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‘Melo wants CP3 in New York. Isn’t this why there’s a lockout?


This news is not surprising. In fact, I’d be shocked if Carmelo Anthony didn’t say he wants Chris Paul to play for the Knicks. It’s been on the radar since ‘Melo’s wedding and New Yorkers are salivating.

But it also has lockout undertones. It helps explains why we are here.

First, the quote from the New York Post.

“If it works out and he comes here and they allow him to come here, you’ll see a smile from ear to ear,” Anthony said during an appearance in Greenwich Village. “It’s not just me. It’s everybody [in New York]. If he decides to leave New Orleans and goes somewhere else, they’ll be feeling the same way I’m feeling.”

Paul can opt out of his contract with the Hornets after next season and become an unrestricted free agent. Virtually every team in the NBA would have interest; Paul is an elite point guard who you can build around.

But the thought of him leaving a small market for a big one like New York is part of the reason we are sitting without basketball a couple weeks away from when the season should have started. Splitting up the revenue is the big issue, but those “system” and “competitive balance” issues the owners keep talking about come back to things like this.

What LeBron James did — when he held all the power and went to a team loaded with talent — scared small market owners. What Carmelo Anthony did — by holding Denver hostage and forcing a trade to where he wanted — scared small market owners.

Those owners want to prevent that situation. They do not want more CP3 in New York and they want a system that makes sure of it.

You need to get a hold of one of about 10 elite players in the NBA if you are serious about winning an NBA title. Small market owners fear they cannot hold on to those guys and they point to LeBron and ‘Melo as evidence. Small market owners want a system where they think they can keep those guys and they want it to be easier to put move role players in and out around them.

It’s all a fallacy — those small market teams could keep the big stars if they handled it right (see Tim Duncan in San Antonio, see Kevin Durant in Oklahoma City). Also, small markets spend like big markets when they have these stars (see the Cavaliers with LeBron. And regardless of the system, free agents are going to go to contenders, big markets and warm weather cities. Why do you think the Lakers have been a free agent draw for years — fun city, great weather and marketing opportunities. Those things do not go away because of a luxury tax.

But sure, ‘Melo wants Chris Paul in New York. We’ve known that since his wedding. It’ just going to be a lot harder to pull off, now.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)

Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.

Kevin Love names NBA players he thinks could play in NFL


The majority of guys in the NBA are not built for the NFL. Blake Griffin the tight end makes a huge target for a free safety to line up. Kevin Durant is a little thin. Carmelo Anthony? Come on now.

But there are a few guys who might be able to, and on his show Dan Patrick asks Kevin Love about it today (see the video above). Then DP tries to take the obvious call of LeBron James off the table.

Nate Robinson as a DB? He’s athletic enough but at his height he would be a target for tall receivers. I like Dan Patrick’s suggestion of Russell Westbrook the free safety — he is certainly athletic enough.

Love also picked himself as a QB. Um, no. I’m not sure his outlet passing skills translate.