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Mayor Kevin Johnson releases arena funding report, will the Maloofs and NBA bite?

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The plight of Kings fans, who came within an inch of losing their only major professional sports team, may be coming to a crossroads today, when the Think Big Sacramento coalition led by mayor Kevin Johnson releases their arena funding proposal to the public. All they have to do is come up with a plan to raise $387 million that keeps everyone happy. No biggie.

Sacramento Bee columnist Marcos Breton got the scoop on it, and released his report in the early morning hours on Thursday:

What is the guiding principle of Sacramento’s new plan?

That’s right: A virtual split – this time in thirds – among the private interests of an arena, the public and the arena’s patrons….

What you will see in today’s arena presentation are plans for three different funding pots to generate the $387 million or more needed to get an arena built. According to people familiar with the document, the Kings, the NBA and a private developer would contribute $91 million to $156 million in lease payments, upfront money, land and other revenue to pay for an arena.

The city of Sacramento would contribute the sale of public land, a tax on hotels and taxis, and money from items such as digital advertising and parking valued at $94 million to $123 million.

And, while residents in the six-county Sacramento region will not be asked to raise their taxes to subsidize a new arena, patrons of the venue will help pay for it. The third pot of money will be fueled by ticket surcharges, naming rights and other revenue sources that could generate $90 million to $121 million.

Kings fans and those tracking how and why the NBA operates the way it does will want to watch how the parties react to this report. Much of the Think Big Sacramento campaign has been orchestrated to a presidential degree, leaving no doubt to the positions of the heavy hitters involved – including companies such as AEG, the ICON-David Taylor group, and of course, the NBA and the Maloofs.

The Maloofs appear to be impotent in this discussion, as some league insiders have openly acknowledged that their future in the NBA will be determined by their ability to get an arena deal done.

The bottom line with this report is that the Kings and the NBA have been asked to foot a third of the cost. Whether that amount will be amicable to them given the whirlwind of interests controlling the matter is entirely debatable. On one hand, NBA owners do not want to see the league telling them what to do, and on the other hand, the Lakers, Knicks, and Bulls of the league don’t want to hear that (allegedly) broke owners can move into their backyard.

And, separately, while arena subsidy opponents scream blood murder, the reality is that top-flight cities have no leverage. They can clamor for leagues and owners to pay their own bills, but the folks in Sacramento would have to do that with an Anaheim Royals press release wiping their tears.

As for the Maloofs being able to contribute rental payments and/or in general, they recently liquidated their majority interest in the Palms Casino down to 2 percent with the option to buy back another 18 percent, in a financial transaction that could easily pave the way for another (Ron Burkle) speculator to come in and take over their team if they get elbowed out. They continue to assert their leverage, albeit with more discretion than they have used in the past, but in reality, David Stern knows where the bodies are buried. And as SB Nation’s Tom Ziller points out, the NBA has been working diligently to get an arena deal done – so they’re not going to stand for grandstanding when diplomacy is needed.

My take – we’re looking at a firm but fair offer from the City of Sacramento. They’re strapped just like most American cities, and this is their first offer. If this dance plays out like every other negotiation we’ve been witness to in our lives, expect the Maloofs and/or the NBA to say that the city’s request is ‘over the top,’ and they’ll waltz to equilibrium.

Kevin Durant introduced as ‘OKC’s own’ (video)

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Kevin Durant attended the Three-Point Shootout, which was a perfect time to introduce the high-profile Warriors star.

It just happened in an incredibly awkward way.

Report: Former Magic teammates had ‘real issues’ with Serge Ibaka

Orlando Magic forward Serge Ibaka, of Congo, reacts after being called for a foul while defending a shot by Denver Nuggets forward Nikola Jokic in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Denver. The Nuggets won 125-112. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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In trading Serge Ibaka to the Raptors, the Magic didn’t just get assets (Terrence Ross and a first-round pick) for a player who seemed increasingly likely to leave in unrestricted free agency this summer.

Orlando apparently also got rid of a headache.

Steve Kyler of Basketball Insiders:

Going from the winning Thunder to the lowly Magic probably didn’t bring out the best in Ibaka, and thats understandable, though not entirely excusable.

