Miami Heat v Dallas Mavericks - Game Three

NBA Playoffs: Miami gets home-court back with erratic performance


For a little while, it looked like the Miami Heat’s 88-86 win over the Dallas Mavericks to give them a 2-1 lead in the series was going to be a repeat of Dallas’ dramatic Game 2 comeback victory. The Heat came out in attack mode and put the Mavericks on their heels early, attacking the basket with impunity and getting out to early double-digit leads.

Still, Dallas refused to fold, and once again took Miami to the wire thanks to some superlative play from Dirk Nowitzki and some breakdowns by Miami. Miami only made one shot inside of five feet in the last 10 minutes of the game, and didn’t attempt a single free throw.

Meanwhile, Dallas clawed back into the game with some tough, rotating defense, some solid work on the boards, and a steady diet of free throws, as well as some great plays from Nowitzki. Nowitzki scored Dallas’ final 12 points, with many of them coming from the free-throw line after Miami committed needless loose-ball fouls on rebounds under Dallas’ basket when Miami just needed to make the clock into their friend and make Dallas work for every one of their points.

The Heat had a double-digit lead at multiple points during Game 3, and led by seven with six and a half minutes to go. With a minute and a half left, the game was tied. This time, however, the Heat held their ground. After Jason Terry missed an open corner three that could have potentially given the Mavericks a 2-1 series lead, Miami unleashed a Wade-James pick-and-roll that ended with James setting up Chris Bosh with a wide-open midrange jumper behind a Udonis Haslem back-pick. Bosh knocked it down, giving the Heat a two-point lead with 37 seconds left.

After a Nowitzki turnover, a missed “hero three” by James, and a Nowitzki miss on a jumper that was perfectly defended by Udonis Haslem, the game was over and the Heat had a 2-1 lead, taking home-court advantage right back from Dallas.

It wasn’t a perfect performance for the Heat, nor was it a commanding one. They let their offense get stagnant. They gave up leads instead of putting the Mavericks away early. They gave Nowitzki too many easy looks at easy jump-shots, and put the Mavericks on the line far too many times with needless fouls.

Still, it the performance the Heat needed to win, and the kind of performance we should be expecting from this team at this point. Despite the Heat being “Hollywood as Hell” off the court, they sure do love winning ugly on the court, and they did enough to win ugly on Sunday.

It wasn’t about Wade dominating, although he did have a masterpiece of a performance. The game came down to Mario Chalmers’ four threes, including a half-court buzzer-beater at the end of the first quarter that may have been a backcourt violation.

It was about Udonis Haslem stepping up to set a perfect screen on Dirk on the Heat’s final basket and play perfect defense on him on the game’s final possession. It was about Chris Bosh, who had played 11 consecutive quarters of sub-par basketball and had one working eye, making the biggest shot of his career. It was about LeBron James focusing on passing and playing defense late in the game instead of trying to go for the highlight reel and get it done offensively.

It wasn’t pretty, but by doing the little things right in the waning moments of Game 3, the Heat put themselves two games away from their ultimate goal: holding that championship trophy when the series is over.

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Dwyane Wade serious as mentor, teaching Justise Winslow post moves

Third day of Miami Heat camp 10/1/2015
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Dwyane Wade has earned his status as an elder statesman, the E.F. Hutton kind of veteran who speaks and everybody listens.

Rookie Justise Winslow is listening.

Winslow (who should have gone higher in this draft) is a perfect fit for the Heat and he’s going to be part of their rotation off the bench from the start of the season (along with Josh McRoberts and Amare Stoudemire). Wade has already fully stepped into the mentor role with Winslow working with him on post moves, reports Jason Lieser at the Palm Beach Post.

“As his career develops, hopefully he’s able to do multiple things on the floor, but right now there’s gonna be certain things (Erik Spoelstra) wants him to do, and some of those things I’m good at,” Wade said. “I’m just passing down knowledge to someone who I think could be good at things that I have strengths at. It’s gonna take a while, but if he figures it out at 21, he’s ahead of the curve. I figured it out at like 27.

“All of us are where we’re at because someone before us helped us. They helped by letting us sit there and watch film with them or having conversations with them. If he’s a student of it and he really wants to know, I’m a pretty decent teacher in certain areas.”

This is what you want out of a veteran leader and some of the young teams out there have done an excellent job adding this kind of mentor — Kevin Garnett in Minnesota may be the best example. Someone who can pass on his wisdom and show the team’s young players how to be a professional and win in the NBA.

It’s a little different for Winslow, he and the Heat are more in a win-now mode, but he should be able to contribute to that.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)

Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.