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NBA owners want parity not for you but for their pocketbooks

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When was the NBA at its peak of popularity? When one dynamic star — Michael Jordan — dominated the game and his team was a dynasty for the better part of a decade.

Based on that — and what we saw with Bird and Magic, and what we saw last year with the Heat — I see the idea of parity in the NBA as being to way to bring in more fans as flawed. The NBA is about selling its stars, but because that has worked.

The owners disagree. Strongly. The owners want their hard cap and parity with it. NBA owners point to the NFL where “competitive balance” is hailed as the reason for the sport’s success and massive television ratings. The league contends that if you don’t let the rich owners overspend and you put in a system where even the smallest markets can make money then the rising tide will float all boats.

Is competitive balance good for the NBA? Over at the Wages of Wins journal, Dave Berri destroys that idea (link via TrueHoop). They use a ratio that shows the NBA has been the least balanced of all American sports for decades, despite having a cap and limits on player salaires, and that has not slowed its growth.

David Stern and the NBA owners want to impose further limits on the spending of owners in the NBA. The NBA (in 1984) was the first to impose any kind of cap on team payroll. And in 1999 the NBA was the first league to cap the salaries of individual players. As one can see, the 1984 cap didn’t alter competitive balance. And since 1999, the average ratio in the NBA has been 2.7 (by far the highest in American sports). So the 1999 salary cap also didn’t seem to have much impact on balance.

This is not a surprising result. Martin Schmidt and I presented research this past summer that looked at the impact of various institutions (i.e. salary caps, luxury taxes, etc…) the NBA, NHL, NFL, and Major League Baseball have created to alter competitive balance. We found that none of these institutions had any statistically significant impact on balance in any of these leagues.

Berri notes that in the NBA market size does not help a team win — Utah and San Antonio have had great success in small markets in the last decade, the Knicks and Clippers floundered in large markets.

Berri also throws out there that the NBA was a much more balanced league before David Stern took over as commissioner, yet he has been heralded for the growth of popularity of basketball.

So why are the owners so driven on competitive balance? It’s about the money. It’s always about the money.

Henry Abbot does a great job looking at the issue of parity and television ratings over at TureHoop, using the English Premiere League and other sports. His conclusion is spot on about the issue of competitive balance in the NBA:

I must tell you, of course, that whenever, any economist is asked this question, they will say well, the league in question, and I’m not getting at the NBA here, it’s true of every league, including the European soccer governing body at the moment, every sports league when it proposes something to improve parity, says it is what the fans want.

But every such scheme also reduces the salary costs to the owners. It’s a way of containing costs.

Knicks allow John Wall to grab clutch rebound, score on break to ice game (VIDEO)

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The New York Knicks couldn’t get out of their own way on Thursday night, even with a historic performance from Carmelo Anthony. With the Washington Wizards in town, it was John Wall‘s finishing ability that pushed the Wiz over New York, 113-110.

The final 45 seconds were hectic, as Wall took the lead for Washington with just 32 seconds left after drawing a foul on Carmelo.

Down by 1, Anthony then missed a jumper with 18 seconds left and the Knicks allowed Wall to do this:

Wall would go on to steal the final possession from the Knicks, and the Wizards left MSG with a win.

Gregg Popovich gets ejected, standing O after screaming “You’re a terrible referee” (VIDEO)

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Gregg Popovich can be a fiesty dude, and sometimes he just wants to get his team pumped up. After news that Pau Gasol was going to be absent from the San Antonio Spurs’ lineup against the Denver Nuggets on Thursday, perhaps this was his way of doing that?

Late in the second quarter in Denver, Popovich was seen arguing with a baseline official as play continued on. Pop was hit with an initial tech, and as the officiating crew walked away he blasted ’em with the best dad insult I’ve heard in a long time.

“You’re a terrible referee!”

GOT ‘EM:

Meanwhile, Emmanuel Mudiay was more than happy to assist with the second technical and ejection portion of Popovich’s tirade.

Long Live Pop.

Watch Kristaps Porzingis come out of nowhere on this putback dunk (VIDEO)

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Kristaps Porzingis is “The Unicorn” perhaps in part because of his high basketball awareness on the offensive end of the floor. On Thursday night against the Washington Wizards, the New York Knicks big man had an incredible putback dunk that surprised even his teammates.

Thanks to a missed Courtney Lee 3-pointer, Porzingis was able to fly in from beyond the arc to slam home two points.

Via Twitter:

Yeah, that’s crazy.

There’s putback dunks and then there’s flying in from beyond the 3-point line like this one. Wild.

Spurs big man Pau Gasol fractures finger during warmups, out indefinitely

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The San Antonio Spurs will have to make do without PF/C for a while Pau Gasol thanks to a recent fracture in his left ring finger.

That’s according to a press release from the team, who said Gasol fractured his fourth metacarpal — the bone that connects the ring finger down to the carpal bones in the wrist area — during warmups before a game against the Denver Nuggets on Thursday night.

No word yet from the team on recovery time, but estimates given similar recent NBA player injuries suggest anywhere from 4-8 weeks.

Utah Jazz forward Gordon Hayward missed the first month of the season after fracturing his finger in early October. Cleveland Cavaliers PG Kyrie Irving missed around a month in 2012 with a similar injury.

Here’s hoping Gasol can make it back to the court quickly for the Spurs.