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NBA will cancel first games next week after talks see little progress

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Tuesday was billed as they most crucial day of NBA labor talks, but the results after four hours looked exactly like every other meeting over the past several weeks:

There was incremental progress, but the two sides remain an ocean apart. And in that ocean could be a sinking NBA season that will see regular season games cancelled next week.

After Tuesday there are no more meetings scheduled both NBA league officials and union leaders said. No more meetings this week when the calendar demands it, and union executive director Billy Hunter said it could be a month before the two sides do sit down.

Both sides said the rest of the preseason has been cancelled. Commissioner David Stern said that come next Monday the league will have no choice but to cancel the first two weeks of the regular season. As the two sides are not meeting before then, the first two weeks are toast.

Usually once regular season games are missed, both sides tend to harden their positions for a while before coming back to the table. David Stern said, “We have a reset here.”

Folks, settle in and make yourselves comfortable. We’re going to be at this a while.

Here is what NBA union president Derek Fisher said, according to Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski on twitter:

Fisher: “today was not the day to get this done. Not able to get close enough to close the gap.”

Fisher: “we find ourselves where we expected to be: a lockout that may jeopardize a part, or our whole season…”

The big issue remains the split of “basketball related income” (BRI), which is basically all the money that comes into the league through tickets, television and other sources (like a percentage of arena sponsorship).

In the last labor deal the players got 57 percent and Fisher said the union offered to go down to 53 percent, which works out to more than $1 billion reduction over six years, but were told that is not enough. Fisher said the owners’ latest offer was 47 percent, something Stern confirmed. Each percentage point works out to about $40 million a year, which leaves the two sides $240 million apart in the first year of the deal alone.

Stern said that he asked if a 50/50 split of BRI (under the old definition of BRI) would be acceptable to the players, but while he was polling his owners the players said no. That’s some spin by Stern there — we don’t know that the owners would have been okay with it, and a 50/50 split means the players give up 7 percent from their starting point and the owners just 4 percent.

Stern said that the cancellation of the preseason means a $200 million loss for owners and they would have to factor that in. (The reason the NFL labor deal got done in time for the preseason is those owners lost $200 million a week without preseason games, it’s a cash cow for them and they didn’t want to miss out, while NBA owners still take a hard line.) Stern said that is an economic hit for the owners.

Fisher stood at the podium flanked by stars such as Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce. Once again, the union was trying to look unified. If it really is or not remains to be seen.

Hunter also said union leadership would have to take another look at decertification of the union (the breaking up of the union, a tactic used by the NFL union). For the NBA players association, that has always been the plan of last resort. That they are discussing it shows where things stand.

There was no serious hope for NBA fans out of today’s meetings. In the middle of the day there was some buzz of hope after Metta World Peace — the artist formerly known as Ron Artest — tweeted that the lockout was over. Even though he was not in New York. He then said he was joking and he was filming a shoe commercial and getting to put that jersey on. It was all very Artest. And not that funny. Not to fans, not to the thousands of arena employees and others around the nation about to start missing paychecks that mean more to them feeding their families than the massive ones NBA players get.

Report: Equipment staffer punched by Blake Griffin no longer works for Clippers

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin stands on the court as equipment manager Matias Testi, left, stands behind the bench during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016, in Los Angeles. Griffin broke his hand last month when he punched Testi in the face. The Clippers won 105-86. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
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Blake Griffin broke his hand punching Clippers equipment manager Matias Testi in January.

Make that former Clippers equipment manager Matias Testi.

TMZ:

The L.A. Clippers equipment staffer who was punched in the face by Blake Griffin during a fight in Toronto earlier this year is off the team — and will NOT be back for the ’16/’17 season … TMZ Sports has learned.

We spoke with a rep for the Clippers who confirmed Matias Testi “no longer works for the team.”

#Family

Writer recants report of Kevin Durant telling Russell Westbrook he’d re-sign with Thunder

OAKLAND, CA - MARCH 03:  Kevin Durant #35 and Russell Westbrook #0 of the Oklahoma City Thunder talk to head coach Billy Donovan during their game against the Golden State Warriors at ORACLE Arena on March 3, 2016 in Oakland, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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The report that Kevin Durant told Russell Westbrook he’d re-sign with the Thunder before choosing the Warriors?

Never mind.

Royce Young of ESPN:

I misspoke in saying that Durant specifically told Westbrook he was coming back.

Warriors/Brazil center Anderson Varejao to miss Olympics with back injury

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 31: Dan Clark #13 of Great Britain shoots over Anderson Varejao #11 of Brazil in the Men's Basketball Preliminary Round match between Great Britain and Brazil on Day 4 of the London 2012 Olympic Games at Basketball Arena on July 31, 2012 in London, England.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Center Anderson Varejao will miss the Olympics for host Brazil because of a herniated disc in his lower back.

The Golden State Warriors announced the injury Wednesday and say that Varejao should be ready for the start of training camp but will not be healthy enough to play in the Olympics. Varejao recently experienced back pain while training with the Brazilian National Team and returned to California to be examined by Dr. Robert Watkins earlier this week.

Varejao averaged 2.6 points and 2.3 rebounds in 22 games after signing with the Warriors on Feb. 22. He re-signed with the team earlier this month.

Suns add Jay Triano, Tyrone Corbin to coaching staff

Jay Triano
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PHOENIX (AP) — Phoenix Suns coach Earl Watson completed his staff Wednesday, naming Jay Triano associate head coach and Tyrone Corbin and Nate Bjorkgren assistant coaches.

Triano spent the last four seasons as assistant coach with the Portland Trail Blazers, including Watson’s final season as a player in 2013-14. The first Canadian-born head coach in NBA history when he directed Toronto, he also is the coach of Canada’s national team.

Corbin was Sacramento’s interim head coach for 28 games in 2014-15. He played the Suns in 1987-89.

Bjorkgren remains with the Suns after spending last season as assistant coach/player development coordinator. He also was head coach of the Suns’ NBA Summer League team the past two years.

The Suns also named Marlon Garnett assistant coach/player development coordinator, and Scott Duncan and Jason Fraser player development coaches.