Milwaukee Bucks v Atlanta Hawks, Game 7

Brandon Jennings reflects on his the beginnings of his basketball career, AAU life, and repping Compton

2 Comments

If there’s any kind of underlying theme for the current lockout, it’s NBA players of all ilks returning “home.” For some, it’s less literal; plenty of young NBA players have returned to the college campuses they once called their own in an effort to complete their degrees and, in some cases, compete against the players suiting up for their alma mater. For those playing in the Goodman League and the Drew League, it could be a return back to the league that fostered their basketball beginnings, a way to give back to the basketball system that raised them as players.

Then, at ESPN Los Angeles, the Kamenetzky brothers have been rattling of installments of a tremendous series entitled “The L.A. in my Game,” connecting with NBAers from the L.A. area to fully understand how the city itself functions in the scope of player identity. Up this week is an interview with Brandon Jennings, and though he has plenty of interesting responses — ranging from him rattling off a list of future NBA stars that his team bested in AAU ball to dubbing Baron Davis the “Godfather of Los Angeles basketball,” — one in particular stood out to me:

Andy Kamenetzky: What does it mean to you to be a player from L.A. and part of that lineage of players people think about from this city?

Brandon Jennings: Well, first of all, a lot of people say “L.A.,” but I claim “Compton.” I claim the city of Compton hard, because there’s not a lot of players that came out of Compton. A lot of players didn’t really come out of Compton that made it. When people say “L.A.,” I say, “Oh, I’m from Compton.” Being from the city of Compton and growing up in a rough community, it means a lot to me to be able to make it out of there. A lot of players came through there. Tayshaun Prince came through there. DeMar DeRozan. Tyson Chandler went to Dominguez for four years. I went to Dominguez and I grew up out of there, so for me, that’s really big. To this day, there’s nothing like it, to be able to come out of Compton and make it to the NBA.

Next year, hopefully, when the lockout ends and we can get things rolling, I really wanna dig back into the community of Compton and also Gardena. Because those are the places where I grew up and where I hung out. That’s all I really know. So hopefully, next year, we can start a league in Compton or Gardena and we can do our own little thing.

The distinction there is important, if only as a way to best understand Jennings; it’s important to him that people know that he’s not just another L.A. product. No one exactly needs to put Compton on the map, but Jennings wants to represent the are and, better yet, to serve it. He doesn’t aspire to be another list on the sheet of players with “L.A. in their game,” but a genuine trail blazer for the basketball players in Compton who made it out but is never afraid to look back. That’s as close as you’ll get to fitting Jennings in a nutshell.

Report: Nike doesn’t plan to make sleeved NBA jerseys

LeBron James
AP Photo/Tony Dejak
1 Comment

Sleeved NBA jerseys sell poorly. Players dislike them.

So, the NBA switching from adidas to Nike is apparently an excuse to ditch the sleeves.

Sara Germano of The Wall Street Journal, via Paul Lukas of Uni Watch:

Nike, meanwhile, is expected to present its initial NBA jersey designs to retailers beginning this week. The company said it doesn’t plan to produce sleeved jerseys, a style debuted by Adidas in 2013 that received mixed reviews from players and fans.

Whether or not sleeves were introduced for ad space, uniform advertisements are still coming. The ads can fit on standard jerseys, no problem.

At this point, there’s just little to no upside for sleeved jerseys.

Nostalgia will treat sleeves better than present-day evaluations, but until we look back wistfully on this mostly failed experiment, good riddance.

Report: Carmelo Anthony twice asked to meet with Phil Jackson, who will get around to it soon

New York Knicks president Phil Jackson watches from the stands during the second half of the Knicks' NBA basketball game against the New Orleans Pelicans at Madison Square Garden in New York, Monday, Jan. 9, 2017.  The Pelicans won 110-96. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
AP Photo/Kathy Willens
5 Comments

Despite sounding like he wanted a conversation with Phil Jackson, Carmelo Anthony said he hadn’t spoken with the Knicks president since Phil Jackson mouthpiece Charley Rosen wrote Anthony no longer fit in New York.

