Dallas Mavericks Victory Parade

With lockout, NBA risks killing hard-won momentum


The owners and players are walking a fine line.

They both want a financial deal that is good for them not just next year but for the next five plus years — and this year’s Collective Bargaining Agreement will end up being the basis of the next deal, too. Both sides have a lot of money riding on the outcome. Both want to get a big slice of the revenue pie.

But if the lockout goes on too long — frankly, if it costs one regular season game — that pie will shrink. Dramatically

And that is the big risk. The NBA is on a hot streak. The last couple of NBA finals have been the most watched since Shaquille O’Neal was the biggest star in the sport and had teamed up with Phil Jackson and Kobe Bryant. Attendance is up, merchandise sales are up, interest in the league overall is up. Right now the league is approaching a level of popularity not seen since the Jordan era. It took a decade and a lot of hard work by players and franchises to win all those fans back.

A lockout fighting over how to divide up hundreds of millions of dollars as the country is trying to shake free of the worst recession in generations will kill that momentum. Dead.

After the last lockout it took four years or so for the league to really regain its footing. This time it will take longer.

On both sides — but particularly the owners’ end of the table — there are hard liners willing to do take that risk. They plan on owning the business for a decade or more, they want a new business model that makes the franchise they leveraged themselves to get profitable. Now. They will sacrifice a full season and lots of fan good will to get there.

And that’s a businessman thinking about his profits, his business, and not the good of others or the industry he is in as a whole. Which is how we got into the recession in the first place (thank you so much banks).

There will be serious repercussions to an extended lockout. Not the least of which is that all the momentum — built up because people wanted to see LeBron James fail or not — will be lost. The casual fan will be lost. For a long time.

Both the owners and the players talk about this, they give lip service to not alienating fans with a long lockout. The questions do the mean it? Really mean it? Are they willing to compromise to get it? Are they willing to sacrifice something they think they deserve for the good of the game as a whole?

I don’t know. We really won’t know until mid-September. But it would be sad to see the league throw away all the momentum it gained because rich people couldn’t decide how to divide up the fans money.

Dumped by Heat, Shabazz Napier hits game-winning 3-pointer against Miami (video)

Shabazz Napier, C.J. Watson
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After only one season, the Heat gave up on former first-rounder Shabazz Napier – sending him to the Magic in a salary dump.

Napier got some revenge by hitting the game-winning 3-pointer in Orlando’s 100-97 win over Miami.

It’s only the preseason, but Napier had to feel great about that shot.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.