Derek Fisher, Billy Hunter

Fisher, Hunter respond to Stern with tough words of their own


After David Stern’s Magical Media Tour on Thursday and Friday, the players needed to respond before a mediator puts the lock on both sides next week. And after making an “armed and dangerous” reference, union executive director Billy Hunter continued along with union president Derek Fisher in pushing back hard against the commish. Various quotes from the AP and other sources:

Fisher expressed optimism that there would be a season, which is contrasted by the dour approach of both Stern and Hunter. Except Fisher’s assertion is based more on calling what he feels is Stern’s bluff.

“My gut tells me that there’s no way Commissioner Stern and the NBA would damage their business by making us miss a whole season,” Fisher said Friday after a union meeting at the Beverly Hilton.

Regarding David Stern’s assertion that the absence of a deal on Tuesday could lead the cancellation of games at Christmas, nearly two months away, Fisher shrugged it off as “arbitrary.”

“That’s an arbitrary deadline just to throw out on Commissioner Stern’s part,” Fisher said. “We don’t see it that way. That’s just arbitrary, with no other purpose than to sway player sentiment.”

Fisher also was quick to shut down talk of JaVale McGee’s comments about there being “guys ready to fold in the room,” a quote that McGee later denied on Twitter… despite about eight reporters having heard, and recorded, the comments. Fisher did not exactly cover McGee’s tail publicly.

“The person that spent the least amount of time in the room has no ability to make that statement,” Fisher said.

Billy Hunter commented that for nearly two years, the league had been pushing for “guaranteed profitability,” a term the union had shelved for several months, only to bring it back with a vengeance. Hunter said the union replied that a system that provided each NBA team with a guaranteed average profit of $10 to $30 million “simply did not exist.”

If you’re wondering if it was Rhetoric Day in the NBA Lockout, it was. Both sides were volleying shots at one another. But with McGee’s random and profoundly stupid comment, the NBPA still found a way to lose the day. The pressure is on players to comment whenever they’re at an event. The owners face no such pressure. And as a result, we’re learning why the union has been reticent to put its players first and forefront.

Finally, it’s important to note the disappointing turnout. Less than 30 players attended the meeting, with most players visiting colleges for Midnight Madness (Dwyane Wade, John Wall, DeMarcus Cousins just to name a few).

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.