New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin shakes hands with MInnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love before game

“Linsanity” came when Lin stopped trying to play for others


Just go out and play. Let God and the universe take care of the rest of it.

That is the battle Jeremy Lin says he fights daily now — not trying to live up to the expectations of others, not trying to control everything, but just going out and playing basketball. Lin — a devoutly religious man who has talked of becoming a minister after basketball — said he wants to turn everything else over to God and not worry about it. Whether you are Christian or Buddhist or anything else, not worrying about the physical is a hard.

But Lin says that is what has gotten him to where he is now.

Lin talked about all of this in a fascinating interview with Marcus Thompson II at the Mercury News in the Bay Area (where Lin grew up and played his rookie year).

“Sometimes you come up against a mountain and you end up making the mountain seem bigger than God,” Lin said. “Last year, I was on pins and needles. I was putting all this unnecessary pressure on myself. Now, I feel like I’m free out there….

“I’m not playing to prove anything to anybody,” Lin said. “That affected my game last year and my joy last year. With all the media attention, all the love from the fans (in the Bay Area), I felt I needed to prove myself. Prove that I’m not a marketing tool, I’m not a ploy to improve attendance. Prove I can play in this league. But I’ve surrendered that to God. I’m not in a battle with what everybody else thinks anymore.”

What nearly everybody else thinks is that he’s the newest star of the NBA. It’s a story that resonates, certainly with Christians in the way the Tim Tebow story did (and Lin says Tebow is an inspiration).

But right now in America he resonates as a person kicked around by the system who did not give up, found his place and turned both his career and a franchise around. This is a nation suffering through the worst economic conditions since the Great Depression and in that we are drawn to the stories of guys who do not give up, who overcome adversity.

Last season Lin was not this good with the Warriors. He shot 38.9 percent (it is 49.6 percent this year), he assisted on about 20 percent of his teammates baskets when he was on the floor, and his PER was an average 14.8 in limited minutes. This season 47.7 percent of his teammates baskets when he is on the floor and has an All-Star level PER of 25.9.

The Warriors let Lin go because they needed his salary to make a big offer to DeAndre Jordan (one the Clippers matched). The Rockets took him in but had two quality point guards (Kyle Lowry and Goran Dragic) then they let him go when they needed his salary to make a big offer to Samuel Dalembert.

The Knicks got him and sent him to the D-League (where he dropped a triple double). According to the Mercury News, Lin got his first real shot against the Nets one night because Carmelo Anthony told Mike D’Antoni to give him a shot.

And it worked, Linsanity was suddenly born out of nowhere. Why? Because he just started going out and playing, not worrying about everything else. Now he just wants to keep that going.

“It’s a platform I’ve been given,” Lin said. “I want to be real. I don’t want to have a false image. I want people to see who I am and what God has done in my life.

“If people don’t like me or are waiting for me to fail, that’s on them. I don’t want to offend anybody. I don’t want to be overbearing. But I’ve got to be who I am.”

LeBron James says he rides a motorcycle

LeBron James
Leave a comment

LeBron James appeared in a GQ video, and as one of the hosts discussed his leather jacket, LeBron noted he should’ve ridden his motorcycle to the set. It seemed the Cavaliers star might have been joking, but a few seconds later, he explicitly said he owned a different, three-wheel motorcycle.

Asked what the team thinks of his riding, LeBron said:

Oh, man. They’re like, “What are you doing?” I’m like, “What you think I’m doing? I’m getting a breath of fresh air. You know? I’ve got one life with this, man. So, that’s what I’m doing.”

It’s impossible to think of an NBA player riding a motorcycle without Jay Williams coming to mind.

Williams, the No. 2 overall pick in 2002, crashed his motorcycle after his rookie season and suffered career-ending injuries. The tragedy caused him to attempt suicide.

Thankfully, Williams – a college basketball analyst – appears to be doing better now. But that incident has left increased scrutiny on NBA players riding motorcycles.

The Collective Bargaining Agreement states (emphasis mine):

Accordingly, the Player agrees that he will not, without the written consent of the Team, engage in any activity that a reasonable person would recognize as involving or exposing the participant to a substantial risk of bodily injury including, but not limited to: (i) sky-diving, hang gliding, snow skiing, rock or mountain climbing (as distinguished from hiking), rappelling, and bungee jumping; (ii) any fighting, boxing, or wrestling; (iii) driving or riding on a motorcycle or moped; (iv) riding in or on any motorized vehicle in any kind of race or racing contest; (v) operating an aircraft of any kind; (vi) engaging in any other activity excluded or prohibited by or under any insurance policy which the Team procures against the injury, illness or disability to or of the Player, or death of the Player, for which the Player has received written notice from the Team prior to the execution of this Contract; or (vii) participating in any game or exhibition of basketball, football, baseball, hockey, lacrosse, or other team sport or competition. If the Player violates this Paragraph 12, he shall be subject to discipline imposed by the Team and/or the Commissioner of the NBA.

It’s hard to see the Cavaliers restricting LeBron on anything like this. They practically let him write his own contract – two-year max with a player option and trade kicker – annually so he can keep collecting as the salary cap rises. If he requested a clause allowing him to ride a motorcycle, would they really say no?

On the other hand, I doubt they want their franchise player taking any undue risks. It’s worth noting, though, that Williams wasn’t wearing a helmet and didn’t have a license. Maybe the Cavaliers could accept LeBron riding in a safer manner.

But if they didn’t consent and LeBron is riding a motorcycle, what would the consequences be? They’re not voiding his contract. It’d be up to the team and Adam Silver to determine punishment, and I don’t recall any precedent for that type of violation.

76ers owner: Brett Brown deserves an ‘A’

Brett Brown
1 Comment

Only one person in NBA history has coached as many games as Brett Brown and had a worst winning percentage.

The 76ers coach, who sports a 37-127 record, is trumped by just Brian Winters. Winters went 36-148 with the expansion Grizzlies and during interim stint guiding the Warriors.

Brown is entering the third season of his four-year contract, and Philadelphia general manager Sam Hinkie has been mum about an extension.

76ers owner Josh Harris is taking a similar approach, but he also says a lot of nice things about Brown.

Harris, via John Finger of CSN Philly:

“It’s probably not appropriate for me to talk about specifics about what the negotiations are with him,” Harris said during a media conference on Thursday at the team’s training camp at Stockton College.

“I give Brett an A for the job he’s done,” Harris said. “He’s been an incredible player development person, which is what we need at this point in time. He’s a great person to be around. He’s enthusiastic and he’s a born coach and a leader of men. I’m very impressed with Brett and I hope and expect Brett to be around the team for a very long time.”

Brown has done a fantastic job keeping this team engaged through losing and developing its young players. It’s not his fault Philadelphia stinks. Tanking is an organizational decision.

But the 76ers aren’t tanking forever, and soon, they’ll require a different type of coaching.

Is Brown up for it? No idea. He hasn’t had any chance to prove it.

After all he’s done, though, he probably deserves a chance to find out.