Owners have a lot to prove in the life of this CBA

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It’s over, and now we have to look back and survey the wreckage. 480 games lost. Millions of dollars in league revenue, local economy revenue, player salaries. Fans hurt by the way the league and players left them behind in pursuit of more money. Momentum lost after the most exciting season in over a decade. And for what?

Was any of this worth the effort? Was any of this worth the price?

For the owners, it better be.

The owners started this lockout, ending the structure of the league 149 days ago. They stood in pursuit of a total victory, wanting to crush the union, to instill measures to send the players’ economic influence in this league back to the stone ages, while removing the kind of power they had shown over the past 18 months in things like “The Decision” and Carmelo Anthony’s move to New York. They used draconian tactics, forcing their way past precedents set by the last deal and flying in the face of well-reasoned arguments that competitive balance cannot exist in the NBA. They decided to show it was their league and they’d run it how they saw fit.

They’ve gotten their chance, now we’ll have to see whether the fragile peace can hold, and if any of what the owners believed was true turns out to be grounded in reality.

Over the course of the next six years (the players will undoubtedly opt-out before the ten-year agreement is up), the owners have a lot to prove. They have to prove they can profit under the new system, that their biggest enemy is not themselves and their own inabilities to control spending and make wise decisions. They have to prove that competitive balance can be achieved and that small markets can now compete with larger ones for free agents and on the floor. Failure to do so will render their philosophy in this debacle a falsehood and pave the way for a further, potentially longer lockout six years down the road.

The split of BRI should help, but there’s still  the capacity for teams to fail. And that’s not because of the drain from the players or wasteful positions the league mostly eliminated with layoffs. It’s because if you run your team badly, no one wants to watch them. It’s because you can’t profit if you don’t run your business well, and in the NBA, running your business well is winning games. So the league needs to prove all this talk about competitive balance will result in small market teams competing for championships. The Oklahoma City Thunder may wind up proving that the same way the Spurs did in the last agreement, by simply running their team well. But given that New York, Chicago, LA, and Boston are set to compete for at least two more years of this agreement (and most people consider Miami a large market even if it does not qualify as one under metrics), it’ll be a steep climb. Are we going to see conference champions in Indiana, Milwaukee, Memphis, Portland? Because if not, if things remain the same, the owners will have some explaining to do.

Games didn’t need to be lost. The season didn’t need to be shortened. A deal could have been struck months ago. The owners already won this battle in September, but they kept pushing until they had nearly no option left. They got what they wanted, a system more under their control and a bigger cut of the pie. The players got what they wanted, the opportunity to earn their money. The fans got what they wanted, a season, even if it is shortened. Now it’s time to see whether everything the owners went to war over was worth it at all.

Larry Nance Jr. to wear father’s retired No. 22 Cavaliers jersey

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Larry Nance Jr. took on the 2018 NBA Dunk Contest in his dad’s old Phoenix Suns jersey, which was a nice nod to the father-son NBA duo. But Nance Jr. wanted to be able to wear his pop’s No. 22 jersey in Ohio despite the team retiring those digits some time ago.

Now, he has his wish.

According to the team, Nance Jr. will get to wear No. 22 the rest of the season. Nance Sr.’s banner will still hang at The Q in honor of his contribution to the franchise.

Via Twitter:

Will this spur a new round of jersey sales like the one prompted by Dwyane Wade‘s return to the Miami Heat? Probably not, although folks do dig those late-’80s and early-’90s Cavs uniforms. Perhaps the team should do a re-issue?

Shouts to the team for making a special accommodation for the Nance family. It’s nice to see a team not be so stiff about something this cool.

Report: NBA setting up confidential hotline for team employees to report workplace issues

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In the Dallas Mavericks organization, women who were being sexually harassed by the CEO and others did exactly what they were supposed to do — they reported the incidents to their supervisors and the head of Human Relations in the organization. Nothing happened. The men kept their jobs, the women kept on being harassed — some had their jobs threatened if they spoke out — and the old boys networked thrived.

The NBA is giving future employees in that situation another option. From Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

It’s a good first step.

The NBA is a league that prides itself on being progressive, promoting equality, and this Mavericks scandal is a black eye for the league on this front. While they will wait for the hired team of lawyers to finish their investigation before any punishment is handed out — and there will be punishment — the league needs to take proactive steps now. This is a good one. There needs to be more.

Already? Giannis Antetokounmpo says Joel Embiid tried to recruit him to Sixers

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The Greek Freak (now trademarked) Giannis Antetokounmpo is going to be a Buck for a while — he has three fully guaranteed years on his contract after this one, taking him until at least the summer of 2021. At that point, Milwaukee almost certainly will be able to offer him the designated player super max contract that will be hard to turn down. The Greek Freak is going to be in Milwaukee for a long time.

That didn’t stop Joel Embiid, who tried to recruit Antetokounmpo to Sixers during All-Star weekend. Via Matt Velazquez of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

“He told me I should trust the process and come play for Philly,” Antetokounmpo said with a chuckle, drawing a laugh. “That was my reaction — I just laughed.”

Of course, if somewhere down the line Antetokounmpo and Embiid team up some tinfoil hat conspiracy theorist will say “they have been planning this since 2018.”

Embiid probably did this tongue in cheek, but he is fearless about this stuff — remember a couple of summers ago he tried to recruit Kevin Durant through social media.

As for Antetokounmpo and the Sixers, nothing to see here, move along.

Rumor: Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert might not offer LeBron James no-trade clause in next contract

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The Cavaliers’ three deadline-day trades appear to have invigorated LeBron James, but a key issue remains as LeBron’s player option approaches: Dan Gilbert still owns the Cavs.

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

“LeBron wants to be in charge of everything, which is what puts him at odds with Dan,” one source said. “Dan wants to be in charge of everything.”

The belief is that Gilbert, having reasserted control after chasing out Griffin, will rebuff James’ request for a no-trade clause, or any other measures that give him leverage. And that will be enough to drive James away.

“Dan Gilbert’s not going to do what it takes to keep him,” the same source predicted. “Not a chance in hell he’s going to give him a no-trade clause, or let him dictate contract terms.”

LeBron’s no-trade clause might have been useful this season. When things got particularly bad in Cleveland, he affirmed he wouldn’t waive it. I doubt the Cavs would have dealt him regardless, but he made it a certainty.

But a no-trade clause was relevant only because LeBron signed a multi-year contract due to salary-cap rules relevant in 2016. With those no longer pertinent, he might go back to the 1+1 deals he first signed in his return to Cleveland. That’d give him an implicit no-trade clause, as those contracts are treated as one-year deals until the option is exercised, and players on one-year contracts who’d have early or full Bird Rights after can veto any trade.

Still, Gilbert taking this stance would matter if LeBron wants to sign long-term. An official no-trade clause would also carry over to LeBron’s next team if he approves a trade or in the second year of a 1+1 if he opts in. The implicit no-trade would not.

That could be enough for LeBron to demand the official no-trade clause – not just for the possibility it’s useful, but to show he can get it. He seems unwilling to give an inch. It’s about respect.

It also might be about stubbornness – both LeBron’s and Gilbert’s. This would be a ridiculous battleground for LeBron’s Cavaliers tenure to end on – just give LeBron whatever contract he wants – but it wouldn’t be the first ridiculous showdown between Gilbert and LeBron.