Study shows Sacramento arena would bring billions to surrounding area


While the NBA stumbles all over itself trying to divide up a multi-billion dollar pie, the folks in Sacramento are making moves to put their own pie into the oven.

The Think Big Sacramento coalition, which is the ever-changing moniker of the grassroots political coalition to keep the Kings in town (formerly Here We Build), released a report on Thursday showing that a new Entertainment and Sports Complex (ESC) would bring the area $7 billion of economic activity and 3.1 million new visitors to the region over 30 years.

As sources close to the proceedings reported to us in late May, this report provides the backbone of financial proof necessary to convince Sacramento area voters that the ESC is a necessary and worthwhile venture.  And while a public vote is not expected, the public’s blessing on the matter is obviously a key to its success.

The coalition, which includes politicians, city leaders, and consultants not just from the city of Sacramento, but from the neighboring counties as well, also struck it big when the report found that those neighboring counties would receive $26 million in revenue annually, while the county of Sacramento would receive $131 million of its own.

This information comes at a time when growing regional support for building an ESC in the city of Sacramento has challenged residents in the outskirts of the region to see and understand how economic benefits go beyond the proposed downtown site.

It also follows a previous report from Capitol Public Finance Group estimating that 4,095 jobs would be created in the Sacramento region during the completion of the ESC, which has a 12.8% unemployment rate, with another 400 new jobs being provided on an ongoing basis.

While politicians have hesitated in the past to get behind public financing for sports arenas, the tenor of the discussion in Sacramento has changed significantly, as regional leaders face the impending loss of those revenues should the Kings leave for Anaheim.

“The return on investment the public would get from this is enormous,” said Executive Director of Think Big Sacramento to Dale Kasler of the Sacramento Bee.

Rob Fong, city councilman for the city of Sacramento added that the ESC would be “not only good for downtown, not only good for Sacramento, it’s good for the six-county region.”

Add into the equation the excitement generated by the drafting of Jimmer Fredette and the acquisition of promising power forward J.J. Hickson, things look about as good as they can for a city that wouldn’t resign itself to the fate of losing their team. Heck, if they can re-sign free agent center Samuel Dalembert or otherwise bring in a veteran big man, there could even be a playoff series to properly eulogize the old Arco Arena (currently known as Power Balance Pavilion).

And if things continue heading in the right direction within the Sacramento City Council and the Think Big Sacramento coalition, the tone of that sendoff will be much more celebratory than the one this past April.

That is, if there is basketball to play.

Dwyane Wade serious as mentor, teaching Justise Winslow post moves

Third day of Miami Heat camp 10/1/2015
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Dwyane Wade has earned his status as an elder statesman, the E.F. Hutton kind of veteran who speaks and everybody listens.

Rookie Justise Winslow is listening.

Winslow (who should have gone higher in this draft) is a perfect fit for the Heat and he’s going to be part of their rotation off the bench from the start of the season (along with Josh McRoberts and Amare Stoudemire). Wade has already fully stepped into the mentor role with Winslow working with him on post moves, reports Jason Lieser at the Palm Beach Post.

“As his career develops, hopefully he’s able to do multiple things on the floor, but right now there’s gonna be certain things (Erik Spoelstra) wants him to do, and some of those things I’m good at,” Wade said. “I’m just passing down knowledge to someone who I think could be good at things that I have strengths at. It’s gonna take a while, but if he figures it out at 21, he’s ahead of the curve. I figured it out at like 27.

“All of us are where we’re at because someone before us helped us. They helped by letting us sit there and watch film with them or having conversations with them. If he’s a student of it and he really wants to know, I’m a pretty decent teacher in certain areas.”

This is what you want out of a veteran leader and some of the young teams out there have done an excellent job adding this kind of mentor — Kevin Garnett in Minnesota may be the best example. Someone who can pass on his wisdom and show the team’s young players how to be a professional and win in the NBA.

It’s a little different for Winslow, he and the Heat are more in a win-now mode, but he should be able to contribute to that.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)

Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.