Tyson Chandler of the Dallas Mavericks c

Winderman: NBA’s post-lockout startup time can be quick

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Based on the slow-go turn in lockout negotiations, it is safe to say that we’re officially on the clock, a backwards timetable to the earliest-possible start to the NBA season.

Those involved in the process are virtually unanimous in a two-week timetable being necessary for agreement-into-final draft and then a union vote.

Conversations with others indicate that a one-week schedule for camp/exhibitions is feasible, if only because while rosters still have to be rounded out, there are a significant number of teams that not only have their starting lineups in place, but many of those lineups are the same that ended last season.

In some respects, the timing of this 2011 lockout could not have been better, with this having already set up as an offseason of continuity for many teams.

But what about free agency, a process that normally runs for three months, a typically measured, methodical approach by front offices?

Don’t overstate the process. A week sounds about right. And with most teams merely looking for complementary pieces, you conceivably could have a workable resumption even with teams fiddling with rosters through the opening days of the regular season.

Foremost, with a rookie wage scale already assured in a new agreement, draft picks could be signed immediately, as was the case even when the moratorium period was in place in previous agreements.

As for free agents, consider that in the last free-agent signing period, 15 players were signed on the opening day of free agency in 2010 and 44 in the first week of the process.

While an argument could be made that the seven-day signing moratorium positioned teams for such swift movement, an argument could be made that teams, in effect, this time already have had a three-month moratorium period to mull such considerations.

Further, while the previous agreement had the mid-level exception, bi-annual exception and all varieties of Bird Rights, the new agreement, one that at the least will have hard-cap characteristics, may have none of them.

In other words, agents won’t have as much ability or need to shop offers. There will be teams with cap space, teams with minimum-scale offers, and perhaps incumbent teams still with some sort of Bird Rights to retain their own free agents.

The reality is teams have had more than ample time for Plans A, B, C, all the way to the ones that forecast Kenyon Martin, J.R. Smith and Wilson Chandler to instead play in China.

Put it this way, one agent confided he already has a $4 million offer in place from a team for his middling swingman.

Which means either people already are talking, or plenty of advance work was set in motion before the July 1 onset of the lockout.

No, you’re not allowed to discuss such matters during a lockout. But you also were never allowed to discuss potential free-agency machinations prior to July 1 of any other year, and, well, we’ll leave that conspiracy conversation for those who want to revisit elements of LeBron, Wade, Bosh.

Basically, in the wake of slow-moving negotiations, there still can be a fast-moving free-agency process.

So while pondering those reverse calculations about how quickly meaningful games can be played upon an agreement, don’t overstate the personnel game.

Those plans are in much better shape than, apparently, any plan to actually end the lockout itself.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

Aaron Gordon both legs over the mascot, ball-under-the-legs dunk (VIDEO)

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TORONTO — Zach LaVine won the NBA All-Star Saturday Dunk Contest, but in an epic night for my money this was the single best dunk.

Orlando’s Aaron Gordon broke ground with this one — guys have jumped over mascots and other players before (and a Kia hood), but by splitting their legs apart. Gordon just put both legs over Stuff (that’s the mascot’s name, Stuff the Magic Dragon, I don’t make this up) — and took the ball off the mascot’s head, went under his legs, and threw it down.

Insane.

Gordon deserved a trophy for his performance in this dunk contest.

Zach LaVine edges Aaron Gordon in epic, insane Dunk Contest

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TORONTO — That. Was. Amazing.

In a dunk contest that will go down with the all-time greats — Jordan vs. Dominique, Dr. J from the free throw line — Minnesota’s Zach LaVine defended his dunk contest title. Barely. Because Orlando’s Aaron Gordon was doing dunks nobody had ever seen before.

And LaVine was bringing it just as hard.

The two men advanced to the finals — dismissing Will Barton and Andre Drummond, each of whom had good dunks — and that was when it got wild.

There were four second-round dunks, and four perfect scores of 50. (That was in spite of Shaq, who wanted to give nines for second attempts.)

“I was prepared for four (second round dunks),” LaVine said. “To tell the truth, he came with something that no one else has done. He did two dunks that were just crazy with the mascots, jumping over them. We just kept pushing each other until the last dunk. I’ve got to give it up to my boy Will “The Thrill” Barton. It’s because of him I think I won. Because he said try to go from the free-throw line. I’d never done that before, and I just tried it. So I guess it was a great dunk. I think it was the best one ever.”

The Air Canada Centre crowd was exploding with every dunk. The two men went to a dunk-off — and got two more 50s.

“If I knew it was going to be like that, I would have prepared better and we would have been here dunking all night, going back 50 after 50 after 50 after 50,” Gordon said. “We would have been here all night. I didn’t know it was going to be like that. I was just hoping Zach was going to miss, and it wasn’t going to happen. You could see as my facial expressions when Zach dunks it, it’s like okay, that’s a 50. Like I know we’re going to have to dunk again.”

So they went to a second-round of overtime, where LaVine put up another 50 and won the contest.

Gordon was close to perfect.

Zach LaVine can flat-out fly.

Magic’s Aaron Gordon with the over-the-mascot mad dunk

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TORONTO — Aaron Gordon was giving Zach LaVine all he could handle in the Dunk Contest.

He blew the lid off the Air Canada Centre with this dunk in the first round — and it wasn’t even his best dunk of the night. Never seen this before.

This dunk contest was awesome, so much more video to come.

Zach LaVine opens Slam Dunk Contest title defense with spectacular behind-the-back slam (VIDEO)

during the BBVA Compass Rising Stars Challenge 2016 at Air Canada Centre on February 12, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.
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TORONTO — Zach LaVine clearly heard all the talk that Aaron Gordon or Will Barton had a chance to upset him in the Slam Dunk Contest. He came out ready to prove his superiority right off the bat. This behind-the-back slam was his first attempt of the night:

Even better was the reaction, both from Andre Drummond and from LaVine’s Minnesota teammates: