Grizzlies trade Vasquez to Hornets for Pondexter

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In a trade that if it winds up affecting the NBA season means something has gone horribly horribly wrong, the Memphis Grizzlies traded guard Greivis Vasquez to the New Orleans Hornets for guard-forward Quincy Pondexter.

Grizzlies head coach Lionel Hollins has spoken highly of guard Jeremy Pargo backing up it Mike Conley in preseason play, and Pargo seemed to garner more minutes than Vasquez, despite Vasquez’ contributions to the Grizzlies’ playoff run last season. But the acquisition of Pondexter seems to signal another move is on the horizon. At 6-6, Pondexter will struggle to play down low, which is where the Grizzlies have the most glaring need in terms of depth. Furthermore, now at the wings, the Grizzlies have Rudy Gay, Tony Allen, Sam Young, O.J. Mayo, Josh Selby, and Xavier Henry. Something’s got to give, considering how many minutes RG and Allen will play.

For the Hornets, it’s a low-risk move. They just acquired Al-Farouq Aminu and need a backup point guard. Vasquez doesn’t have a very high ceiling or much room for improvement, but he’s serviceable and always ends up surprising people. It’s not a great move, but it’s not a mistake, either.

A thrilling Christmas-Eve blockbuster, it is.

Pat Riley says he wishes he gave Chris Bosh’s max contract to Dwyane Wade

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
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Heat president Pat Riley has said he should’ve given Dwyane Wade a max contract in 2014 after LeBron James left Miami.

Instead, Wade stayed with the Heat on what became two one-year contracts. That lack of long-term security bothered Wade, who took discounts in prior years, and contributed to his exit to the Bulls.

But paying Wade and Chris Bosh, who got a max contract from Miami two years ago, so much into their late 30s likely would have cost the Heat dearly. It’s nearly impossible to build around two declining max players.

Riley apparently has a retroactive plan for that – re-signing only Wade, not Bosh.

Wright Thompson of ESPN:

But of course, Riley says, almost immediately after LeBron left, Bosh’s camp wanted to reopen a deal they’d just finished, knowing the Heat had money and felt vulnerable. Bosh threatened to sign with the Rockets. In the end, Riley gave Bosh what he wanted. Now he wishes he’d said no to Bosh’s max deal and given all that money to Wade.

Riley says that Wade’s agent asked to deal directly with the owners instead of Pat, so he merely honored that request. Mostly, he just wishes the whole thing had gone differently. “I know he feels I didn’t fight hard enough for him,” he says. “I was very, very sad when Dwyane said no. I wish I could have been there and told him why I didn’t really fight for him at the end. … I fought for the team. The one thing I wanted to do for him, and maybe this is what obscured my vision, but I wanted to get him another player so he could end his career competitive.”

When he describes his reaction to Wade’s leaving, it’s always in terms of how sad it makes him feel

Riley has done a much better job explaining to the public how sad he is about Wade leaving rather than actually doing something while he had the chance or even expressing his regret to Wade after the fact.

It’s almost as if Riley knew excommunicating a Heat Lifer would be both good for the franchise long-term and a terrible look in the short term and is trying to mitigate the damage. Wade might even realize that, too.

To a certain degree, Riley could be speaking in hindsight. Bosh’s deal has not worked out, with Riley believing the big man’s career is over due to blood-clot issues. But hindsight also says giving Wade, now 35, a five-year contract two years ago would’ve been disastrous.

There’s sentimentality at work here. Wade is the greatest player in Heat history. Riley drafted him, groomed him and built three championship teams in two eras around him.

I just can’t figure out how much Riley is exploiting that sentimentality to warm Miami fans after coldly letting Wade walk and how much Riley genuinely regrets contract negotiations with Wade. This is almost certainly shades of both.

Raptors’ Patrick Patterson and P.J. Tucker wear same outfit to Game 4 (photo)

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I can’t verify Raptors forwards Patrick Patterson and P.J. Tucker wearing the same outfit to last night’s Game 4 against the Bucks is the happenstance Patterson presents it as. But there’s a saying in journalism: It’s too good to check out.

Whatever led to this, Toronto ought to keep doing it. The Raptors smashed Milwaukee.

Patterson:

Isaiah Thomas’ sons giggle about Fred Hoiberg’s carrying complaint (video)

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Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg diverted attention to Isaiah Thomascarrying – perhaps the lamest attempt ever of a coach angling for calls through the media, made worse by it following one of the best of all time.

Thomas’ sons saw how silly it was, laughing as the Celtics guard responded.

“It’s not that funny,” Thomas said, sparking even more laughter.

Patrick Beverley: ‘If the NBA won’t protect the players… I have to protect myself’

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The NBA fined Patrick Beverley $25,000 for confronting a fan after the Rockets’ Game 3 loss to the Thunder in Oklahoma City on Friday.

But he’s not going down quietly.

Beverley on the run-ins, which began when he fell into the crowd in the second quarter after being fouled, via Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

“I’m OK with the hazing,” Beverley said. “I’m OK with the boos. I’m OK with other fans rooting for their team. But I’m not OK with the blatant disrespect while I’m lying on the ground and a fan yelling out to me, ‘F you Patrick Beverley, ‘F you Patrick Beverley, ‘F you Patrick Beverley,’ waving a clapper in my face. I’m not comfortable with that.

“If the NBA won’t protect the players, I feel as a man, as a grown man who has children, who has morals, to stand up for the right thing. I have to protect myself.”

“When I mean protect myself, I don’t mean go out there and start a fight with a person. I walked up to the guy, ‘At the end of the day brother, this is a game.’ No curse words. No pointing fingers. No this. No that. I just let him know that just don’t do nothing like that.”

“To put this in all perspective, this isn’t the first incident I had with OKC,” Beverley said. “I had a ballboy tell me he was going to kill me. What type of league, what is this? I had to have a police officer out in front of my house, I can’t be on the same floor as my teammates. My first year in NBA basketball I have a person saying on Twitter he was going to kill me. So, what to do?”

Beverley said by addressing the situation on Friday as he did he felt he brought more attention to it, increasing security awareness.

The ball-boy incident occurred in 2013, when Beverley injured Russell Westbrook‘s knee while going for a steal as Westbrook called timeout. Westbrook missed the rest of the playoffs, and Thunder fans have resented Beverley since.

It’s not the most pleasant aspect of sports, but I don’t have a huge problem with fans in their seats heckling players on the court. But there should be a different standard when a player falls into the crowd. A fan yelling and clapping in Beverley’s face while he’s on the ground is not OK.

Of course, this is only Beverley’s side of the story. The fan – Stuart Scaramucci, son of Thunder minority owner Jay Scaramucci – gave his account of the postgame encounter to Fred Katz of The Norman Transcript:

“[Beverley] goes around the refs, around the dancers and walks right up and gets right in my face and starts putting his hand right in my sternum and saying, ‘Don’t you ever do it again. Don’t ever [expletive] do that. You can’t do that to me. I’m a player. You can’t do that. You can’t do that,’” Scaramucci told the Transcript late Friday night. “…My wife [Megan], at that point in time, was standing there with [a noisemaker the Thunder hand out to fans]. She holds it out, and she says, ‘You can’t be here. You need to be in the back.’

“Patrick turns to her and he just throws his hand up and brings it down. I’m not sure if he’s trying to slap the [noisemaker] or whatnot, but he slaps her right on her arm, and at that point, I flip and start screaming, ‘Patrick slapped my wife. Patrick slapped my wife. Patrick slapped my wife.’”

Again, this is only one side of the story. Beverley might tell a different one, but at least he’s getting his wish. We’re paying more attention to fan behavior and security.