Durant, Westbrook, Ibaka make history in Thunder win over Nuggets

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Numbers so rarely tell the story in retrospect. Every number based on human performance requires interpretation, it requires understanding. The idea that numbers are meaningless in the context of basketball is asinine, but the idea that in 20 years, some kid will check basketball reference and see the box score for the Thunder’s 124-118 win over the Nuggets, marvel at it, and never really understand its texture is a shame. Because it felt like Kevin Durant scored 100, not 51, that Russell Westbrook was every bit as dominant as Durant, though he wasn’t, and that Serge Ibaka rendered the Nuggets limb from limb when in reality his man defense was questionable as ever, his weakside as brilliant as always.

But us? We’re lucky to have been here to witness it. We witnessed history. Sunday night was the first time in NBA history a team has had a 50-point scorer, a 40-point scorer, and a triple double, all by three different players. It was historic, it was legendary, it was all completely necessary to get past the Nuggets.

– Kevin Durant scored 51 points on 28 shots, includig 5 of 6 from the arc and 9-10 from the stripe. Durant was at once aggressive in his assault on the rim and opportunistic, slipping in crevices to find open looks from mid and long-range. It is a career high for Durant and his highest since scoring 47 on 28 shots lat year against Minnesota. Down 2 at the end of regulation, Durant slipped off a screen, caught the inbounds and burst past Chris Anderson to the rim for a dunk to tie. In overtime, a Serge Ibaka offensive rebound was kicked out to Durant who calmly slipped back from transition to find the perimeter line. That’s the key with Durant. He worked out of such a wide variety of situations, he flowed seemlessly through the offense on his way to those 51. It is a pinnacle game in Durant’s career.

– Russell Westbrook dropped 40 points in a game, and yet was completely overshadowed. Westbrook had nine asssists, which will be completely overlooked and just two turnovers. but the perception will remain that Westbrook shoots too much. Do you know how few 40-point scorers there on this league? Westbroook repeatedly rose and daggered the Nuggets late. His ballhawking ways put constant pressure on the Nuggets and forced turnovers. Kevin Durant took 28 shots and Westbrook still found his way to assist or score on 58 points. The fact he is so underrated is criminal.

– Serge Ibaka finished with the first triple-double using blocks in franchise history, OKC or Seattle. He finished with 14 points, 15 rebounds, and 11 blocks. He ate up the Denver attacks at the rim, blocking and swatting and rejecting. It was his clutch offensive rebound and kickout to Kevin Durant in overtime that really cemented the game for OKC.

There is plenty to be concerned about beneath the surface for OKC. James Harden had a bad night. Kendrick Perkins does not seem like the defensive powerhouse he was brought in to be. The Thunder needed their two best players to score 91 points just to win a game, at home, against a depleted team, in overtime. But for a night, three players put the team on their shoulders and produced at a Herculean level. It was the stuff of legend.

Just another night in the NBA.

NBA fines Rockets owner Leslie Alexander $100,000 for confronting referee

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Rockets owner Leslie Alexander got up from his courtside seat, walked down the sideline and talked to referee Bill Kennedy during Houston’s Game 5 win over the Thunder.

It took less than a day for an investigation to yield the predictable result.

NBA release:

Houston Rockets owner Leslie Alexander has been fined $100,000 for confronting a referee during live game action, it was announced today by Byron Spruell, President, NBA League Operations.

The interaction occurred with 0:13 remaining in the first quarter of the Rockets’ 105-99 win over the Oklahoma City Thunder on April 25 at Toyota Center.

Per Patricia Bender’s database, this is the NBA’s largest fine in nearly two years. The NBA fined the Clippers $250,000 in 2015 for setting up DeAndre Jordan with an endorsement deal while trying to lure him back in free agency.

The NBA rightfully keeps owners on a tight leash. Unlike players, coaches and referees, who have their own unions, the league office represents the owners. So when one crosses the line – Alexander trampled over it – the hammer comes down hard. It’s an example to keep everyone else in line, and owners know they come out way ahead in this arrangement. Alexander might not like the punishment, but he benefits from owning a share of a league that so strongly dissuades such behavior.

David Stern: ‘Shame on the Brooklyn Nets’

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Brooklyn rested Brook Lopez, Jeremy Lin and Trevor Booker for its final game this season, which had huge playoff implications. Not for the Nets, of course. They were long eliminated from postseason contention.

But the Bulls beat Brooklyn to reach the playoffs over the Heat, who also won that night.

Miami fans were obviously ticked, and they have company in former NBA commissioner David Stern.

