Carmelo Anthony, Tayshaun Prince, Jason Maxiel

Baseline to Baseline recaps: ‘Melo is back, Knicks cruise

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What you missed while getting arrested for attacking people and police with a toy light saber

Knicks 113, Pistons 86: Carmelo Anthony returned, he had 25 efficient points while playing his best game in weeks, and the Knicks cruise to an easy win. Coincidence? Well, kind of. This win was really about the Knicks defense creating turnovers (20) and turning those into fast break buckets. New York also was nailing it’s threes (9-18) and getting inside (52 points in the paint). The Knicks played well and with a little desperation, but don’t lose sight of the fact the Pistons are terrible.

Grizzlies 100, Nuggets 97 (OT): Denver led virtually the entire game — from the second quarter through being up 10 with six minutes left — except the part where the game ends. A 7-0 run by Memphis in the second half of overtime — sparked by O.J. Mayo’s five OT points including a three to take the lead with 35 seconds remaining — got the win. Rudy Fernandez got a look at a three to send it to a second OT but it clanged off the rim.

Marc Gasol played 50 minutes — you read that right, 50 — and had 20 points, 13 boards, but was not very efficient. For Denver, Danilo Gallinari was 1-10 shooting, Timofey Mozgov was a foul sponge and got five in 10 minutes.

Hawks 100, Raptors 77: Atlanta closed out the first half on a 23-6 run and that was pretty much your ballgame. Joe Johnson turned back the clock and had 30, 24 in the first half, and he got to rest the entire fourth. As did all the Hawks starters.

Atlanta is 9-2 without Al Horford. That is impressive.

Celtics 93, Cavaliers 90: Boston was up 22 in the third quarter, then almost gave it all back. Almost. Kyrie Irving scored 13 of his 21 in the fourth quarter, and Anderson Varejao was the best player on the court with a 20-20 night. Boston’s offense — led by 20 points from Paul Pierce — had good ball movement, which led to good looks and the team shooting 50.7 percent on the night. Kevin Garnett, who was pretty average all game, did hit a key shot late that helped seal the win.

Warriors 93, Kings 90: Golden State’s bench won this one — Brandon Rush had 20 (15 in the fourth quarter), Nate Robinson 13 and provided his usual spark, and Ekpe Udoh had 6 points and 4 blocks. The Golden State bench sparked a 16-4 run to start the fourth quarter that got the Warriors the lead, so Mark Jackson rode them the rest of the way. Rookie Isaiah Thomas sparked a late 11-1 Kings run to make it close, but it was not enough.

Pacers 106, Nets, 99: Give the Nets credit, the hung in this one when they probably shouldn’t have. This is a tough match up for New Jersey because they have no interior defense to speak of and the Pacers have Roy Hibbert and good slashers that get into the paint. Deron Williams (34) and Anthony Morrow (28) scored every Net point in the fourth quarter, but it was not enough. Paul George had 24 and the dunk of the night, Danny Granger had 21.

Lakers 106, Bobcats 73: Kobe Bryant had 18 points in the first quarter, the Lakers pulled away early and never really looked back. The Lakers shot 46.2 percent from three for the night — when they knock down the outside shot it makes defending the inside games of Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum almost impossible. Teams are mostly throwing doubles at the Lakers big three once they make a move, and that means the rest of the guys are getting clean looks from the outside. When those shots fall the Lakers are very hard to beat — Lakers not named Kobe were 10-15 from beyond the arc. The Bobcats are a team that just settles for the first decent look it sees, they don’t work the ball for a better shot at all. They play with no sense of urgency at all (except Kemba Walker, I like him).

C.J. McCollum on Warriors: ‘They set a lot of illegal screens’

Portland Trail Blazers guard C.J. McCollum, center, reaches for the ball between Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green, top, and forward Andre Iguodala during the second half in Game 1 of a second-round NBA basketball playoff series in Oakland, Calif., Sunday, May 1, 2016. The Warriors won 118-106. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu
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Trail Blazers coach Terry Stotts accused Anderson Varejao of being dirty on a particular play.

C.J. McCollum says the Warriors cross the line much more regularly.

via Jason Quick of CSN Northwest:

“They set a lot of illegal screens,’’ Blazers guard CJ McCollum said Tuesday at the team’s shootaround at The Olympic Club. “They are moving and stuff. That’s the respect you get when you are champions, you get a lot more respect from the referees. You have to figure out a way to get around those screens and make it difficult.’’

One underappreciated element of the Warriors’ success is their excellent screening. Draymond Green and Andrew Bogut are two of the NBA’s best. Even the diminutive Stephen Curry wreaks havoc with his screens, leveraging his shooting ability to befuddle defenders.

Do the Warriors sometimes set illegal screens? Yup. Do they do so more than other teams? Yup. Do they do so more than every other team? Anecdotally, probably, though I’d love to see numbers.

But that’s part of Golden State’s strategy. The Warriors screeners so often straddle the line, they move it. It’s a fine line between a good legal screen and an illegal one, and Golden State dares the refs to blow the whistle.

McCollum can campaign for that to change, and his statements might cause the league to instruct referees to watch Warrior screens more closely. But even if Golden State has to harness its movement and arm extensions on picks, the team is more than capable of setting quality clean screens.

Anderson Varejao responds to Terry Stotts’ ‘dirty play’ charge: Not intentional

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Golden State backup big man Anderson Varejao insists he didn’t deliberately trip Trail Blazers guard Gerald Henderson in Game 1 of their Western Conference semifinal playoff series.

Yet after watching the replay, he understands it sure looked like he did it on purpose – which is what Henderson thought. Varejao said it looked worse than it was.

“When I looked at the play, I was like, `Oh, it looked like I was trying to do that,”‘ he said. “How can I try to do something like that? I’m going down and my foot got stuck. That’s all.”

Portland coach Terry Stotts on Monday called it a “dirty play.” Then Tuesday, the NBA ruled it a Flagrant 1 foul on Varejao.

Game 2 of the best-of-seven series was set for Tuesday night at Oracle Arena, and both players involved seemed to be ready to move forward.

The 33-year-old Varejao, a 12th-year NBA veteran from Brazil, said in response to Stotts that he isn’t a dirty player.

“It’s a playoff game, we all know it’s going to be like that. I don’t know exactly what he’s talking about. I just thought it was a physical play,” Varejao said after the morning shootaround. “Got hit in my back, I was going down, my feet got stuck somewhere and all of a sudden, someone else fell. I’m sorry that that happened. Do you think I’m looking for guys to take them out? No. I know how it is to be hurt. I’ve been hurt enough.

“I would never try to hurt anybody, I would never do that.”

He and Henderson were ejected late in the third quarter of Sunday’s game after receiving their second technical fouls. Both were hit with a technical at the 3:29 mark of the third when Varejao tripped Henderson after they collided. Henderson jumped up, pointing a finger at his opponent’s face. They kept jawing a few minutes later and were tossed with 15.1 seconds left in the period.

Stotts was still steamed about it a day later.

“Varejao made a dirty play. It was a leg-whip and I thought it was a dangerous play,” he said. “I thought Gerald’s reaction to being tripped like that was appropriate. Otherwise, no one would have seen it. It was unfortunate that he got tossed on the second, but you have to defend yourself – especially when somebody makes a dirty play.”

Henderson said after the game that he believed Varejao thought the Blazers guard ran into him on purpose.

“I hit him. I bumped him good. But I didn’t, I wasn’t trying to hit him,” Henderson said, calling it “a little excessive” to have Varejao go at his legs.

Varejao said Tuesday he was initially surprised Henderson came at him.

“But looking at the play, he had the right to do it. I understand why he came back at me the way he did, which is OK, guys. It’s a playoff game,” Varejao said. “It’s going to be physical. It’s fun when it gets like that.”

Raptors starting Norman Powell over Patrick Patterson against Heat

Toronto Raptors' Norman Powell (24) runs back up court after the Raptors scored against the Indiana Pacers during the second half of Game 5 of an NBA first-round playoff basketball series, Tuesday, April 26, 2016 in Toronto. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP
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Raptors coach Dwane Casey got a taste of changing his starting lineup.

Now he can’t stop.

Matt Devlin of Raptors.com:

Norman Powell replaces Patrick Patterson (who replaced regular-season starter Luis Scola in the first round). This makes the Raptors smaller and increases their ability to switch among their three starting wings – Powell, DeMarre Carroll and DeMar DeRozan.

Luol Deng gave the Hornets plenty of trouble as a stretch four in the last round. Toronto countered that advantage before falling victim to it.

The key will be the Raptors holding their own in the paint, rebounding and defending, and maintaining a reserve advantage that boosted them all season.

Stephen Curry wins Magic Johnson Award

OAKLAND, CA - MARCH 29:  TNT report Craig Sager interviews Stephen Curry #30 of the Golden State Warriors after their game against the Washington Wizards at ORACLE Arena on March 29, 2016 in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK (AP) — Stephen Curry has won the Magic Johnson Award, given by the Professional Basketball Writers Association to an NBA player who combines excellence on the court with cooperation with the public and media.

Curry led the NBA with 30.1 points per game and a record 402 3-pointers in leading the Golden State Warriors to a 73-9 record, best in league history.

The reigning MVP beat out teammate Draymond Green, Portland’s Damian Lillard, New York’s Carmelo Anthony and Atlanta’s Paul Millsap on Tuesday in voting by the PBWA, made up of approximately 175 writers and editors who cover the league on a regular basis.

The award was created in 2001 and named for Hall of Famer Earvin “Magic” Johnson, whom the PWBA regards as “the ideal model for the award.”