AEG acknowledges interest in Sacramento Entertainment and Sports Complex

1 Comment

It wasn’t a matter of if, it was when.

Anschutz Entertainment Group, known better as the stadium and arena operations giant AEG, acknowledged for the first time Friday that they might provide “assistance” to Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson and the Think Big Sacramento coalition in their quest for an arena, according to the Sac Bee.

AEG’s involvement with the arena initiative was about as secret as LeBron’s hairline, but without the illusion of a headband to try and hide it.

According to sources, that ‘assistance’ should come in the form of tens of millions of dollars of up-front money, assuming of course that AEG can come to terms with the City of Sacramento, the Kings, and the NBA.

In return they would get profits from operating the arena, and using the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon they could also see benefits from the fact that their partially-owned subsidiary, the ICON-David Taylor Group, is providing the logistical backbone for Think Big Sacramento and its proposals. Taylor, whose development company David Taylor Interests would like to build the arena, has also expressed interest in buying up properties located near the arena. And with AEG, Taylor, Darius Anderson, and many other committee members also having business interests near the arena, a mini-L.A. Live type project with the Kings as the epicenter is where the smart money is heading.

This public statement from AEG is just one of many baby steps the Think Big Sacramento coalition will take, as it otherwise sprints to cultivate a $387 million Entertainment and Sports Complex (ESC) that will keep its anchor tenant from leaving for Anaheim. KJ’s coalition has a self-imposed, though painfully realistic deadline of December 30th to get a funding plan approved so the city can meet the NBA’s deadline of March 1, 2012 to have funding in place.

The next test for the Think Big coalition will come today when the Sacramento City Council will either approve, table, or reject a $550,000 request for lawyers and consultants to be used to officially vet the project and negotiate with third parties such as the NBA and the Maloofs. The city council will also be asked to vote whether to give the ICON-David Taylor Group the authority to start negotiating on behalf of the city with operators.

Here’s betting that the operator is AEG.

As for Kings fans’ chances of keeping their team, Tuesday’s vote will be the first time the city council, who will ultimately decide the project’s fate, will be asked to part with cold, hard cash. If any of them are opposed to it, saying so before the city spends a half-million dollars would make some sense. With no real public opposition being shown by the council so far it is likely that they will approve the request, and see what numbers come through the pipeline and how the public reacts to them.

If the request is approved, negotiations will commence with the aforementioned parties to determine what level of private funding can be secured, and in turn what level of public funding will be needed. Sources from Think Big Sacramento are in agreement that a public vote to generate funds for an ESC would be an abject failure, so they don’t plan on using public funds that would trigger a public vote.

Because of this limitation they’ve taken a kitchen sink approach where everything from hotel fees, ticket surcharges, cell phone towers on the arena, and the sale of city lands have all come into play. Local kids have taken to selling lemonade to raise funds, and Think Big may just need it. But finding enough money to hit the magic number isn’t their only challenge. Making sure that the city council is comfortable voting ‘yes’ for a controversial measure is job No. 1.

So far, the Think Big coalition campaign has been run to a presidential degree, with traveling town hall meetings around the region and a media awareness campaign not seen before in arena politics. While there will always be skeptics and opponents of such a measure, you wouldn’t have known it by the last city council meeting where every public commenter was in support of an arena and no dissident voices could be found.

Today we’ll see if the first one shows up.

Spurs to give Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili Friday night off in Denver

Manu Ginobili, Harrison Barnes, Tim Duncan
Leave a comment

The Spurs are 12-3 and comfortably in second place in the West, they have the best defense in the NBA allowing just 93.8 points per 100 possessions, and they have a top-10 offense to go with it.

So, time to start making sure guys are rested.

That is the first night of a back-to-back, with former Spurs’ assistant coach Mike Budenholzer and his Atlanta Hawks coming to San Antonio on Saturday. Popovich is saving his two veterans for that game.

Duncan and Ginobili have looked like they found the fountain of youth this season. Duncan is taking on less of the offense but has been very efficient in those moments. Ginobili has the impact he did a few years back in his bench role.

What Gregg Popovich cares about is them playing like that come the postseason. So they will rest on Friday.

Brandon Armstrong impersonates Ray Allen (video)

2014 NBA Finals - Game Five
Leave a comment

Ray Allen is retired-ish, but he’ll always be running through screens – in our mind and in this video.

Celtics draft pick Marcus Thornton gets beer dumped on head during Australian game (video)

Marcus Thornton, Will Cherry

The Celtics drafted Marcus Thornton with No. 45 pick in the 2015 NBA draft. That essentially entitled him to the required tender – a one-year contract offer, surely unguaranteed at the minimum.

Thornton rejected that, which is almost always a mistake.

Rejecting the tender is a favor to the drafting team, which gets to keep the player’s exclusive rights for a year. If Thornton tries to join the NBA now, he’s stuck negotiating with only the Celtics.

By accepting the tender, the player typically gets one of two outcomes. He either plays on that contract and draws an NBA salary or he gets waived. But even getting waived is better than rejecting the tender, because at least the player becomes a free agent and can negotiate with any team.

Players who reject the tender go to another league and play for less money. In Thornton’s case, that mean Australia.

How’s that going?

(Almost) never reject the required tender as a second-round pick.

Byron Scott says they just have to get Kobe Bryant better looks

Kobe Bryant, Joe Johnson, Byron Scott

Kobe Bryant is averaging 15.2 points a game at age 37. It’s just taking him 16.4 shots per game to get there. After his 1-of-14 shooting performance against the Warriors the other night — with too much isolation and too many plays run just for him — there has been a lot of talk about his shot. With reason, this is his shot chart so far this season.

Kobe shotchart season

So what do the Lakers’ do? Get Kobe to shoot less and get the ball in the hands of the young stars they supposed to be developing more? Nah.

They just need to get Kobe better looks, Scott told the Los Angeles Times.

“I know his mentality is that he can still play in this league,” Scott said. “And we feel the same way….

“Obviously he’s struggling right now with his shot, and I think everybody can see that,” Scott said. “So it’s trying to get him in better position to be able to have an opportunity to knock those shots down on a consistent basis. That’s No. 1.

“I don’t know if it’s his legs. I don’t think so. Again, our conversations are pretty blunt. … He tells me when he is tired and he tells me when he’s not tired. And the last few days, he said he feels great. So, I don’t think it’s a matter of him being tired or his legs being tired. I think it’s a matter of his timing being a little off.”

Yes, how could it be his legs? It’s not like he’s a 37-year-old with more than 55,000 NBA minutes played, and coming off an Achilles rupture and major knee surgery.

Honestly, I hope the Lakers and Kobe find a balance soon, because they have become just hard to watch. And I don’t want Kobe to go out this way.