Stern, via Sam Amick of USA Today:

“I have no idea what was in the mind of the executives of the Brooklyn Nets — none — when they rested their starting players,” Stern, who still holds the title of Commissioner Emeritus, told USA TODAY Sports on Tuesday on the NBA A to Z podcast. “If you’re playing in a game of consequence, that has an impact, which is as good as it gets (you should play your players). Here we are, the Brooklyn Nets are out of the running. They have the lowest record in the sport. But they have an opportunity to weigh in on the final game with respect to Chicago. And they sit their starters? Really? It’s inexcusable in my view. I don’t think the Commissioner maybe can, or even should, do anything about it. But shame on the Brooklyn Nets. They broke the (pact with fans).”

The resting dilemma takes slightly different forms when it involves a team like Brooklyn rather than a certain playoff team, but the underlying conflict remains the same:

The team is better off resting its players.

The NBA is worse off, at least in the short term.

The league was robbed of an important competitive game that could’ve drawn higher ratings. The Nets had just beaten Chicago a days prior, but that was with major contributions from Lopez and Lin. Without them, Brooklyn had little chance and lost by 39.

The Nets weren’t playing for anything, not even a higher draft pick. They owe their first-rounder to the Celtics and already clinched the worst record anyway. Brooklyn was better off resting those veterans at the end of a long regular season.

There’s no easy answer. If the NBA bans resting, teams will sit players and assign to minor or made-up injuries. If the league shortens the season, it will lose revenue.

The best solution is to improve at the margins – provide more rest days (which the league will do next season) and schedule nationally televised games outside of grueling stretches of the schedule. That’s obviously no silver bullet, though. Bulls-Nets wasn’t nationally televised, and Brooklyn had the day off before and the entire offseason off after.

Another potential solution: Shaming teams into playing their top players. Stern is giving that one a go.

NBA looking into Rockets’ owner interacting with referee during game

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Like every Rockets fan — and, let’s be honest, every fan of every team — Leslie Alexander is convinced the referees were screwing over his Rockets.

Except that Alexander is the owner of the Rockets.

And he approached a referee during game play.

The NBA is understandably investigating this, as reported by the Houston Chronicle.

The NBA said an investigation “is underway” into Rockets’ owner Leslie Alexander’s getting up from his courtside seat to have a few words with official Bill Kennedy in the first half.

Alexander appeared to say something to Kennedy during a Thunder possession before returning to his seat. Alexander declined to give any detail beyond he was “upset … really upset.” Rockets guard James Harden said he didn’t see his owner get up. “He did that?” a surprised Harden said after the game. “He’s the coolest guy. I would have helped him.”

The NBA doesn’t let players or coaches cross a line when talking to officials, but they are at least allowed to interact and discuss calls with a ref during a game. It’s something else entirely for an owner to get in the ear of an official during game play.

I’d expect Alexander will see a fine for this.

Whatever he thought of the officiating, the Rockets won to advance on to the second round of the Western Conference playoffs.

Steve Kerr to see Stanford specialists about back issues, is optimistic about return to bench

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If he were not coaching a perennial contender and a team where he genuinely has a deep bond with the players, the GM, and his fellow coaches, Steve Kerr might have walked away from basketball for a while. The pain from spinal fluid leakage from a couple of back surgeries he had two summers ago (the ones that led to Luke Walton coaching the first half of the season in Golden State) would have been too much.

But he tolerated and managed the pain as best he could, until a few days ago when it became too much. Kerr did not coach the final two games of the Warriors sweep of the Trail Blazers and said he would not return to the bench until healthy enough to do so.

Kerr’s next step is to talk to specialists at Stanford University’s medical program, and Kerr is optimistic about the long-term prognosis, he told Monty Poole of NBC Sports Bay Area.

He revealed to NBCSportsBayArea.com that in recent days he has spoken to several people who have experienced the debilitating effects of a cerebrospinal fluid leak and been able to overcome it. He says that because his symptoms have intensified over the past week, in an odd twist, that may make it easier for specialists to trace the precise source.

“That’s what the next few days are all about,” Kerr said, standing down the hallway from the visitor’s locker room. “They’re trying to find it. If they can find it, they can fix it.”

He’ll begin in the coming days by consulting with specialists at Stanford Medical Center, which has some of the more respected surgeons in the world.

Kerr said his spirits have been lifted by other people who went through this, people who told him doctors found the leak and it changed their lives, that they bounced back to 100 percent. He said that the first back surgeries did their job in relieving his lower back pain, but it has led to spinal fluid leakage that is worse than the symptoms the first surgery solved.

Whether a fix can happen to get him back on the bench these playoffs is immaterial, we all hope it happens just so Kerr the person can go back to enjoying his life without chronic pain. He’ll be around the team as much as he can through the playoffs, but there are far more important things going on with him than basketball right now.