NBA Season Preview: New York Knicks

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Last season: 42-40 — good enough for a middling playoff seed and a first round sweep at the hands of the Boston Celtics.

Head Coach: Mike D’Antoni, who has an intriguing roster but will have to step out of his comfort zone. As a playmaker, Toney Douglas isn’t Steve Nash…or Raymond Felton…or Chauncey Billups. As such, D’Antoni’s typically PG-heavy offense will have to evolve in order to better feature Amar’e Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony, all while keeping everything from devolving into an intolerably lengthy series of isolation plays.

Key Departures: Chauncey Billups, Ronny Turiaf

Key Additions: Tyson Chandler, Iman Shumpert, Mike Bibby, Baron Davis

Best case scenario: Chandler becomes the centerpiece of a competent (but obviously sub-elite) defense, and the Knicks’ offense soars behind the sheer power of the team’s two highly productive scorers. That pushes New York toward a favorable playoff seed, a first round victory, and an improbable second-round toppling of a deflated Boston Celtics squad. The Heat still swoop in to quickly usher the Knicks out of the postseason, but what really matters is the journey, not the destination, right?

For that to happen: Toney Douglas will have to Do What Toney Douglas Do each and every damn night. Mike Bibby, Baron Davis and Iman Shumpert each have their strengths, but Douglas is the team’s best option at the point, and he’ll have to make the most of a pretty incredible opportunity. (Davis will give you flashes of brilliance but more consistently bad decisions, like pull up threes 5 seconds into the shot clock, taking shots away from ‘Melo, Stoudemire. And his defense will put more of a strain on Chandler. Douglas is the better option.)

That goes beyond shooting well from the perimeter (which Douglas often do) and pestering every defender in sight; Douglas will need to be a more functional creator this season than he has been in years past, and help Stoudemire, Anthony, and Chandler fit into a coherent offensive system. That’s a lot of responsibility to put on a player who’s only played limited minutes to date, but the situation calls for Douglas, and New York hopes he’ll call back. Or at least text or something?

Beyond that, the non-Chandler Knicks will have to make their newly acquired center’s life as easy as possible. That means no more pointing for you, Melo. And no more biting on pump fakes for you, Amar’e. Keep your man in front of you, shuffle those feet, and let Chandler serve as a safeguard rather than a one-man team defense. He’s clearly capable of providing a dominant defensive influence, but the degree of difficulty in New York is far higher than it ever was in Dallas.

More likely, the Knicks will: Boast one of the league’s best offenses, but nonetheless allow their defense to get them into some serious trouble. Chandler will be killing himself to thwart pick-and-rolls and challenge drives to the hoop, but the various defensive sieves on the roster (Anthony and Bibby being the prime offenders) could create more turmoil than he could ever hope to counter.

New York’s robust scoring is enough to nab a solid playoff seed and a first round victory, but this team just isn’t yet equipped to grapple with the truly elite clubs. A second-round out by the hand of the Bulls or Heat seems imminent.

Prediction: 40-26, good for the East’s fourth seed.

Russell Westbrook scores most points ever in triple-double, 57

AP Photo/John Raoux
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Russell Westbrook led a double-digit comeback in the final minutes of the fourth quarter. Been there done, that.

Westbrook hit a defining buzzer-beating 3-pointer. Been there done, that.

Westbrook posted a historic triple-double. Been there, done that.

All three in one game?

That’s a new level for Westbrook, who lifted the Thunder to a 114-106 win over the Magic tonight while posting an incredible stat line: 57 points, 13 rebounds and 11 assists.

James Harden scored 53 in a triple-double just this season, and Westbrook has already one-upped that record.

This MVP race is one for the ages.

Russell Westbrook’s 3-pointer caps incredible Thunder comeback, send Magic game to OT (video)

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The Thunder trailed the Magic by 21 points in the second half and 14 points midway through the fourth quarter.

Russell Westbrook capped the incredible comeback with this 3-pointer to send the game to overtime.

This becoming the norm for Oklahoma City.

NBA: Timberwolves got away with key late foul in win over Pacers

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Paul George expressed extreme dismay after the Pacers’ loss to the Timberwolves last night — the latest cause for concern in Indiana with its biggest star just one season from free agency.

But perhaps George wouldn’t have sounded so disillusioned if that game featured correct officiating down the stretch.

Minnesota’s Kris Dunn got away with fouling Jeff Teague by disrupting the Pacers guard’s speed/quickness/balance rhythm with 21.6 seconds left, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report:

Dunn (MIN) makes contact to Teague’s (IND) arm that affects his SQBR and causes him to lose control of the ball.

Because the Timberwolves were in the penalty, a correct would’ve sent Teague — who’s making 86% of his free throws this season and 84% for his career — to the line. He would’ve had two attempts to build on Indiana’s two-point lead.

Instead, he forced an off-balance shot, which Minnesota rebounded. Ricky Rubio drew a shooting foul on a 3-pointer on the other end, and his three free throws lifted the Timberwolves to a 115-114 win.

The two-minute report featured a few other missed calls: George getting away with pushing off then Wiggins getting away with fouling George on a possession where George missed anyway, Andrew Wiggins getting away with a travel on a possession where Minnesota turned the ball over anyway. But those were effectively wash’s. Dunn’s uncalled foul was the one of consequence — especially if it contributes, even in a small way, to George’s exit from the Pacers.

Edmond Sumner declares for NBA draft despite torn ACL

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Edmond Sumner has grown about five inches since high school.

That has helped turn the 6-foot-5 Xavier point guard into an intriguing NBA prospect — but also seemingly contributed to physical complications. Sumner missed nearly all of his freshman year with knee tendinitis. Then, after a promising second season and start to his third, he tore his ACL in January.

Still, he’s entering the NBA draft.

Sumner:

Rick Broering of Musketeer Report:

Like with Duke’s Harry Giles, medical testing will be huge with Sumner. But at least Giles ended the season on the court. Sumner might not be healthy at all during the pre-draft process.

Sumner looked like a borderline first-round pick before the injury. This probably pushes him into the second round.

His long strides provide impressive speed and quickness, and he’s still shifty. Add quality court vision, and his ability to drive by defenders is even more valuable.

A 6-foot-8 wingspan and good lateral mobility also help make him a quality defender.

But it’s also concerning that so much of his positives could be undermined by his knee issues, especially considering his unreliable jumper. If Sumner can’t move like he did before getting hurt, I don’t see how he sticks in the NBA.

If Sumner’s knees check out, it’s worth rolling the dice on him and hoping his jumper develops. He might even be OK without shooting range, though that’d lower his ceiling considerably.

Again, though, the first thing is examining his knees.