Miami’s biggest problem after Game 2? Dallas now believes.

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“Hang in. Hang around. Keep believing.”

Those were the messages that Rick Carlisle was preaching to his Mavericks in the timeout huddle, with his team facing a 15-point deficit with just over seven minutes remaining in Game 2 of the NBA Finals.

Apparently, Carlisle’s guys were listening.

Dallas put together a stunning comeback, closing the game on a 22-5 run that ended in a 95-93 victory, which evened the Finals at a game apiece. And the turnaround might not be limited to just this one game, either.

For a large portion of Game 2, it looked as though the Mavericks were simply overmatched. As Dirk Nowitzki struggled to find his shot, going just 6 of 15 from the field for 15 points through the game’s first three quarters, Dwyane Wade was having a monster of a game, and he and LeBron James were turning Mavericks’ mistakes into spectacular, momentum-seizing plays on the other end of the floor.

One of these plays, and the celebration that followed by Wade and James, might have been enough to spark the comeback. As the Heat were rolling in the fourth quarter and leading by 12, James found Mario Chalmers along the baseline, who kicked it to Wade in the corner. Wade drained the three, and honestly, it felt like a game-clinching dagger, even with so much time remaining.

Wade left his shooting hand up for several seconds, and as Dallas called timeout, James and Wade exchanged excited pleasantries on the sideline in front of the Dallas bench.

Since the Mavericks began their amazing comeback immediately after this occurred, it was only natural for a Dallas-based media member to play up this “celebration” in questions to players from both teams in the post-game press conference that was streamed live on NBA.com. Not surprisingly, Wade downplayed the reaction.

“A celebration is confetti, a celebration is champagne bottles,” Wade said. “That wasn’t a celebration. It had nothing to do with the outcome of the game.”

James was equally dismissive, and I couldn’t agree more with the Heat’s two superstars.

Wade had an absolutely ridiculous game. He finished with 36 points, was seen converting fantastic dunks in transition time and again, and this particular three-pointer seemed like, and really should have been, the nail in the coffin for Dallas. He and James felt it too, and their celebration was no more exaggerated than it would have been had it been done by players that people actually like from any other team in the league.

But because it’s the evil Miami Heat, and because Dallas was able to come back and get the win, now all of a sudden it was too much? Stop it.

That one play, and Miami’s reaction to it, wasn’t the reason Dallas found the motivation to come back. This is actually not a big deal for these Mavericks, who now have come back from double-digit deficits on the road in every postgame series this season. This is a veteran team that has proven it doesn’t give up, and doesn’t need to look long and hard at the other team’s “celebration” of a particular play to find its motivation.

What is valid, however, is the way that the Heat were beating Dallas up until that point. Miami has been deadly in transition all season long, and the Mavs kept turning the ball over, especially in the second half, leading to violent dunks from Wade or James that fired up the Heat and their home crowd.

That’s what affected Dallas, not any puffed-up sense of pride over a routine celebration of a big shot, at least by NBA standards. Jason Terry mentioned this specifically in his postage remarks.

“We looked at each guy in the huddle to a man,” Terry said, when asked what sparked the comeback with his team down 15 in the fourth. “Me specifically, I looked at Dirk, and said there’s no way we’re going out like this. There’s too much time left in this game, and for us to go out in a blowout-type fashion with them dunking on us, shooting threes on us, it would have really been disheartening.”

Instead, all the heart belonged to the Mavericks. As Dallas made big shot after big shot, Miami couldn’t get anything going in their halfcourt sets, after scoring easily and at will for most of the game off of their defense in transition. Once Dallas closed the gap late, the Heat could only launch long, contested three-pointers with the shot clock winding down on their last few possessions.

There are more details to the Mavericks’ comeback, of course, including Nowitzki’s fantastic game-winning left-handed layup after driving around Chris Bosh. But after spending the majority of Game 2 looking like they had no chance to win this series, Dallas changed everything before it was through.

Now, the Mavericks believe, and not only for one game as their coach had instructed them to do in that fateful timeout late in Game 2. The team believes it can win the whole thing. And that might be the biggest problem for the Heat as they head to Dallas for the next three games of this series.

