NBA basketball players Wade, Anthony and Paul gesture to fans as they arrive at a promotional event at an outdoor basketball court in Beijing

NBA Lockout: BRI is still the elephant in the room

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The NBA labor negotiations’ approach to the issue of BRI was pretty simple on Saturday. See no evil, hear no evil, see no conflict, make no progress. Both sides took BRI off the table and focused on systemic issues, trying to “break down the mountain” as Derek Fisher put it. It wasn’t a bad approach. Unfortunately, the best case scenario would have been getting to third base. Everything but. The fact that they’re still “miles apart” in the words of Billy Hunter only makes the situation worse. Because what looms over the systemic horizon is the grand mountain of cash.

It’s been interesting to see the sides develop. Since the beginning, experts have said the debate was going to come down to BRI, to cold hard cash, the money split between the two sides. I’ve been among those peering into some sort of mythical scenario in which money wasn’t everything. The talk from both sides indicated that the hard cap, the exceptions, the system was as big of an issue as BRI. And were you to ask them on the street, both sides would tell you the same. But what we’ve seen the last two weeks indicates a pattern. There’s movement to be had in terms of how spending is limited. There’s movement to be had in the structure. But the lockout’s only going to end when the two sides settle BRI. And that’s not happening any time soon.

From Howard Beck of the New York Times:

Hunter and Fisher both make it clear that a huge gulf remains. Owners have not moved off proposal avg 46% for players.Sat Oct 01 22:34:29 via UberSocial for BlackBerry

 

On Friday night, Yahoo! Sports reported this from the players’ side:

Wade, James and Paul were at the forefront of a strong players presence at a Park Avenue hotel for Friday’s contentious bargaining session. In a private union meeting prior to the bargaining session with owners, James kept reiterating to the group of elite players that they shouldn’t give back a greater share of the league’s basketball-related income (BRI) than what they’d already conceded in previous negotiations.

“We’re all together on 53 [percent], right?” James said. “All together on 53 right?”

via Wade, LeBron make stand in labor meeting – NBA – Yahoo! Sports.

The owners started somewhere south of 44 percent, the players started at the previous CBA’s mark of 57 percent. The players have gone down four percent, the owners have gone up two. For the owners to be pushing for a sub-50 mark for the players is as nuts as the previous sticking point of a $54 million hard cap. They knew they weren’t getting that. They know they’re not getting a plus-50 BRI for themselves. The very best case is a 50-50 split for them, and that would only come after, oh, losing an entire year, killing the sport and ruining the fandom of millions. Can they do it? Absolutely.

But this is the issue. It’s possible the owners are just waiting for the players to come down to 52 or 51. It’s possible the players are just waiting for the owners to come out of the freaking sub-basement. Until there’s movement from either side on what is apparently the abject limits for either side at this point.

It’s about money. It’s always been about money. It will always be about money.

Enjoy that, fans.

Suns GM: Phoenix will likely preserve most of $13 million cap space into season

Ryan McDonough
AP Photo/Matt York
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The Suns have more than $13 million in cap space remaining.

Don’t count on them spending it anytime soon.

Phoenix general manager Ryan McDonough, via Paul Coro of The Arizona Republic:

“I’d be surprised if we spent a lot of that cap space now or over the summertime,” Suns General Manager Ryan McDonough said. “More likely, we’ll preserve most, if not all of it, and go into the season and look at either in-season signings or probably more likely in-season trades that are lopsided where we take back more money than we send out. There are a decent amount of advantages to operating as an under-the-cap team in terms of player aggregation and trades and things like that.”

There’s certainly a logic to maintaining cap space for in-season deals. But the value is far less this year, when multiple teams will have room due to the skyrocketing salary cap. If they have their eyes on getting positive assets in salary dumps, the Suns will have to compete with other teams — and settle for weaker positive assets.

That still might be the right course if Phoenix doesn’t like any remaining free agents. (This removes one possible destination for Maurice Harkless, whose standoff with the Trail Blazers appears more likely to drag on.)

The Suns have 15 players — the regular-season roster limit — though John Jenkins and Alan Williams have unguaranteed deals. Phoenix could sign another low-priced player or two to compete in training camp, but that’s small potatoes. The Suns appear set to hoard their cap space.

The catch: This is also what cheap teams say. They hide their frugality by saying they’re maximizing flexibility. It’s impossible to tell the difference at this stage. So, keep an eye on Phoenix’s in-season moves.

Brandon Ingram far from soft, but going to have to get stronger to do what he wants in NBA

Los Angeles Lakers' Brandon Ingram shoots against the Cleveland Cavaliers during the first half of an NBA summer league basketball game, Thursday, July 14, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Associated Press
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When you see Brandon Ingram in person, you can’t help but have your first thought be “man, is he skinny.”

When he starts to play then you see why he went No. 2 in last June’s draft to the Lakers — he has a smooth, fluid game, can shoot the three, good IQ,  he even ran the offense at points, and looked like a modern NBA four who can do a lot of damage down the line in the league.

