National Basketball Association commissioner David Stern answers questions from members of the media regarding failed contract negotiations between the NBA and the players association in New York

Monday NBA labor meetings set table for do-or-die Tuesday


Here is where things finally stand — tomorrow is the big deal, best offer, drop-dead date for the NBA labor negotiations. If things go poorly on Tuesday, well, hope you have some NBA games stored on your DVR to watch.

There was a five-hour meeting Monday between commissioner David Stern and the heads of the NBA players union that was described as setting the table for a meeting Tuesday that starts at high noon. Which sounds suspiciously like nothing really happened Monday from where I sit. About 10 owners and a number of players are expected to attend Tuesday in New York.

If serious progress cannot be made, you can expect the rest of the preseason to be cancelled and the postponement of the regular season will be right behind it.

Which again leaves me feeling like Charlie Brown running up to kick the football. With David Stern as Lucy. When was the last time one of these big meetings went well?

It sounds like on Tuesday they are finally going to get around to the elephant in the room — the split of Basketball Related Income (or BRI). In the old deal the players got 57 percent and they have come as far down in their offers as 53 percent while the owners have offered only 48 percent to the players. In real dollars, that’s a $200 million difference in year one of a six year deal.

David Stern had this to say, via Ken Berger of (on twitter).

“We’re apart on the split. But we know that the answer lies somewhere between where they were and where we are.”

“I think if there’s a will we’ll be able to deal with both the split and with the system issues.”

“Each side has reserved its right to be where it is, knowing that there is a heart-to-heart that will ultimately take place.”

You can take that as the honest truth or as Stern setting the table to smack the players not having the will to get a deal done if he doesn’t like the offer. Even though the players have given more so far than the owners.

Union president Derek Fisher echoed the same sentiment, that Tuesday was going to be a key day in the negotiations.

Come back to PBT tomorrow, we’ll get you the news. Even if we feel like Charlie Brown flying helplessly through the air.

76ers owner: Brett Brown deserves an ‘A’

Brett Brown
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Only one person in NBA history has coached as many games as Brett Brown and had a worst winning percentage.

The 76ers coach, who sports a 37-127 record, is trumped by just Brian Winters. Winters went 36-148 with the expansion Grizzlies and during interim stint guiding the Warriors.

Brown is entering the third season of his four-year contract, and Philadelphia general manager Sam Hinkie has been mum about an extension.

76ers owner Josh Harris is taking a similar approach, but he also says a lot of nice things about Brown.

Harris, via John Finger of CSN Philly:

“It’s probably not appropriate for me to talk about specifics about what the negotiations are with him,” Harris said during a media conference on Thursday at the team’s training camp at Stockton College.

“I give Brett an A for the job he’s done,” Harris said. “He’s been an incredible player development person, which is what we need at this point in time. He’s a great person to be around. He’s enthusiastic and he’s a born coach and a leader of men. I’m very impressed with Brett and I hope and expect Brett to be around the team for a very long time.”

Brown has done a fantastic job keeping this team engaged through losing and developing its young players. It’s not his fault Philadelphia stinks. Tanking is an organizational decision.

But the 76ers aren’t tanking forever, and soon, they’ll require a different type of coaching.

Is Brown up for it? No idea. He hasn’t had any chance to prove it.

After all he’s done, though, he probably deserves a chance to find out.

Thabo Sefolosha found not guilty

Thabo Sefolosha
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Thabo Sefolosha clearly believed in his innocence.

The Hawks wing rejected a plea deal of only day of community service and six months probation. That probably would have been easier than a trial.

But Sefolosha opted to fight the charges – misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Today, he was vindicated.

Robert Silverman:

Sefolosha, who missed the playoffs due to a leg injury that seemingly occurred during his arrest, has made his case clear: New York police targeted him because he’s black. Given everything else we know about policing habits, that’s certainly believable.

We’ve also seen video of multiple officers literally pulling Sefolosha in different directions and one striking him in the leg with a nightstick. We don’t know what preceded that video, but especially given the information revealed at trial, it’s difficult to justify that use of force.

This verdict probably sets up Sefolosha’ to sue the NYPD.