One other labor sticking point — contract lengths

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Make no mistake, the lockout is all about the money. It’s about the split of basketball related income. And while the ownership side preaches “competitive balance” what that really is about is money — keeping big market teams from spending it and using the luxury tax to distribute more of that money to smaller markets.

But there are other issues.

One that has come up more and more is contract length. Chris Sheridan explains it well at Sheridanhoops.com (the whole post is a great breakdown of where things stand).

Under the old system, a player could sign for no longer than five years unless he was a free agent and signed under the Larry Bird exception (re-signing your own free agent), which allowed for a six-year deal. The owners want to reduce the maximum contract length to four years for Bird players and three years for others, while the union wants five-year deals for Bird free agents and four-year deals for other players. The owners have also proposed a “SuperBird exception” that would allow a team to designate one player worthy of receiving an extra year on his contract. The union has accepted the concept to a certain degree, but the sides differ on the length of the contract that SuperBird player would get.

Contract lengths for teams comes back to the ability to protect them from themselves — the owners want to get out of bad deals more quickly. They want to be freed from their mistakes. It makes sense why the players would want to guarantee deals that go longer, so their players are more secure.

Personally, I like shorter deals. For one, it makes the game more of a meritocracy — play well and you get paid, don’t and you don’t. It gives good players more ability to shop their wares around as well, it means more player movement.

But if the owners want this for veterans, it should apply to rookies, too. Right now the best deal in the NBA are guys like Derrick Rose and Blake Griffin still playing on their rookie deals (which they are locked into for at least four seasons) rather than getting market value. Those elite rookies should get paid more quickly.

Basically, the contract length sword needs to cut both ways.

Harrison Barnes banks in game-winning, buzzer-beating 3-pointer (video)

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With the shot clock off in the fourth quarter and the game tied, Grizzlies big JaMychal Green put back Tyreke Evans‘ miss with a clutch flush. There’s a very fine line between ensuring the last shot and leaving time for an offensive rebound, and Memphis threated it almost perfectly.

Emphasis on “almost.”

The Grizzlies left the Mavericks 0.5 seconds, which Harrison Barnes used to bank in a 3-pointer – off a pinpoint bounce pass by Dennis Smith Jr. – to give Dallas a 95-94 win.

Heat snap Celtics’ 16-game winning streak

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky
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The Celtics didn’t have another comeback in them.

After overcoming a 13-point fourth-quarter deficit against the Mavericks on Monday to extend its winning streak to 16 games, Boston lost to the Heat tonight, 104-98. The streak ends as the NBA’s longest since the Hawks won 19 straight during the 2014-15 season.

The Celtics trailed Miami by 16 in the fourth quarter then cut the deficit to only one with three minutes left. But Dion Waiters hit back-to-back 3-pointers, helping the Heat pull away.

Goran Dragic (27 points) and Waiters (26 points) led Miami, which needed a reason to feel good after losing three of four to fall to 7-9.

The Celtics, on the other hand, still have a four-game cushion over the rest of the Eastern Conference. This might help them regain focus.

Serge Ibaka gets dunked on by Enes Kanter, hit in face by ball (video)

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Is Enes Kanter mad Serge Ibaka rifted with his family?

(No, not this family. That family.)

LeBron James blows wide-open dunk (video)

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J.R. Smith (slightly out of context): “We don’t start paying attention until after All-Star break.”