyle charachter from the movie White Men Can’t Jump. He wore a backwards snapback Rockets baseball cap and a white t-shirt, and then threw down a one-handed jam while jumping over … P. Diddy.

Yeah, I don’t know, either.

Budinger also brought out Cedric Ceballos, who won the event 20 years ago by dunking the ball while “blindfolded.” Technically, yes, there was a blindfold on Ced, but no one believes he couldn’t see through it. Same with Budinger, despite him intentionally missing his first blindfolded attempt badly by pretending he couldn’t see. How do we know that he could? Well, his second attempt was flawless — a reverse jam that went off without a hitch.

Derrick Williams rode in on the back of a motorcycle driven by the T’Wolves mascot while “California Love” blared over the sound system, then jumped over the motorcycle as it was parked in the paint for a not-that-exciting finish. Williams did have maybe the second-best, least-gimmicky dunk of the night though, enlisting teammate Ricky Rubio to throw one off the side of the backboard for him to catch and flush.

Paul George had the night’s biggest gimmick — a glow-in-the-dark throwdown, where the lights in the arena were turned out, his uniform and ball glowed (a little), and George did a spinning, 360-degree windmill that might have been the night’s most impressive — minus the schtick of course, and had we been able to see it.

The dunk contest has devolved greatly into an event that even the NBA diehards won’t buy into anymore; the jokes on Twitter ripping it to shreds were about 100 times more entertaining than the contest itself has become. There’s too much forced silliness planned, too many props and gimmicks, and an overall lack of creativity that’s really taken away from what it started out to be — a showcase of the grace and athleticism that basketball’s greatest athletes have to offer.

The only way for the league to save the dunk contest and turn things around is to enlist its biggest stars — yes, we’re looking at you, LeBron — and rule out the scripted nonsense. The dunks we remember as legendary are ones from the likes of Michael Jordan, Dominique Wilkins, and Vince Carter, and none of them involved blindfolds, motorcycles, mascots, or — shout out to Orlando’s Dwight Howard — Superman capes.

We’ll remember this contest as the lowest point that the event has reached in recent years. We’ll also remember it for Evans, though, whose two-ball dunk over Hayward was indeed pretty sweet.

Kevin Durant: Playing Thunder ‘never going to be a regular game for me’

OAKLAND, CA - NOVEMBER 03: Kevin Durant #35 of the Golden State Warriors is guarded by Russell Westbrook #0 of the Oklahoma City Thunder at ORACLE Arena on November 3, 2016 in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant‘s first game against the Thunder featured a clever Russell Westbrook costume, emotion-laden dunks and Enes Kanter trash talk.

Durant isn’t hiding from the meaningfulness of the sequel.

Durant, via Chris Haynes of ESPN:

“It’s never going to be a regular game for me,” Durant told ESPN in advance of his second go-around with OKC. “I’m just going to play. There’s nothing serious. We got the first one out the way, and we’re just going to play the next game.”

“I’m sure it will [be emotional],” Durant said. “It’s people I’ve been with for so long and to see them again, yeah, they’ll be some emotions. But I’ve still got a job to do.”

This game will always spark both nostalgia and competiveness. It’s a lot to process while playing elite basketball.

We’ll see whether Durant, who lit up the overmatched Thunder earlier this season, is up to the challenge.

Correction: This post has been updated to reflect the game’s location.

Report: Knicks grumbling about Jeff Hornacek’s lineups and rotations

DENVER, CO - DECEMBER 17: Head coach Jeff Hornacek of the New York Knicks watches as his team plays the Denver Nuggets at the Pepsi Center on December 17, 2016 in Denver, Colorado. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that , by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
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Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek has seemingly steered clear of the Phil Jackson-Carmelo Anthony feud. Hornacek has even avoided Jackson, one of the greatest coaches of all time, overly interfering.

But Hornacek hasn’t sidestepped every fissure in New York.

Veteran Knicks are reportedly frustrated with the defensive scheme, though some of that resentment could be pinned on assistant coach Kurt Rambis. Derrick Rose has reportedly been increasingly frustrated with Hornacek. And apparently he’s not the only one.

Ian Begley of ESPN:

Privately, players have been grumbling about lineups and rotations during the recent losing skid, according to sources. Brandon Jennings hinted at this after Monday’s loss when he spoke with frustration about the inconsistent nature of the Knicks’ recent lineups.

“Every day is something new. So just got to be ready I guess. You never know when you’re going to play,” he said.

Jennings was asked if the inconsistent rotations make things difficult for players.

“Yeah, when you come in here you don’t really know what’s going to happen, so it’s kind of no consistency and it’s really tough right now,” he said. “Right now, you come in here you don’t know what’s going to happen. I’m struggling. It’s difficult for me, because I don’t really know what’s going on. Just take it one day at a time.”

Jennings isn’t the only player expressing dissatisfaction beyond anonymous leaks.

According to Marc Berman of the New York Post, Rose and Hornacek yelled at each other after Rose – who called on Hornacek to coach defense harder – got beat by Dennis Schroder on this play:

Berman reports Kyle O'Quinn also glared at Hornacek after being subbed out during the Knicks’ loss to the Hawks.

After the game, Courtney Lee – whom Hornacek removed the starting lineup – posted and deleted photos of Dumb & Dumber on Instagram. Lee then followed with this caption:

I posted a pic of dumb n dumber cuz that was my mood, no jab at no1. It’s dumb that we have a talented team and we’re in position to win games n keep losing by 1 possession. We’ll figure it out collectively as a team but that was my mood after the game. Has nothing to with any change, rotation, system, players, coaches, so let that be clear.

Are we reading too much into vague social media postings and distant body language? That is a real risk.

But Hornacek still appears to have issues with these Knicks. The debate should be a matter of the depth of the problems, not whether they exist.

This is what happens when teams lose 11 of 13. Players get frustrated and grumble.

The coach also often adjusts the rotation, which Hornacek has done, including starting Ron Baker. Jennings and co. haven’t earned stability in their roles. When they had that, they were losing.

The question now: Can Hornacek reclaim the players’ trust, which would help the team break its skid? Or does the griping – and, partially as a result, the losing – continue in a season-destroying snowball?

PBT Extra: Carmelo Anthony/Phil Jackson rift just adds to Knicks stagnation

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Carmelo Anthony and Phil Jackson had a chilly talk, and Anthony told Jackson the star forward wants to stay in New York. Which, based on the mind games we’re seeing, is not what Jackson wants — although you get the feeling Jackson wants to move Anthony to bring in more stop-gap, win now pieces rather than try to build a future around Kristaps Porzingis.

Which all speaks to why the Knicks have made the playoffs just three times in 13 years. What is the Knicks long-term plan?

I discuss it all in this latest PBT Extra. Well, except the long-term plan because nobody knows what that is.

Rajon Rondo strangely runs behind Rick Carlisle during play (video)

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This would be ignored – still odd, but ignored – if it weren’t for their history.

But Rajon Rondo running behind Rick Carlisle during the Mavericks’ win over the Bulls raised a couple eyebrows in curiosity and drew a few chuckles. What was Rondo doing?

At least Carlisle explained why he didn’t call timeout before Wesley Matthewsgame-winning 3-pointer. The Dallas coach had Rondo in mind.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune: