Lakers' Bryant watches a Heat free throw in their NBA basketball game in Miami

Lakers change offensive systems then struggle. Shocking.

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When some of us argued that Brian Shaw was the best coach to take over the Lakers after Phil Jackson left, the reasoning was simply that you don’t change horses in the middle of the stream.

The Lakers are still (theoretically) in a championship window. They had been playing the triangle for years and while not all the players in the locker room liked it the roster was largely built to run it. Kobe Bryant fit well in it. Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum could work well in it. No other system really fits Derek Fisher anymore.

But Jim Buss wanted to put his stamp on the organization, so all things Jackson were out and in came defensive minded Mike Brown. And the Lakers are playing good defense — even after the Heat ran all over them the Lakers are sixth in the NBA in points allowed per possession. Problem is they are 19th in points scored per possession. Even when Kobe goes off, the Lakers offense is pretty average.

You get what you ask for, Kevin Ding of the Orange County Register reminds us all.

But the same reasons I gave for lobbying the Lakers to give Shaw the job in May remain valid: The Lakers’ motivation for this season was already there from wasting last season, and they could’ve been set up to do everything they already knew – just better – with renewed hunger, the same triangle offense and a healthier Kobe Bryant.

By choosing Brown, the Lakers embraced massive change, which is generally a very good thing only when things are already very bad. We are seeing now just how rough the ride has to be in starting from scratch.

“It’s under construction,” Kobe Bryant said late Thursday night of Brown’s offense. “Still working on the blueprints, actually.”

The good news for Lakers fans is that the Lakers are playing good defense so far this season. If they had done that last season maybe things turn out differently. The other reason for optimism is that as they play more games and the season wears on, they will start to figure out the offense more and how to exploit mismatches. The Lakers could and should have dominated the Heat in the paint on Thursday, but they didn’t set up scoring chances in there well enough or often enough. The result was a thumping.

When you start things over from scratch, you get some of those. It’s what the Lakers ownership asked for.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.