Miami Heat v Chicago Bulls - Game Two

Rose denies saying PEDs a “huge” NBA problem


UPDATE 2:55 pm: Through a Bulls spokesman, Rose has denied saying that PEDs are a huge NBA issue. He said that the question was phrased differently, more along the lines of how big a problem would it be if the NBA were rampant with steroids.

Just having been around the league, this is not an issue that really comes up. That doesn’t mean it’s not an issue, and that some players aren’t using, but there is a lot of testing by the league and it just does not feel rampant.

We will update as the story develops.


1:15 pm: The conventional wisdom has been that performance enhancing drugs have not been an issue in the NBA — bulk strength is not considered as important as speed in the NBA, and there have only been a couple of guys who have tested positive for anything on the banned list (O.J. Mayo of the Memphis Grizzlies had a 10-game suspension at the start of this season).

But the league’s MVP Derrick Rose tells ESPN Magazine that performance enhancing drugs are a “huge” problem in the NBA and one the league needs to get more serious about. (via the IB Times of San Francisco and CBS Sports Eye On Basketball).

Rose was asked the following question by ESPN the Magazine, “If 1 equals ‘What are PEDs (Performance Enhancing Drugs)’? and 10 equals ‘Everybody’s Juicing’…How big of an issue is illegal enhancing in your sport?”

In response, Rose said, “Seven. It’s huge, and I think we need a level playing field, where nobody has that advantage over the next person.”

This comment flies in the face of what pretty much every league official, team official and virtually every player asked about the issue has said. David Stern before congress, LeBron James in interviews, union officials have all said that the NBA did not have a culture of PED usage and it was not an issue.

In a panel at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference a couple years ago, then Suns executive Steve Kerr talked about the great concerns teams have wanting to monitor everything that players take as supplements to keep them from taking something on the banned list.

But we all also know there are designer drugs out there that can escape detection. During the long grind of the NBA season, a drug that could help a player recover more quickly would be a huge advantage.

These comments will thrust the issue back into the spotlight, and it will not become another issue that is part of the ongoing (and already contentious Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations).

Report: Hawks signing Dennis Schroder to four-year, $70 million contract extension

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Dennis Schroder #17 of the Atlanta Hawks poses during media day on September 26, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
1 Comment

Update: Marc Stein of ESPN:

That’s an even better deal for the Hawks.


The Hawks traded a former All-Star in his prime (Jeff Teague). They waived two experienced backups (Jarrett Jack and Will Bynum), leaving only rookie Malcolm in Delaney in reserve.

Atlanta is putting all its point guard eggs in Dennis Schroder‘s basket – not just as the starter on a team that expects to make the playoffs, but a long-term building block.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Paying Schroder $17.5 million per year seems fair, because he could wind up drastically underpaid or drastically overpaid.

Schroder drives into the lane with abandon and usually produces quality outcomes as a result. He possesses impressive tools and is already beginning to utilize them, including in several clutch situations.

But he must make better decisions with the ball, finish better at the rim and shoot better from outside for Atlanta’s bet to pay off. It’s also help if he becomes more than just an occasionally pesky defender.

Just 23, time is on his side.

If Schroder develops into a quality starting point guard, he’ll be a bargain. The Hawks will have done well to lock him up before he proved his ability, and their other moves indicate they believe in him making this step.

But if a larger role just exposes Schroder’s flaws, this could backfire. For all the justifiable reasons to have faith in Schroder’s ascension, it’s important to remember he’s not there yet.

This is a relative high-variance bet by Atlanta, which I like in principle. Teams are generally too conservative with rookie-scale contract extensions.

If Schroder doesn’t break out as they hope, the Hawks will have problems regardless of whether or not they extend him. It’s not as if handling him restricted free agency would be a walk in the park.

Now, if Schroder lives up to the hype in Atlanta, the Hawks’ return on investment will be even greater.

Steven Adams spent NBA opening night watching Anime

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 28:  Steven Adams #12 of the Oklahoma City Thunder looks on during the first half against the Golden State Warriors in game six of the Western Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 28, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Leave a comment

Last night you were likely watching the Cavaliers destroy the Knicks, then flipping over to watch the Indians and Cubs. It was a great sports night (especially if you live in Cleveland).

That’s not what Steven Adams was doing, he was watching Anime. Which probably had a lot more drama than either of the NBA games last night. Via Fred Katz of the Norman Transcript.

You have to love Adams.

One Piece is… like I know. From Wikipedia:

One Piece follows the adventures of Monkey D. Luffy, a young man whose body gained the properties of rubber after unintentionally eating a Devil Fruit. With his diverse crew of pirates, named the Straw Hat Pirates, Luffy explores the Grand Line in search of the world’s ultimate treasure known as “One Piece” in order to become the next King of the Pirates.

Insert your own joke about that being better than watching the Knicks offense (or the Warriors’ defense) here.

Adams will be more focused on basketball Wednesday night when OKC opens the season in Philadelphia. Joel Embiid will keep his mind on the game.

Sixers CEO: Ben Simmons will play for Sixers this season

1 Comment

Ben Simmons is out with a broken foot — a Jones fracture — and that has led to rampant speculation about when the Sixers’ No. 1 pick might return to the court. Coach Brett Brown said January (the short end of the timeline) then walked those comments back, while there are rumors people in Simmons camp may want him to sit out the season.

Sixers CEO Scott O’Neill was on TCN’s Breakfast on Broad and made it clear Simmons will be back this season. He blew off the idea that Rich Paul (Simmons’ agent) wants him to take the season off.

“No, it’s not true,” O’Neil said. “Yeah, he’ll be back.”

There is no timeline for Simmons’ return, which isn’t just the team managing expectations (well, it’s partially the team trying to manage expectations). Jones fractures involve the bone that runs from the base of your little toe up to near the ankle, and the problem is that area of the foot does not have great natural blood flow, which means healing can be slow and harder to predict. We know that Simmons had surgery to repair the break, but recovery times will be flexible.

Brett Brown told me in a ProBasketballTalk Podcast how much he just wants to get Simmons, Joel Embiid, Jahlil Okafor, Dario Saric, and Nerlens Noel all healthy at the same time so he can start to see what lineups work, which guys play well off each other and which don’t (we learned last season Noel and Okafor are not a great fit). Maybe Simmons can be part of that process in the second half of the season.

Mavericks’ Devin Harris sprains big toe, out at least three weeks

DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 26:  Devin Harris #34 of the Dallas Mavericks poses for a portrait during the Dallas Mavericks Media Day held at American Airlines Center on September 26, 2016 in Dallas, Texas. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

Devin Harris is the kind of veteran, versatile player Dallas coach Rick Carlisle likes in his backcourt — he can run the point or be a small two-guard off the ball. Carlise wants multiple ball handlers on the court and Harris allows him to do that with a number of different combinations.

Or rather, Harris will allow Carlisle to do that once he gets healthy. From Earl K. Sneed of

Harris had surgery on the big toe on his other foot, this injury is to the “good” one. Harris can be a bit injury prone and the Mavs likely will bring him along slowly.

This likely means more J.J. Barea and Seth Curry in the short term in Dallas.