Booker Woodfox

It’s All About Having An NBA Skill At D-League Showcase

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The eighth annual NBA Development League Showcase is officially halfway over with the conclusion of Tuesday night’s games, but there’s plenty of talent still hoping to standout in front of the bevy of decision makers that made the trip to Reno, Nev., for the D-League’s premier event of the season. In order to get their attention, it’s been proven in the past that having one transferable skill is all that is absolutely necessary.

Having a certain amount of upside is one way to get  a call-up — as Malcolm Thomas with the Spurs proved earlier this week and fellow rookie prospects like Greg Smith, Edwin Ubiles and  Frank Hassell will likely prove as the season progresses — but it certainly isn’t the only way (Grantland’s Jonathan Givony noted earlier Wednesday that it isn’t even completely on-the-court talents that matter to when teams look to call up a player).

A player can average 25 points per game in the D-League and get lots of attention, but it’s the players that are able to do just one thing at an NBA-level — rebound, defend on the paint or in the wing, shoot consistently from beyond the arc, run an offense without turning the ball over — who garner the most attention when it comes to the executives in attendance.

The players that have been able to carve out a long-term niche in the NBA by way of the D-League prove this, too, because it isn’t often that guys like Chris Andersen, Lou Amundson, Matt Carroll, Anthony Tolliver and Greg Stiemsma are the most talented players on an NBA court. They’re all able to do one thing very well, however, and that’s what allows them to find themselves on a big league roster.

The D-League wasn’t created for making stars, after all, but rather helping develop players into NBA contributors. There are plenty of players on NBA rosters already that can put a ball in a bucket.

One of the best examples of a player exemplifying the role-playing role, as it were, is Greg Ostertag. Ostertag’s NBA comeback has been well-publicized and, even though it looked like it might be a disaster at first, the longtime center for the Utah Jazz seems to have a solid plan for working his way back to the NBA.

“Teams know what I can bring to the table – putbacks, clogging the paint, rebounding and that’s it,” Ostertag told Pro Basketball Talk on Tuesday. “It’s more just a matter of getting into shape enough to go out and play 10 minutes or 20 minutes or whatever an NBA team wants me to play.”

The 38-year-old told the Legends that he wants to play role player minutes in the D-League, too, to prove that he can still be effective in that role … even if he is slightly past his prime.

Some of the top role players can be identified simply by looking through the D-League’s statistical leaders: Booker Woodfox is shooting 46 percent from beyond the arc, Marcus Lewis of the Tulsa 66ers is averaging an impressive 14.2 rebounds despite not showing a lot of other discernible NBA skills, journeyman point guard Walker Russell is averaging two more assists than the next any of his D-League counterparts and 7-foot-5 center Will Foster is blocking more than three shots per game at the rim.

There isn’t a column in the box score that measures a player’s ability to do the little things, however, why is why scouts from all 30 NBA teams showed up in Reno this week to watch 160 off-the-radar players in person. It’ll be interesting to see which players stood out as call-ups begin to come in full-force during the upcoming weeks.

Mike Budenholzer smirks at lawyer calling Thabo Sefolosha ‘NBA superstar’

Mike Budenholzer, Thabo Sefolosha
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The funny part, via Robert Silverman:

The substantive part:

NEW YORK (AP) — NBA player Thabo Sefolosha, who was arrested outside a New York City nightclub in April following a confrontation with police officer, has a character “of the highest order,” his head coach, Mike Budenholzer, testified Thursday.

Taking the stand as the final defense witness in Sefolosha’s trial, Budenholzer described the Atlanta Hawks guard-forward as “highly intelligent” and a “hard worker.”

When asked by defense attorney Alex Spiro to describe his character, he said it was, “of the highest order.”

“Thabo is of the highest character,” he said during brief testimony in Manhattan Criminal Court.

The Swiss national is charged with misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest charges stemming from a confrontation with officers outside a trendy Manhattan nightclub early in the morning on April 8. He has pleaded not guilty.

Officers testified this week that Sefolosha and former teammate Pero Antic repeatedly disobeyed their orders to move off the block and away from a crime scene that had been established following the earlier stabbing of another NBA player, Chris Copeland, and two women.

One of the officers also said Sefolosha lunged at an officer with his arm extended but was intercepted before making contact, eventually taken to the ground and arrested.

Sefolosha has testified that he was complying with orders and moving up the block as a particularly aggressive officer screamed profanities at him.

His attorney has argued that his client was singled out by the officer, who is white, because Sefolosha is black.

Sefolosha testified Thursday that he was trying to give money to a panhandler before entering an awaiting car when he was grabbed by police. He said his leg was kicked in the scuffle and he was taken to the ground, handcuffed and hauled to a police precinct. He suffered a fractured right leg, which forced him to miss the playoffs.

The case is the second one involving high-profile athletes accusing New York Police Department officers of wrongdoing this year. On Wednesday, the city agency charged with investigating police misconduct substantiated claims by former tennis star James Blake that an officer used excessive force when he took him to the ground last month after mistkaing Blake for a fraud suspect.

As expected, Jimmy Butler says no issue between him, Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose, Jimmy Butler
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Is the Derrick Rose/Jimmy Butler relationship nothing but puppy dogs and rainbows? No. There will be sparks between two intense competitors.

Have those sparks started a fire Bulls fans should be concerned about? A report on Wednesday said the core problem was Butler doesn’t respect Rose’s work ethic, which provided some kindling for that spark to catch.

However, as you would expect, Butler said this was all much ado about nothing, that he and Rose are all good. Via K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Spin this however you wish: Their relationship is fine and someone in the media is making this up; or their relationship has been rough, and this is all just leaking out now.

This is a Bulls team in a bit of a transition as Rose declines some and Butler has grown into a top-flight player. Clearly that dynamic has some people around the team — likely the people in one of one of the players’ camps doesn’t like the power struggle or where it leaves his buddy — talking out of school to the press.

But as Butler noted, winning cures all ills. If Chicago can get off to a fast start, nobody will be asking chemistry questions.

For now, however, tounges are wagging.