If NBA players decertify the union, might owners void all deals?

1 Comment

Why would a group of agents be pushing for the NBA players to decertify the union and sue the league on anti-trust grounds?

Because it’s seen as leverage — that anti-trust suit comes with triple damages, win big money and it becomes gigantic money. That threat, in theory, would push the owners to negotiate and give the union leverage.

But that move would come with risks — including the league wiping out every existing contract if the union decertifies. David Aldridge over at NBA.com has an interesting discussion of the decertification possibilities in a column Monday.

Keep one number in mind as powerful agents beat their chests about decertification: $4 billion. That’s the total amount of guaranteed contract money in the system that the NBA and its owners insist will go poof if the players decide to dissolve the National Basketball Players Association….

As far as the $4 billion goes, the league’s contention that the contracts would disappear is true only to a point. At some point, the league will reach a deal with the union, and would almost certainly have to reinstate the players’ contracts once the union recertified. The alternative would be either implementing work rules on the players without a deal, which would leave the league vulnerable to a potential players’ strike, or additional antitrust penalties if players sought redress while they continued to play under the imposed rules.

At any rate, the agents do not believe that the league would actually go ahead and void all of those contracts. Such a move could, at least theoretically, make every player in the league a free agent, able to go wherever they wanted. And owners like, say, Miami’s Micky Arison, might have a problem with that.

David Stern has called decertification “the nuclear option” and right now union executive director Billy Hunter is treating it that way. Federal courts are still slow and whether it’s just for leverage or not decertifying the union would reset the talks in a way. Games would be missed for sure.

Aldridge puts it well — right now the hawks among the owners that want major changes to the financial system are driving the bus on that side. But the players have hawks, too — agents and players willing to go to court. And nobody could feel confident of getting a win in the courts, that would be a drawn out and risky play for both sides.

Let us hope it doesn’t come to this. But the players are keeping union decertification on the table, and if they play that card it is going to get ugly. Or maybe we should say much uglier.

Harrison Barnes banks in game-winning, buzzer-beating 3-pointer (video)

Leave a comment

With the shot clock off in the fourth quarter and the game tied, Grizzlies big JaMychal Green put back Tyreke Evans‘ miss with a clutch flush. There’s a very fine line between ensuring the last shot and leaving time for an offensive rebound, and Memphis threated it almost perfectly.

Emphasis on “almost.”

The Grizzlies left the Mavericks 0.5 seconds, which Harrison Barnes used to bank in a 3-pointer – off a pinpoint bounce pass by Dennis Smith Jr. – to give Dallas a 95-94 win.

Heat snap Celtics’ 16-game winning streak

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky
Leave a comment

The Celtics didn’t have another comeback in them.

After overcoming a 13-point fourth-quarter deficit against the Mavericks on Monday to extend its winning streak to 16 games, Boston lost to the Heat tonight, 104-98. The streak ends as the NBA’s longest since the Hawks won 19 straight during the 2014-15 season.

The Celtics trailed Miami by 16 in the fourth quarter then cut the deficit to only one with three minutes left. But Dion Waiters hit back-to-back 3-pointers, helping the Heat pull away.

Goran Dragic (27 points) and Waiters (26 points) led Miami, which needed a reason to feel good after losing three of four to fall to 7-9.

The Celtics, on the other hand, still have a four-game cushion over the rest of the Eastern Conference. This might help them regain focus.

Serge Ibaka gets dunked on by Enes Kanter, hit in face by ball (video)

Leave a comment

Is Enes Kanter mad Serge Ibaka rifted with his family?

(No, not this family. That family.)

LeBron James blows wide-open dunk (video)

Leave a comment

J.R. Smith (slightly out of context): “We don’t start paying attention until after All-Star break.”