Jeremy Evans wins 2012 Slam Dunk Contest

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Jeremy Evans of the Utah Jazz was a late addition to the 2012 Sprite Slam Dunk contest, only getting in after the Knicks’ Iman Shumpert bowed out due to injury. But he made the most of it, and the best of his three dunks — a leap over a seated Gordon Hayward, who threw two balls into the air for Evans to catch and throw down — was good enough to get the fans’ vote as this year’s champion.

In a year where skits, props, and painfully scripted slam dunks were on the agenda, this one from Evans was both athletic and sincere. He deserved to win it based on this one alone, especially considering some of the other strained attempts at entertainment that took place at the Amway Center on All-Star Saturday night.

Chase Budinger channeled his inner Woody Harrelson for some reason, and imitated (very loosely) the Billy Hoyle charachter from the movie White Men Can’t Jump. He wore a backwards snapback Rockets baseball cap and a white t-shirt, and then threw down a one-handed jam while jumping over … P. Diddy.

Yeah, I don’t know, either.

Budinger also brought out Cedric Ceballos, who won the event 20 years ago by dunking the ball while “blindfolded.” Technically, yes, there was a blindfold on Ced, but no one believes he couldn’t see through it. Same with Budinger, despite him intentionally missing his first blindfolded attempt badly by pretending he couldn’t see. How do we know that he could? Well, his second attempt was flawless — a reverse jam that went off without a hitch.

Derrick Williams rode in on the back of a motorcycle driven by the T’Wolves mascot while “California Love” blared over the sound system, then jumped over the motorcycle as it was parked in the paint for a not-that-exciting finish. Williams did have maybe the second-best, least-gimmicky dunk of the night though, enlisting teammate Ricky Rubio to throw one off the side of the backboard for him to catch and flush.

Paul George had the night’s biggest gimmick — a glow-in-the-dark throwdown, where the lights in the arena were turned out, his uniform and ball glowed (a little), and George did a spinning, 360-degree windmill that might have been the night’s most impressive — minus the schtick of course, and had we been able to see it.

The dunk contest has devolved greatly into an event that even the NBA diehards won’t buy into anymore; the jokes on Twitter ripping it to shreds were about 100 times more entertaining than the contest itself has become. There’s too much forced silliness planned, too many props and gimmicks, and an overall lack of creativity that’s really taken away from what it started out to be — a showcase of the grace and athleticism that basketball’s greatest athletes have to offer.

The only way for the league to save the dunk contest and turn things around is to enlist its biggest stars — yes, we’re looking at you, LeBron — and rule out the scripted nonsense. The dunks we remember as legendary are ones from the likes of Michael Jordan, Dominique Wilkins, and Vince Carter, and none of them involved blindfolds, motorcycles, mascots, or — shout out to Orlando’s Dwight Howard — Superman capes.

We’ll remember this contest as the lowest point that the event has reached in recent years. We’ll also remember it for Evans, though, whose two-ball dunk over Hayward was indeed pretty sweet.

Dwyane Wade says Bulls’ showers had no hot water in Boston

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The Bulls suffered a rough loss in Boston last night.

It didn’t get better afterward.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Celtics general manager Danny Ainge – who played for Boston in the 80s – pleaded ignorance to any nefarious plumbing:

I think the idea that teams plot to shut off the visitor’s hot water is often overstated. Arenas have complex infrastructure, and things can go wrong on their own. Sometimes, the home team loses hot water, but that never gets remembered.

But reasonable excuses don’t make a cold shower in the moment any more tolerable.

Robin Lopez pushes short floater over backboard (video)

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Robin Lopez had reason to be upset from the Bulls’ Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

This miss was all on him.

Dwyane Wade plays the laziest defense you’ll ever see (video)

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Dwyane Wade (26 points, 11 rebounds, eight assists) was the Bulls’ best player in their Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

But the 35-year-old guard clearly didn’t go all out on every possession.

Players can justify not closing out by claiming they were prioritizing rebounding position. Wade clearly has no such excuse.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.