Dallas Mavericks Victory Parade

Players understand a lockout will kill league’s momentum


It’s the one question I’ve been asked by seemingly every radio show host, every friend in the last few weeks — how can the NBA go on a lockout now?

Television ratings are up — this was the most watched finals since Shaq and Kobe were teammates — and that reflects an increased interest around the nation. Whether it is young stars like Kevin Durant and Derrick Rose, the trio in Miami, the resurgent Knicks or the old guard Lakers and Celtics, people are excited about the NBA right now.

A lockout that costs games will kill that momentum. Stop it dead. It will look like rich and greedy owners and greedy players fighting over how to divide up your money. Because, it is.

And people on both sides of the negotiating table know that. The players get it, look what Luke Walton said to the Associated Press.

“The idea of the lockout and losing fans is probably the scariest thing of all,” the eight-year veteran said. “Even moreso than missing games or losing out on your salary for however long you lose those games, it’s losing the fan support because it’s at an all-time high right now.”

“The popularity is at the top,” he said. “It’s high, and the ratings were record-breaking the last few years, and from the fans’ perspective, the owners make a ton of money and are very wealthy, and the players make a ton of money and are very wealthy, so its kind of hard for them to sympathize with either side when these guys are hard-working people trying to make it and they’re spending their hard-earned money on tickets and merchandise and all that stuff.”

He wasn’t alone.

The Grizzlies’ Tony Allen also was taking part in the coaching program, and while he said a work stoppage would “put a needle in the balloon” of momentum, he sees a rather simple solution.

Financial restraint by management.

“If you’re a GM, you’ve got to be smarter with your money,” he said, echoing a thought career scoring leader Kareem Abdul-Jabbar voiced Friday. “If you don’t want to give a guy $197 million and you believe he’s only worth 60 percent of that, sign him for just 60 percent of it.”

There is real validity to that argument – the things the owners are asking for in a new CBA are in many ways to protect themselves from themselves. But right now the players get 57 percent of the money teams bring in by contract, and that is a healthy cut. There can be some giveback there, and on lengths of deals. There needs to be compromise on both sides.

The lockout in July will be bad publicity, but it is basically inevitable. What really matters is next October — if games are cancelled, if the season doesn’t start until December or January, the momentum bubble will burst. And it will take the league years to get it back

Khris Middleton dunks, Jimmy Butler can’t stop him (VIDEO)

Leave a comment

Khris Middleton has more expectations and more pressure on him after a breakout season in Milwaukee, followed by him getting him PAID this summer.

Well, he looked pretty good on this play against the Bulls, making the steal then throwing down despite Jimmy Butler‘s efforts to stop him.

Middleton finished with 10 points on 5-of-7 shooting for the Bucks. However, Butler had the last laugh as he went off for 23 points on 12 shots and led the Bulls to the (meaningless) preseason win.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

Leave a comment

Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.