Chicago Bulls v Miami Heat - Game Three

NBA Playoffs: Whole lotta Rose for Bulls, but they need more


Derrick Rose is going to try and make Tuesday night his signature game. He has said he plans to come out and be much more aggressive attacking the Heat’s double team.

It’s not that simple, and it will not be enough for the Bulls — they need more complete team effort on both ends of the floor if they want to even this series at 2-2.

Rose’s attacks will get most of the attention, so we’ll start there. The Heat double team that Rose talks about will not be that simple to break because it’s not a classic hard double. Well, it was for most of Game 1, the Heat trapped Rose off the high pick-and-roll, but he passed out of that and the Bulls knocked down their jumpers (and were 10-21 from three) and won the game.

In Game 2 the Heat started playing back, some, with more of a soft double. For example, Chris Bosh will slide along under the pick and cut off the driving lane and wait for Dwyane Wade or Mike Bibby to recover. Because of the length and athleticism of the Heat, passing lanes get taken away, driving lanes close up quickly. There will be no easy route for Rose to attack. But attack he will. When he does pass out of the double, the Bulls need to consider getting it back and resetting him quickly so he can attack more, maybe in some isolation plays.

The Bulls need to both knock down their threes and they need to finish better at the rim. The athleticism of the Heat players has caused the Bulls to miss too many layups and chip shots. That has to change. The Bulls simply need to start shooting better. They need to knock down shots to get better spacing.

The biggest thing for the Bulls will be on the other end of the floor — they have to do a better job shutting down the Heat. Miami seem to have adjusted to what the Bulls do, they have Chris Bosh making shots and LeBron as facilitator and they hit better than 50 percent of their shots the last three quarters of Game 3. And that is without Rose going off. As it has been all season, the Bulls win with defense first and so it must be in this series.

But this highlights Tom Thibodeau’s personnel dilemma. Carlos Boozer scored 26 points and grabbed 17 boards last game. But when Boozer is on the floor in this series the Heat score 111.7 points per 100 possessions, when he sits that falls to 88.9. A 22.8 points per 100 swing. But when Boozer plays the Bulls offense is 106.3 points per 100 possessions, when he sits it falls to 92.2. A 14.1 swing. So what does he do, play better defensive lineups that struggle to score, or score more and have defensive issues? The same issue repeats with Ronnie Brewer and Kyle Korver at the two.

The Bulls need to defend the best they have this series and someone — a superhuman Rose, a red-hot Luol Deng, but they will take anyone — has to pour in the points.

The Bulls know if they go down 3-1 to the Heat it’s all over but the Charles Barkley taunting. This is as close to most win as it gets. The Bulls will need the best of Rose, but they will need more, too.

Warriors embrace villainy in hilarious cartoon (video)

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Kevin Durant #35 and Stephen Curry #30 of the Golden State Warriors joke around while they pose for NBA team photographer Noah Graham during the Golden State Warriors Media Day at the Warriors Practice Facility on September 26, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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I find most of these corny, but “Super Team: A Warriors Musical” is fantastic.

Obviously, Draymond Green‘s character provides plenty of comedy. But the entire roster – from Stephen Curry to Kevin Durant to even Ian Clark – is used in the gags.

The breakout stars: Klay Thompson and Rocco.

Well done, Bleacher Report:

D-League implements three experimental rules

CLEVELAND, OH - MAY 24:  Referees review a play prior to ejecting Al Horford #15 of the Atlanta Hawks from the game for a flagrant foul in the second quarter against the Cleveland Cavaliers during Game Three of the Eastern Conference Finals of the 2015 NBA Playoffs at Quicken Loans Arena on May 24, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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None of these are as dramatic as the international goaltending rule, but the NBA continues to wisely use the D-League for rule experimentation.

The new rules for this year:

  • Each team will be entitled to a “Reset Timeout” in the final two minutes of the fourth quarter and final two minutes of any overtime period.  “Reset Timeouts” do not allow teams to huddle, but otherwise mirror standard timeouts, allowing teams to advance the ball (when applicable) and make unlimited substitutions.  If either team huddles or prevents the ball from immediately being put back into play, it will result in a delay of game being issued to the offending team.  The “Reset Timeout” replaces the “Advance Rule” which had been used in the NBA D-League the past two seasons.


  • The 24-second clock will reset to 14 seconds after an offensive rebound or when the offensive team otherwise is the first team to retain possession after the ball contacts the rim.


  • A 75-second limit on the duration of instant replay reviews has been implemented, except in circumstances where the review is for a hostile act or altercation, could lead to an ejection, there is a technical equipment problem or other atypical circumstances.

Hornets coach Steve Clifford pitched the “Reset Timeout.” I like it.

I’m pretty ambivalent on a 14-second reset after an offensive rebound. But why 14 seconds? If eight seconds are allotted to bring the ball up court, shouldn’t it reset to 16 seconds? It seems this is a continuation of a rule created when teams had 10 seconds to bring the ball upcourt.

I dislike the hard replay time limit. Replays should generally be faster, but if it occasionally requires more time to get the right call, so what? Those first 75 seconds are a sunk cost.

Rumor: Kentavious Caldwell-Pope demanding more than $20 million annually to sign contract extension with Pistons

ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 27:  Kentavious Caldwell-Pope #5 of the Detroit Pistons reacts after a basket against the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena on October 27, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.  NOTE TO USER User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading andor using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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Pistons owner Tom Gores said he’d pay the luxury tax if a contract extension for Kentavious Caldwell-Pope put Detroit over next season.

Yet, Caldwell-Pope hasn’t signed an extension with the deadline six days away.

What will it take?

Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

There was gossip over the summer that it would take a deal worth north of $20 million per year to get Caldwell-Pope’s signature.

That’s not an unreasonable demand. It’s up to Caldwell-Pope whether he’d accept less in exchange for more security, but I think he’d get even more as a restricted free agent next summer – maybe even a max contract, which projects to start at more than $24 million.

Caldwell-Pope is a good shooting guard in a league with a dearth of quality wings and a greater need for them as teams go smaller. He’ll be just 24 next offseason, so his next deal should last through his prime.

His preseason didn’t foreshadow a breakout year. He remains a good defender and streaky 3-point shooter. But it’s possible Caldwell-Pope steadies his outside stroke and/or becomes an even more impactful defender. He could also improve his off-the-dribble skills, though his bread is buttered as a 3-and-D player.

Still, it won’t take massive improvements for Caldwell-Pope to hold value. To some degree, the Pistons could view every dollar under the max on a Caldwell-Pope extension as savings.

If his demands remain high, the Pistons could always take another year to evaluate the fourth-year guard. With matching rights, they can always re-sign him in the offseason.

NBA sets record with 113 international players, a plurality from Canada, on opening-night rosters

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 21: Andrew Wiggins #22 of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Manu Ginobili #20 of the San Antonio Spurs go after a loose ball during the first quarter of the game on November 21, 2014 at Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Spurs defeated the Timberwolves 121-92. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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Until last season, the NBA set or tied its record for number of international players on opening-night rosters the previous three years.

But after peaking at 101 in 2014-15, the number dropped to 100 last season.

A sign the league has hit its foreign saturation point?

Probably not.

The NBA boasts a record 113 international players from a record 41 countries and territories to begin this season. Canada, with 11, leads the league for the third straight year.

A count of international players in the NBA on opening night:

  • 2016-17: 113
  • 2015-16: 100
  • 2014-15: 101
  • 2013-14: 92
  • 2012-13: 84

Here’s a full list of 2016-17 international players, but before you read it, take our quizzes on opening-night rosters.