Charlotte Bobcats v Chicago Bulls

Michael Jordan always looking out for No. 23


Michael Jordan’s image is taking a beating for the first time… well, really since the 1980’s. After the reports surfaced that he’s the one leading the owners to push for 47 percent (or less!) of a BRI cut for the players, he’s become a target for angst regarding the lockout from those who have paid attention enough to understand the owners’ role in this.

It’s not so much that anyone’s surprised by Jordan’s stance, everyone understood there is no one more ruthless than Jordan. It’s just the rare instance when that side of him sees the light of day. Usually its hidden. His only public reveal of his petty vindictiveness and selfish approach was his Hall of Fame speech, because, really, that’s where you want to show the worst side of yourself. This seems somehow worse because of his complete flip-flop from when he was a player. But many people have rightfully pointed out, he was for himself then, and he’s for himself now. He wanted more money as a player, and more money as an owner. He’s not inconsistent, he’s just consistently self-centered, and in today’s society, there are those that think that’s “awesome,” or “admirable,” or at least understandable. There’s a certain cache to basically saying you only care about yourself. It’s brazen and bold. Compassion and compromise are seen as weak, and a lot of people hate weakness more than they hate brutality or ego. I’m not one of them, but there are people out there that feel that way. But then, of course, there’s this from Yahoo! Sports Friday night.

Had Michael Jordan spoken up at All-Star Weekend labor meeting, union had his famous Abe Pollin quote ready to read aloud. He stayed silent.Sat Nov 05 02:59:34 via web

Oh, the GOAT will screw you, he’s just not going to tell it to your face. After all, he needs you to keep pimping those shoes! Jordan Brand! Woo!

In some ways maybe the 80’s and 90’s were better without the kind of information exposure that comes with the internet. Then everyone could go on ignoring the realities of Jordan’s character in their pursuit of his deification. None of this will ever change the fact that he was the GOAT..That’s how good he was, his performance couldn’t be marred by any personal flaw.  But if Jordan is going to sell out the very group he championed, who look up to him, who helped build the culture that allows him to remain relevant, the least he could do is give them the fist pump or a shoulder shrug in person.

Jordan’s a winner. Jordan’s going to win. And for some people, that’s all they need to keep his name and image shiny and new.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.