Once he gets stronger. Teams at the NBA Summer League tried to cover him often with shorter but physically stronger players — the Sixers’ Jerami Grant, for example — and Ingram struggled with that. It will only get worse once real NBA games start.

Just don’t confuse his physical strength with being soft, scouts and coaches of other teams told Broderick Turner of the Los Angeles Times.

“It’s a difference between being soft and being weak. He’s just weak right now. He’s not soft, by any stretch of the imagination,” a Western Conference head coach said of Ingram. “The kid is skilled. He’s got a good basketball IQ. He’s going to be more than fine. I think the Lakers got themselves a big-time player who is going to be around a long time.”

“I saw a good-looking prospect,” an Eastern Conference scout said of Ingram. “There were some games where he excelled, and there were some games where he struggled. But overall . . . he’s a matchup nightmare.”…

“Every time somebody got physical with him or leaned on him, he just wilted. He just kind of folded. And he was kind of like that the rest of the summer league,” a Western Conference assistant coach said of Ingram. “It’s going to be interesting to see how he adjusts to the NBA. The summer league is not the league.”

It’s going to take Ingram a season or two to put his imprint on the NBA. He’s got to get stronger, and like every rookie he’s got to see how his game and skill set fits in the league. What can he do, what should he stay away from.

What you had to like if you’re a Laker fan is how hard he continued to play, how he got better as Summer League went on. Then he stayed in Las Vegas as was part of the USA Basketball select team, where he was pushed around by the Olympians and challenged by the other guys just starting in the NBA. It’s a great learning experience. Both those situations were also chances to bond with Laker star D'Angelo Russell, both on and off the court.

There’s a lot to like with Ingram. Now someone get that kid a protein shake.

 

Report: Some in Chris Bosh camp suspicious of Heat’s intentions

CHARLOTTE, NC - APRIL 25:  Chris Bosh #1 of the Miami Heat watches on from the bench against the Charlotte Hornets during game four of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena on April 25, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images
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Pat Riley said he’s open to Chris Bosh playing this season.

Not everyone is convinced of the Heat president’s authenticity.

Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald:

Some in the Bosh camp remain angry and suspicious of the Heat’s intentions, wondering if Miami was motivated by clearing cap space. A Heat source insists this is not the case, that Miami wants him to play if doctors are comfortable with it.

An NBA-employed friend says Bosh very much wants to play and believes he should be cleared. If the Heat fights him on this, it wouldn’t be surprising if Bosh takes this issue to the players union

one issue that has been discussed is whether Bosh should come off blood thinners or continue taking them, according to a person briefed on the matter.

If Bosh comes off the medication this summer, there’s no reason why he couldn’t play.

But even if he stays on the thinners, Bosh has tried to convince the Heat to allow him to play while taking a new medication that would be out of his system in 8 to 12 hours, or by game-time, thus lessening or eliminating the inherent risks of playing a contact sport while on thinners.

It’s hard to believe the Heat have nefarious intentions — not just because they reportedly expect Bosh to play next season, but because a salary-cap workaround would likely fail.

If Bosh goes a year without playing (last game:Feb. 9), Miami waives him and a doctor approved by the NBA and players union says Bosh’s condition is career-ending, the Heat could exclude Bosh’s salary from team salary. He’d still get paid. He just wouldn’t count toward the cap.

So, the $75,868,170 Bosh is owed the next three years is protected. It’s just a matter of whether Miami frees cap space.

But even the Heat sitting Bosh for a year and convincing a union-approved doctor of Bosh’s inability to safely play wouldn’t be enough.

If Bosh plays 25 games for another team after an injury exclusion, his salary would be put back on Miami’s books. That might allow the Heat temporary cap room to sign someone, but with Bosh’s salary applied, their luxury-tax bill would be prohibitively enormous.

So, we’re probably back to the previous questions:

Can Bosh safely play while on blood thinners? Probably not, though there might not be total agreement on that.

Does Bosh need to continue taking blood thinners? That’s a much more complicated question. Hence, the lack of a resolution to this issue.

Kevin Durant better get used to it: He was booed at Team USA introductions in Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 24:  Kevin Durant #5 of the United States dribbles upcourt against China during the second half of a USA Basketball showcase exhibition game at Staples Center on July 24, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant is a villain to many now.

Including some delusional fans in Los Angeles, who thought he might come to the Lakers (the real question becomes: is Jim Buss in this group). He didn’t even give the Lakers a meeting.

So he got some boos when being introduced before the Team USA rout of China at Staples Center Sunday (there may have been some Clippers fans in that booing group too). It was a mixed reaction, but no doubt there was some people letting him hear it.

He can expect to hear a lot more of this next season as he and his Warriors teammates travel around the league. Plenty of people are now rooting against him.

As for why the Lakers didn’t even get a meeting with KD, he had a very reasonable reason (something he said while in Las Vegas for the USA training camp last week.

“Nothing against the Lakers, but I already had my mind set on who I wanted to talk to,” Durant said. “I really respect their team. I just thought they were a couple years away from where I wanted to be.”