I also wonder how much of this was situational rather than anything Ibaka actively did wrong.

His presence forced Aaron Gordon and Jeff Green from their ideal position of power forward to small forward. That narrowed Mario Hezonja‘s path the the court. Any minutes Ibaka received at center cut into Bismack Biyombo‘s and Nikola Vucevic‘s playing time.

Both elements probably worked in concert. Ibaka disrupted the play of several teammates just by being there, which likely led to them giving him less benefit of the doubt about his attitude.

Don’t absolve Magic general manager Rob Hennigan, though. He built a roster overloaded with bigs. He asked for leadership from a newcomer who was third banana at best on his previous team and is entering a contract year. It’s not a huge shock this dynamic soured on and off the court.

 

 

 

Jarrius Robertson hits layup at Celebrity Game, hangs with Draymond Green (VIDEO)

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It’s likely you’ve seen Jarrius “J.J” Robertson before. The 14-year-old came into public view as a New Orleans Saints superfan that deals with a liver disease called biliary atresia. Robertson has shown up at NBA All-Star Weekend this year, and he’s been a big hit.

On Friday, J.J. showed up and played a spot in the 2017 NBA Celebrity Game. He even dropped a layup during gameplay.

Via Twitter:

But he’s not just been around the court. Robertson has been just about everywhere thus far, hanging out with NBA athletes, meeting Charles Barkley, and telling Russell Westbrook that the Oklahoma City Thunder need more shooters.

J.J. even hung with Draymond Green courtside, where the Golden State Warriors forward tried to trade his watch for J.J.’s chain.

Should have made the trade dude! But I’m glad he’s got run of the place.

Glenn Robinson III does his best to salvage Dunk Contest, gets victory in process

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NEW ORLEANS — This year’s NBA All-Star Dunk Contest was doomed to disappoint, it was never going to match last year’s epic battle. It started in a hole.

It never climbed out. Don’t take my word for it, check out what JaVale McGee thought.

Saturday was an underwhelming night of dunks punctuated by a couple of moments of brilliance.

The Pacers’ Glenn Robinson III had the most of those moments — which is why he won the event. His strong night started with his first dunk, which may well have been the best of the contest.

“And just talking to a couple people helping me, Vince Carter did one of his best dunks first, and it kind of intimidated people,” Robinson said sitting next to his trophy later. “That’s what I wanted to go out and do. I wanted to do one of my best dunks first. Who knows if it worked? But they missed some of their dunks, and it gave me a little more room.”

The final one from Robinson, the one that sealed the victory, may be the other best dunk of the competition — dunking over Paul George, the Pacers mascot, and a Pacers dancer.

“I originally planned for it just to be PG (Paul George),” Robinson said afterward. “I knew I had to bring out something special. We added the mascot and the cheerleader. I really just wanted to get up high and dunk that thing hard, man. My adrenaline was going. It felt like I was looking at the rim. All I knew was the crowd go crazy. I pointed like this because, man, everybody seemed to sleep on me, didn’t really think I was going to win this thing.”

Event favorite Aaron Gordon, who should have won a year ago, opened the contest with an innovative idea — a drone dunk — but he couldn’t execute it and there were a few attempts before he nailed it.

Gordon didn’t advance out of the first round, and his first dunk summed up the 2017 Dunk Contest — interesting ideas that didn’t quite pan out like planned. Gordon said some recent injuries didn’t impact his performance, and that if he had reached the Finals he had another drone dunk planned.

If it wasn’t going to be Gordon, a lot of people expected it to be the bouncy Suns forward Derrick Jones Jr. who won, and he reached the Finals in part thanks to this spectacular dunk that woke up the Smoothie King Center up.

DeAndre Jordan was okay, but without Chris Paul throwing him lobs it didn’t quite feel the same. Jordan can dunk with such power in game, but we didn’t see that Saturday.

In the end, it was Robinson who made the plays.

“I’m not really a known dunker,” Robinson said. “I practiced. I prepared. I know I’m a jumper. And like I said, I’m a guy that stays out of the way. But when it’s time to shine, that’s my thing. That’s what I wanted to do. I knew all along I had some things planned, and I just wanted to show the world.”