Mario Chalmers

Do the Heat need another point guard?


The Miami Heat may not have the most complete roster in the league in conventional terms, but thus far they’ve indisputably boasted the league’s most effective one. Miami is sitting awfully pretty with an 8-1 record, the NBA’s fifth-ranked offense, and its second best defense.

But even those on top of the world have their problems from time to time, and on Saturday, Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun Sentinel took note of a potential — though strictly hypothetical — issue in South Beach:

As Mario Chalmers was dealing first with a bum shoulder and then foul trouble Saturday in New Jersey, the oddest of realities for such a loaded roster surfaced: What if Chalmers were forced to miss a game or was forced out of a game?

The reaction is to point to Norris Cole and say just go from there. But as a starter, with his one-speed, high-octane-only approach? There is a reason either Chalmers or none of the Heat two point guards have been closing close games.

Compared to the ails of the league-worst Washington Wizards, the injury woes of the Memphis Grizzlies, or the lingering troubles of the Dallas Mavericks, such a concern seems rather minor. But what Miami’s flaws lack in magnitude, they certainly make up for in consequence; as the most talented team in the league and the favorite to win the NBA title, even the most minor rotational issue in Miami could have startling ripple effects on the outcome of the season on a league-wide scale.

Yet even with that in mind, the potential for a serious injury to either Chalmers or Cole should only register as a blip on Miami’s radar. Such season-altering breaks or tweaks often come without warning, but Erik Spoelstra likely sleeps well at night — err, would sleep well at night if he weren’t still spending the deepest hours of the night in the film room — knowing that his point guard rotation is as secure as any in the NBA.

On paper, the Heat do, in fact, have just two nominal point guards. Spoelstra has even made it a point of emphasis this season to have one of them on the floor at all times; according to, the Heat have played just seven of their 699 minutes thus far without either Chalmers or Cole in the lineup, a testament to Spo’s steadfast commitment to both spacing the floor and putting as many shot creators on the court as possible. Both of those things are incredibly important for Miami’s half-court offense, but not so much that those two ideals justify filling minutes with subpar talent.

The Heat are in the envious position of having more capable contributors than rotation spots with considerable playing time. Although a hypothetical injury to either Chalmers or Cole would remove one such player from that logjam, Miami would still have the non-injured point, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Mike Miller, Shane Battier, James Jones, and even rookie rebounding stud Terrel Harris to plug in between the 1 and the wings. It’s tempting and understandable to think that the Heat could benefit from adding a free agent point guard in order to bolster that rotation, doing so would overestimate the importance of conventional lineup configurations and undervalue the sheer talent Miami has on its roster.

I’ll spare you all the apositional preaching; we know that James and Wade are more capable of initiating Miami’s offense than the Marcus Bankses and Antonio Danielses of the world, and more importantly, they would theoretically allow Spoelstra to put more competent NBA players on the floor. Fit is required, as is a meshing of skill sets. But the objective is still to field a winning team regardless of structure, and the talents of James, Wade, and Miller — even in a physically demanding shortened season, even as Spoelstra is trying to play his best players off the ball more, and even in knowing just how much Miller struggled last season — give Miami a far better basis for quality lineups than a stopgap point guard ever could.

Mike Budenholzer smirks at lawyer calling Thabo Sefolosha ‘NBA superstar’

Mike Budenholzer, Thabo Sefolosha
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The funny part, via Robert Silverman:

The substantive part:

NEW YORK (AP) — NBA player Thabo Sefolosha, who was arrested outside a New York City nightclub in April following a confrontation with police officer, has a character “of the highest order,” his head coach, Mike Budenholzer, testified Thursday.

Taking the stand as the final defense witness in Sefolosha’s trial, Budenholzer described the Atlanta Hawks guard-forward as “highly intelligent” and a “hard worker.”

When asked by defense attorney Alex Spiro to describe his character, he said it was, “of the highest order.”

“Thabo is of the highest character,” he said during brief testimony in Manhattan Criminal Court.

The Swiss national is charged with misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest charges stemming from a confrontation with officers outside a trendy Manhattan nightclub early in the morning on April 8. He has pleaded not guilty.

Officers testified this week that Sefolosha and former teammate Pero Antic repeatedly disobeyed their orders to move off the block and away from a crime scene that had been established following the earlier stabbing of another NBA player, Chris Copeland, and two women.

One of the officers also said Sefolosha lunged at an officer with his arm extended but was intercepted before making contact, eventually taken to the ground and arrested.

Sefolosha has testified that he was complying with orders and moving up the block as a particularly aggressive officer screamed profanities at him.

His attorney has argued that his client was singled out by the officer, who is white, because Sefolosha is black.

Sefolosha testified Thursday that he was trying to give money to a panhandler before entering an awaiting car when he was grabbed by police. He said his leg was kicked in the scuffle and he was taken to the ground, handcuffed and hauled to a police precinct. He suffered a fractured right leg, which forced him to miss the playoffs.

The case is the second one involving high-profile athletes accusing New York Police Department officers of wrongdoing this year. On Wednesday, the city agency charged with investigating police misconduct substantiated claims by former tennis star James Blake that an officer used excessive force when he took him to the ground last month after mistkaing Blake for a fraud suspect.

As expected, Jimmy Butler says no issue between him, Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose, Jimmy Butler
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Is the Derrick Rose/Jimmy Butler relationship nothing but puppy dogs and rainbows? No. There will be sparks between two intense competitors.

Have those sparks started a fire Bulls fans should be concerned about? A report on Wednesday said the core problem was Butler doesn’t respect Rose’s work ethic, which provided some kindling for that spark to catch.

However, as you would expect, Butler said this was all much ado about nothing, that he and Rose are all good. Via K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Spin this however you wish: Their relationship is fine and someone in the media is making this up; or their relationship has been rough, and this is all just leaking out now.

This is a Bulls team in a bit of a transition as Rose declines some and Butler has grown into a top-flight player. Clearly that dynamic has some people around the team — likely the people in one of one of the players’ camps doesn’t like the power struggle or where it leaves his buddy — talking out of school to the press.

But as Butler noted, winning cures all ills. If Chicago can get off to a fast start, nobody will be asking chemistry questions.

For now, however, tounges are wagging.