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How a hard salary cap could hurt team play in the NBA


We know what a lot of you think — the NBA is filled with a bunch of ball-hogs playing isolation hoops every time down. There is no team play.

Wrong. Certainly not true of your NBA champion Dallas Mavericks, where teamwork make the whole greater than the sum of its parts. Or there is Phil Jackson, who has more than two handfuls of rings as a coach because he got players to buy into and follow his system (which involved a lot of passing and off-the-ball movement). Basically, if you think the NBA is all isolation, you are still stuck in the 1990s listening to Right Said Fred.

But a hard salary cap in the style that NBA owners want could change that.

Right now the owners are demanding a hard cap in addition to a larger part of the overall pie, which is why labor negotiations have stalled out. Owners — or at least some of the owners, it’s pretty clear there are divisions — want a system that looks a lot more like the NFL. There would be a hard salary cap and your biggest stars (Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Kevin Durant) would get a large chunk of that along with guaranteed deals.

But the average or bottom rung players would have non-guaranteed deals. They could be cut on a whim, for play or for salary reasons. Much how NFL rosters work. The owners like that because they could get out of bad contracts faster and rebuild more quickly.

But this is the NBA — you get paid for scoring. Veteran center Jermaine O’Neal, talking with J.A. Adande of ESPN, said putting guys on non-guaranteed deals would lead to guys looking out for themselves and not the team on the court.

“So do we accept a deal that totally butchers our game? Because what they don’t understand, if you take out mid-tier deals and say, ‘Fend for bare minimum at the bottom,’ they’ll be individualizing our game so severely.”

That’s something I hadn’t thought about. Take away guarantees, turn most rosters into extremes of max guys and minimum guys, and you’ve got a squad full of guys trying to get their numbers to get paid. I saw that dynamic in play with the Clippers before, when Donald Sterling didn’t extend the contracts of any of his free-agents-to-be and it was every man for himself.

In baseball, a guy wanting to get paid is going to try and get more hits and field more balls, which helps the team. In football, a running back will bust it on every play to get his future payday and linebackers will be trying to get more tackles. All that is usually good for team play. But in the NBA, if everyone is out to score team play is crushed. And the team loses a lot more games.

It’s called unintended consequences — actions taken can have reactions nobody expects. A hard cap could have an impact on the NBA in a way a lot of owners looking at their bottom line don’t see.

And we’d all suffer for that. As if the lockout wasn’t enough.

Kings pick up option on G Ben McLemore

Ben McLemore, Rodney Hood
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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) The Sacramento have picked up the 2016-17 option on guard Ben McLemore‘s contract.

General manager Vlade Divac announced the move Saturday.

McLemore was Sacramento’s first-round pick in 2013. He averaged 12.1 points, 2.9 rebounds and 1.7 assists last season.

Paul George reiterates “I don’t know if I’m cut out for a four spot”

Paul George

In the Pacers first exhibition game of the season Saturday against the Pelicans, Paul George started at the power forward spot and looked healthy — that should be the big takeaway. He also showed off his offensive game in the first quarter, eventually finishing the night with 18 points on 7-of-15 shooting. He forced some shots in the second half and had some defensive challenges, but it was a solid outing for a first preseason game.

George did not see it that way, and that will end up being the big takeaway.

He complained about playing power forward during training camp and given the chance after this one game he did it again, as reported by Candace Buckner of the Indy Star.

“I don’t know if I’m cut out for a four spot,” George said after the Pacers’ 110-105 loss to the New Orleans Pelicans, a game in which he started matched up against 6-foot-11 All-Star Anthony Davis.

“I don’t know if this is my position. We’ll sit and watch tape and I’m sure I’ll talk with coach (Frank Vogel). I’ll talk with Larry (Bird) as well to get both their inputs on how the first game went but…I’m still not comfortable with it regardless of the situation. It’s still something I have to adjust to or maybe not. Or maybe it’s something we can go away from.”

George sees himself as a wing, where he has played his entire career. He doesn’t like defending traditional fours, as a scorer he doesn’t like expending all that energy defending pick-and-rolls and banging with bigger bodies. He’s been clear about that.

He still needs to be open to the idea. How much time George gets at the four on any given night should depend on the matchup — and Anthony Davis is about as rough a matchup as he is going to see. Davis scored 18 points in 15 minutes, and the Pelicans controlled the paint against the small-ball Pacers. George had a hard time defending Davis — welcome to a rather large club, PG. That said, George scored 12 points in the first quarter mostly with Davis on him, he pulled the big out in space and got what he wanted.

Back to the matchups point, George will struggle defensively against the best fours in the game (most of whom are in the West). But what about the nights in the East when George would be matched up on Thaddeus Young from Brooklyn, Jared Sullinger (or David Lee, or whoever) from Boston, or Aaron Gordon with the Magic, or Carmelo Anthony with the Knicks when they play small? There are a lot of lineups the Pacers will see where George at the four makes sense.

The Pacers are transitioning from a plodding and defensive-minded squad to a more up-tempo style, and that’s going to take time— a lot more than one preseason game. However, if George is throwing cold water on the plan after this one effort, it might take a lot longer and be a lot bumpier to make that transition than we pictured.