South Florida All-Star Classic hosted by LeBron and Wade reminds us of what we’ll miss

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There have been plenty of recreational, pickup, and charity basketball games this summer that featured various groups of NBA stars showcasing their talents. But arguably none of them were as star-studded or as competitive as the South Florida All-Star Classic at Florida International University on Saturday, hosted by LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh.

Largely absent from this one was the high volume of crazy dunks, sick passes, and overall spectacular plays that we’ve come to expect when a majority of the game’s best players converge on a single court, but it was with good reason: The players seemed genuinely invested in whether or not their team would win or lose. As a result, not only was there actual defense played, but players went hard at each other, and with a more serious demeanor than we’ve seen at any of these types of games since the lockout began.

Carmelo Anthony, for example, seemed determined not to let Kevin Durant get going, and bodied him up with an aggressive and physical defensive display — even away from the ball — that we rarely see from the Knicks All-Star. Amar’e Stoudemire was consistent in providing weak-side defensive help, and had some physical possessions of his own against a noticeably-bulkier Bosh. And of course, Wade spent some time defending James, and did so with enough strength to make sure his Miami Heat teammate was unable to back him down in the post.

Add in the fact that the game was whistled so tightly down the stretch that James had conversations with the officials after seemingly every possession, and you definitely got the vibe that this game meant something. It came down to the wire, and featured a big-time clutch three-pointer from Anthony which tied it up for Team Wade and sent the festivities into overtime. That was when we saw LeBron try to attack Wade down low, but he had to settle for free throws after spinning past him and being fouled by Stoudemire coming over to help.

With Wade’s team having sealed the game by securing a four-point lead with just a couple of seconds to play, James ended it by pulling up for a jumper from half-court, which swished through the hoop as if he had only shot it from 15 feet out, as opposed to 50.

All in all, it was a competitive, fan-friendly event that was as close to real basketball as we’ve seen since the NBA concluded its season in June. The game benefited the Mary’s Court Foundation, established by Isiah Thomas and his wife in 2010 primarily for the purposes of youth academic success, increased school attendance and higher graduation rates.

source:  Nike provided the uniforms for the event, which had S.F.A.S.C. on the front, and BBNS where the names would normally be on the back — short for “BasketBall Never Stops,” the mantra the company has been repeating all summer as a reminder that for the players who truly love the game, there is no offseason.

Nike also used the event to debut the LeBron 9 “Cannon” edition, which James wore on the court, and which hit the Miami House of Hoops in limited quantities later that night. The Miami release was the first LeBron 9 to hit stores in North America, and was released exclusively in Miami as a sign of appreciation and respect for LeBron’s South Florida fans and community.

Afterward, James took the microphone at center court, and, surrounded by the rest of the stars who participated, gave a heart-felt message to the fans in attendance.

“There’s no us without you guys,” James said. “[Without] every last one of you guys, there’s no us as players. Thank you all. Thank you so much. We appreciate every last one of you.”

There was no doubting the sincerity of LeBron’s words. And the respect, effort, passion, and intensity he and the rest of the players brought to the game was a vivid yet all-too-brief reminder of exactly what we’ll be missing if the lockout drags on and regular season basketball is lost.

If you want to see the game, it is on demand at this link.

Report: Dante Cunningham re-signing with Pelicans

AP Photo/David Goldman
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An intriguing battle emerged late in free agency over Dante Cunningham.

The Pelicans and Timberwolves were desperate at small forward, and Cunningham rare contributor at the position still available. New Orleans even traded a second-rounder and cash to dump Quincy Pondexter and get far enough below the hard cap to take advantage of Cunningham’s Bird Rights.

That’ll pay off.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

It’s not the $3,106,500 Cunningham opted out of, but a $2.3 million salary beats his minimum ($2,106,470), which is all Minnesota could’ve offered.

That’s a great rate on someone who might be the Pelicans’ starting small forward, considering Solomon Hill‘s injury. Even if he plays behind Tony Allen on a team that starts small on the perimeter, Cunningham will reduce the time New Orleans must rely on also-rans.

Cunningham is probably better at power forward, but he can defend either position. He also has become a good enough 3-point shooter to credibly play small forward.

For the Pelicans, he’s a huge upgrade at a bargain price.

Kevin Durant cops to tweets, calls elements of them ‘childish’ and ‘idiotic’

AP Photo/Ben Margot
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Kevin Durant – tweeting in the third person, suggesting he forget to switch to a secret Twitter account – said he left the Thunder because he didn’t like the organization or playing for Billy Donovan and that Oklahoma City’s surrounding cast around himself and Russell Westbrook was lacking. Durant also appeared to have a second Instagram account he has used to insult critics.

Durant at TechCrunch:

Durant:

I do have other another Instagram account, but that’s just for my friends and family. So, I wouldn’t say I was using that to clap back at anybody.

But I use Twitter to engage with the fans. I think it’s a great way to engage with basketball fans.

But I happened to take it a little too far, and that’s what happens sometimes when I get into these basketball debates. Or what I really love is just to play basketball. I went a little too far.

And I don’t regret clapping back at anybody or talking to my fans on Twitter. I do regret using my former coach’s name and the former organization that I played for. That was childish. That was idiotic. All those type of words. I regret doing that, and I apologize to him for doing that.

But I don’t think I’ll ever stop engaging with my fans. I think they really enjoy it, and I think it’s a good way to connect us all. But I will scale back a little bit right now and just focus on playing basketball. So, I want to move on from that. It was tough to deal with yesterday. I was really upset with myself. But definitely want to move on and keep playing basketball. But I still want to interact with my fans, as well.

Durant can defend himself all he wants on social media. Fans, even those who detest him, do enjoy the interaction.

But an anonymous-looking account defending Durant provides no joy to those fans. They don’t – or at least didn’t – know they were interacting with the famous basketball star. This is something else entirely.

And it sure looks like Durant used his secret Instagram account to clap back at fans. Via SB Nation:

Durant denying that really makes it hard to accept this as him coming clean.

Mostly, Durant just opened himself to numerous follow-up questions:

Did he really dislike the Thunder organization? Did he really dislike playing for Donovan? If yes to either question, why? If no to either question, why say that? How does lying serve the fans he’s claiming he wants to engage?

Dwight Howard changes story, blames Magic front office for bringing up firing Stan Van Gundy

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While sipping from a can of Pepsi, Stan Van Gundy calmly explained to the assembled media that Magic management told him Dwight Howard wanted the coach fired. Then, an unsuspecting Howard walked up and put his arm around Van Gundy. Van Gundy slinked away, leaving Howard to answer questions.

That 2012 press conference was an all-time great NBA moment.

Lee Jenkins of Sports Illustrated:

To hear Howard tell it, he has been the victim of more subtle misunderstandings than Larry David. The excruciatingly awkward press conference, when Stan Van Gundy confirmed that Howard was lobbying the Magic front office to fire him, only for an unsuspecting Howard to join Van Gundy and deny what the coach claimed? “That previous summer, the front office asked me about Stan, and I told them I thought he was losing his voice with the team. But they were the ones who said they should start looking for other coaches.”

Howard already admitted in 2014 he told the Magic he thought Van Gundy should have been fired after the 2011 playoffs. Howard even griped that Orlando didn’t listen to him!

I get that Howard is (again) trying to rehabilitate his image, but he has to do a better job of keeping his story straight.

Bulls hire Doug Collins as senior advisor

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Doug Collins burns out. Burns out his players, burns out himself. That was his reputation through 11 seasons coaching the Bulls, Pistons, Wizards and 76ers.

When Collins left Philadelphia in 2013, he declared he was done coaching. There was just too much pressure, he said.

Perhaps, Collins has found a role that better suits him.

Vincent Goodwill of CSN Chicago:

In a surprise announcement, the Chicago Bulls have brought former coach Doug Collins back into the fold, naming him a senior advisor to Executive Vice President John Paxson.

Even among NBA personnel, Collins was a basketball expert in his time. Whether he has kept up in a rapidly evolving league is an open question.

It won’t hurt having his voice in the room. It might hurt if the Bulls lean too heavily on it.

Hopefully, everyone entered this arrangement for the right reasons. Paxson played for Collins in Chicago. Collins’ son – Chris Collins – coaches nearby Northwestern. An overreliance on comfort won’t yield positive results. The Bulls need forward-thinkers, not just familiar faces. Successful executives put in a lot of work and aren’t just hanging around to be close with family.

This hire probably won’t move the needle much, but there’s certainly a chance it could – in either direction.