Report: Clippers’ management remains committed to re-signing Blake Griffin

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Maybe Friday night in Utah, maybe not for a few weeks, but the Clippers season is going to end before they reach the conference finals, and with Blake Griffin sidelined by injury. It’s an all-too-familiar scene. It will be six seasons of the Chris Paul, DeAndre Jordan, Griffin experience in Los Angeles, and they will not have gotten out of the second round (unless you think they can come back on the Jazz from down 3-2, then beat the Warriors).

That has come with a lot of talk about the Clippers breaking up the core. Jordan remains under contract, Paul would be too hard to replace, and that leads to a lot of speculation — inside and outside the league — that Griffin could be on the move this summer, when he becomes a free agent.

That’s not what the Clippers want, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports in a video essay.

Management remains committed to signing him to a long-term deal this summer, league sources tell me.

Doc Rivers has said he wants to bring back this core. Multiple times. His argument is that this is a 50+ win team that is one of the better teams in the NBA, why would you take a big step back rather than look for the tweaks that get the team to a title?

Steve Ballmer has the checkbook deep enough to pay both Paul and Griffin max money (although keeping fellow free agent J.J. Redick as well would be difficult). The Clippers will have one of the highest payrolls in the NBA, and is this team worth that? Especially in a conference where the Mount Everest of Golden State is not going anywhere for a few years, not to mention the Spurs and Rockets will remain good, Utah is on the rise, and so are teams like the Wolves. The Clippers will be a good team that needs a lot of breaks to go their way to really contend — how much would Ballmer pay for that?

The Clippers need to do some soul searching this offseason.

Just don’t be shocked if the result of that is them running this team back again.

Playing through sore knee, Jimmy Butler says “I’m good,” will go in Game 6

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At this point in the season, everyone is banged up. It’s just a matter of degree.

But with Rajon Rondo listed as out for Game 6, the Bulls’ need a big game from Jimmy Butler if they are going to extend this series to a Game 7. And he is not near 100 percent.

In Game 4, Butler banged knees with a Celtic and it impacted him during Game 5, as Vincent Goodwill detailed at CSNChicago.com.

But he could only muster two shots and barely seemed to push off on his left foot—his lead foot, and it hampered what the Bulls could do late as he was their prime fourth-quarter performer.

He couldn’t even go straight up on a jumper over the diminutive Isaiah Thomas without pump-faking, throwing off his rhythm. He wouldn’t elaborate on the injury, although he said it happened during the second half of Game 4 on Sunday night when he collided with a Celtics player.

“I’m good. Everyone’s a little nicked up; I’ll be all right,” Butler said in the locker room.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune added this detail.

Boston has done a good job of limiting the number of times Isaiah Thomas is exposed on defense, having to cover Wade or Butler. Essentially, the Celtics switch in sort of a matchup zone to keep IT covering a shooter on the wing, even if his man goes up and sets the pick. Zone’s can be exposed (there’s a reason they’re more a change-of-pace rather than a basic set defense in the NBA), but it involves getting into the middle, getting into the paint. Which comes back to driving the ball and pushing off, things that Butler is struggling to do at his usual level.

There are a lot of other factors favoring Boston in Game 6, but if Chicago is going to force a Game 7 Sunday they need Butler to be an All-NBA level player.

Knicks’ Joakim Noah has expected shoulder surgery to repair rotator cuff

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NEW YORK (AP) — Knicks center Joakim Noah has had right shoulder surgery to repair his rotator cuff, a procedure that could sideline him until training camp.

The Knicks say Noah had the surgery Wednesday at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, performed by Dr. David Altchek.

The team didn’t give a timetable for Noah’s recovery, but coach Jeff Hornacek said late in the season that if Noah had the operation, the recovery time could be five months.

Noah had an injury-plagued season that ended early when he was suspended 20 games by the NBA for violating the league’s anti-drug policy. There are still 12 games remaining on the penalty that he will have to serve next season when healthy.

Noah had surgery on his other shoulder last season, limiting him to 29 games in his final season in Chicago before signing a four-year, $72 million deal with New York.

PBT Extra: Pacers offseason moves start with Paul George

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Larry Bird, when not delivering All-Star Game bids, should be spending his time lighting candles and praying in churches all over Indianapolis that Paul George makes an All-NBA team.

If PG13 makes the cut, Bird’s job this summer becomes more clear: Offer George the designated player max extension, get him to sign the deal, then get back to building a contender around him.

If George doesn’t make the cut, things get much tougher for Bird. I discuss all of it in this new PBT Extra.