What does it mean for players to organize team workouts?

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From Sports Illustrated’s Chris Mannix:

Durant told SI he planned on getting Thunder players together, likely in either Florida or Texas, for informal workouts in September.

via Twitter / @ChrisMannixSI: Durant told SI he planned ….

That makes Durant the latest in a series of players including Zach Randolph, Andray Blatche organizing team workouts for their guys during the lockout. (Note: How often do you read those three guys in a sentence together on the same subject? “One of these things is not like the other” comes to mind.) But what, if anything, does this mean? Is there any relevance to organizing a team workout during the labor stoppage?

The answer: yes and no. Hold on, I’ll let you recover from that incredibly firm opinion I just laid on you.

Players getting together to hold practices can do a lot of good. First and foremost, it means less time for the players to remember how to play with one another and how to execute the plays once training camp actually starts. Anything to keep those things familiar will help, especially with the younger teams. The coaching won’t be adequate, of course, and specifically, the training could get complicated. For example, if you’re trying to figure out whether your team wants you to gain or lose weight, not being able to talk to your trainer creates a problem. A guy goes in for workouts, and adds five, ten pounds of muscle, only to find out, whoops, they wanted you to focus on losing weight. Furthermore, say Durant’s running point on a practice, and instructs the wrong things for some of the younger Thunder. That’s work that will have to get undone by Scott Brooks in the fall/winter/spring/oh my God it could be next fall. Now, it’s not likely that the Thunder will get into anything that serious. But little things are what coaches focus on a lot, and that has to be a slight concern.

The other biggest reason for these players to host these? It keeps them out of trouble. Look no further than Kendrick Perkins’ activities this weekend  for reasons to keep your guys busy running sprints instead of ordering bottle service. That closeness creates a sense of responsibility. One of the worst attitudes that’s prevalent in the NBA is that of a lack of responsibility to each other as teammates. This isn’t college, and these guys are professionals, on the lookout for their own careers. But look to the Dallas Mavericks for a great example of a team that held each other and themselves accountable to one another. That kind of attitude helped them to be honest with each other, to rely on each other, to play more closely together. The Mavericks weren’t a group of idealistic young guns, they were a slightly mercenary-like combination of veterans. But talking to any of them during their Finals run, they were extremely committed to one another. Keeping that chemistry with an offseason workout can help things.

And finally, maybe the best reason, it’ll keep players in a groove physically. Conditioning is a huge part of the NBA and keeping in shape can be a challenge without trainers to complain. Having an opportunity and a reason to really work hard, versus individual workouts which, as everyone can attest to, can often get derailed for anything from slight pains to just not feeling like it, helps players keep their edge.

Teams like the Celtics won’t organize these kinds of events until at least the fall. They’ve been around too long and want the rest. The Lakers are unlikely to, given how busy each of them are with being Lakers, plus Artest will apparently be in England. But if there’s one team that really needs to use its fairly considerable resources to work together?

It’s the Heat.

The Heat should be pulling every member on a long-term contract back to South Beach and should be holed up in a gym, working, improving. They should be bringing in semi-pros to work with, inviting Durant’s team down for a workout, trying to keep in shape and get better chemistry. It’s not going to happen, but the best thing LeBron James could do to keep out of the spotlight and try and get his career where it needs to go is to start working all the way through this lockout.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.