It hasn’t been for a lack of effort.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

If you’re trying to keep up with the Jackson-Anthony feuds, their previous meeting came after Jackson publicly critiqued Anthony’s ball-hogging.

That affair should’ve provided a sense of Jackson’s communication skills. This latest episode only reinforces it.

The Knicks were in New York on Thursday, when Rosen’s article was published. They played in Toronto on Sunday and returned home for a game yesterday. That’s plenty of time for Jackson and Anthony to talk.

Why hasn’t it happened yet?

Isaiah Thomas on pace to break modern-era fourth-quarter scoring record

4 Comments

With seven and a half minutes left, Isaiah Thomas drained a 3-pointer, held up his left wrist and stared at it.

It was time.

His time.

Thomas scored 17 fourth-quarter points in the Celtics’ win over the Hornets yesterday.

“It doesn’t surprise me,” Thomas said. “It just surprises everybody else.”

It shouldn’t any longer.

Boston has won seven of eight, and in that span, Thomas has scored most of the Celtics’ fourth-quarter points. He has pushed his fourth-quarter scoring average to 10.1 for the season – putting him on track to break the modern-era record.

Kobe Bryant scored 9.5 fourth-quarter points per game in 2006, the most in the previous 20 years (as far back as NBA.com has data). The leaderboard:

image

Russell Westbrook is also on track to surpass Kobe and join this rarified air. LeBron James, Tracy McGrady, Kevin Durant and Dwyane Wade are the only other players to average even eight fourth-quarter points per game in a season over the previous 20 years. Not even Michael Jordan (7.1 in 1997, 7.3 in 1998) did it.

Boston’s offense has blasted into the stratosphere with Thomas on the court in the fourth quarter, scoring 122.1 points per 100 possessions. However, the Celtics allow even more with him on the floor in the final period (122.8 points per 100 possessions). The 5-foot-9 point guard has limits.

But where those limits exist when it comes to his clutch scoring – we haven’t found them yet.

Charley Rosen: I’m not Phil Jackson’s mouthpiece

New York Knicks president Phil Jackson speaks to reporters during a news conference in Greenburgh, N.Y., Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. Derek Fisher was fired as New York Knicks coach Monday, with his team having lost five straight and nine of 10 to fall well back in the Eastern Conference playoff race. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
AP Photo/Seth Wenig
6 Comments

Writer Charley Rosen describes himself as a “long-time friend and confidant” of Knicks president Phil Jackson. They coached and roomed together in the Continental Basketball Association decades ago. Since, they’ve collaborated on books and articles.

So, when Rosen wrote, “The only sure thing is that Carmelo Anthony has outlived his usefulness in New York,” Anthony took it as a shot from Jackson.

Frank Isola of the New York Daily News:

Rosen insists that unfair to him and Jackson.

Rosen at FanRag:

So, although I have often been called Phil’s mouthpiece by fans and some in the media, I have never consulted him about the content or general themes of any of the thousands of columns I’ve written for various sports web sites.

NEVER!

The only obvious exceptions being the interviews I conducted with him.

Although some of my opinions may be congruent with Phil’s, they are strictly my own. For better or for worse.

So, then, my views on Carmelo Anthony, for example, come from carefully watching and analyzing his play throughout his career.

I’m not in the business of parroting a party line, or of stroking players with whom I’ve had friendly contact.

As part of his Anthony critique, Rosen wrote, “It’s understood that he’d only accept being dealt to the Cavaliers or the Clippers.” Where did Rosen get that if not Jackson? Rosen invites questions by making statements like that without attribution.

Rosen’s history with Jackson also attracts scrutiny. So much of Rosen’s writing career has leaned on Jackson for exclusive access. He can’t have both that and the benefit of the doubt about his separation from Jackson. Even if Rosen wants to be objective, we all have biases. Rosen seems far too close to Jackson to evaluate him – and, by extension, the Knicks – properly. After all, when evaluating the team beyond Anthony, Rosen wrote:

PHIL JACKSON has pushed the right buttons