Fashion's Night Out At Macy's Herald Square

Amar’e Stoudemire is eating kosher (mostly) and very well


I really need to get myself a personal chef.

That’s one of my take aways from a profile of Knicks star Amar’e Stoudemire in the new issue of Bon Appetit (a great find by KD at Ball Don’t Lie).

Stoudemire has his own chef (Max Hardy), a guy who won over Stoudemire with a midnight feast of lobster. As Stoudemire has explored his spiritual roots the past year, the chef has moved to making more and more kosher food. Stuff that sounds better than the warmed-over chicken I just had for lunch.

Now Hardy buys kosher beef and chicken and avoids pork—though there are allowances. “If Amar’e had a good game, he might want crab legs, or maybe lobster macaroni and cheese.”

One thing that never varies is Stoudemire’s commitment to eating healthfully during the week and living it up a bit on weekends. When he was growing up in Florida, he recalls, “my aunt always cooked a huge meal on Sundays. I want to keep that tradition alive here. So on Sundays, Chef Max lays it all out, and a bunch of friends come over. We call it Soul Food Sundays.”

This particular evening, Hardy is making cornmeal-dusted catfish with tomato grits and sweet potato waffles with buttermilk fried chicken.

Again, I need to get myself a personal chef. And a massive apartment in New York, while I’m at it.

This story highlights why Stoudemire came to NYC — the life of a Knick when the team is good is about as sweet as it gets. Guys with vineyards swing by for dinner and bring their good stuff. Phoenix is a fine city, but it’s just not the same. Stoudemire is enjoying life at the top.

If the Knicks struggle out of the gate this season, he’ll learn about the other side of New York, too.

Carmelo Anthony says he can play at high level 4-5 more years

USA Basketball Men's National Team Training Camp

Carmelo Anthony can flat-out score the rock — that has never been the question. Even hurting last season for many of the 40 games he played, he averaged 24.2 points a game, had a true shooting percentage of 53.1 percent (right near the league average) while having the entire weight of the Knicks offense on his shoulders (32.2 usage rate, fifth highest in the NBA). When people (or players) talk about him being overrated, the discussion turns to defense or if he makes his teammates better. But there should be no doubt Anthony is an elite scorer.

He thinks he will be for a while longer — like another five years. Via Ian Begley of ESPN:

In fact, the 31-year-old Knicks star is confident that he can play at a high level for the next “four or five years.”

“Without a doubt. Without a doubt,” Anthony said after the Knicks’ final training camp practice on Saturday.

The Knicks better hope that’s true, they already made that bet with that massive five-year contract they gave him last summer.

Anthony’s age combined with him coming off knee surgery have a lot of people — myself included — expecting him to take a step back. Not a big one, but he is coming up at the point in his career where some open shots he used to get are now contested because he’s half-a-step slower, and some of those looks don’t fall as often. His jumper isn’t suddenly going to look like Rajon Rondo‘s, ‘Melo is going to get his points, but he may not be as efficient.

Fortunately, the Knicks have an improved supporting cast around him this season. That should take some offensive load off his shoulders, and maybe the Knicks offense will see better ball movement and start to resemble the triangle. If it’s just more isolation Anthony, it’s not going to be pretty.

Kings pick up option on G Ben McLemore

Ben McLemore, Rodney Hood
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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) The Sacramento have picked up the 2016-17 option on guard Ben McLemore‘s contract.

General manager Vlade Divac announced the move Saturday.

McLemore was Sacramento’s first-round pick in 2013. He averaged 12.1 points, 2.9 rebounds and 1.7 assists last season.