NBA Playoffs Bulls-Heat Game 1: Defending Derrick

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Let’s get this out of the way. Derrick Rose is going to average over 20 points per game in this series, and the only reason I’m putting that that low is because the trudging slow pace of the series due to the defense will limit how many opportunities he gets. Rose is not only a nearly unstoppable force of nature that seems to rise to the biggest of occasions, he’s also a high usage player that has the ball in his hands, all the time. The question is not how he’s going to score 25 or more, it’s how many shots he’s going to need to get there.

That said, you can’t just accept Rose’s trample, so you have to do something. The Heat have made it clear, they’re going to throw multiple looks at him. It won’t just be Chalmers, or Wade, or LeBron, it’s going to be a little bit of everything. The trick is to try and exhaust him in getting all those points and shots, just making it that much harder on him to wear down his efficiency and take away whatever you can.

The ideal scenario involves Mario Chalmers playing Rose up, with help coming at the elbow from a wing defender, and then a final weak-side rotation low from one of the bigs to challenge Rose at the rim and try force him deeper. That worked in the Heat’s best game against Rose, forcing 15 misses on 24 shots. In that game, Erick Dampier spent a lot of time on the floor challenging Rose. Dampier has seen no time in the playoffs with Joel Anthony, Zydrunas Ilgauskas, and Juwan Howard doing the lion’s share at center. Joel Anthony doesn’t have the raw girth or height to challenge in the same way, and Ilgauskas’ mobility is more limited than Dampier. Yes, I can hear your jokes now. It’s a matter of degrees.

The temptation is to check Rose with Wade or James, but doing so 1. exhausts your primary players on defense when you need them so badly on offense and 2. risks accumulation of fouls and 3. wastes them as help defenders. Both of those guys will see time on Rose, but honestly, Rose is too fast for either of them. Either can step in to attack the dribble or try and draw a charge, or if nothing else, force the dribble-back to reset the offense.

But there’s a bigger issue with bringing too much help. On so many of Rose’s floater misses when the defense does commit either at the wing or down low, it sets up both positioning and trajectory for the ball to land directly in a Bull’s hand on the offensive glass. It’s not just the first shot that hurts you, it’s all the second chance opportunities. That’s how a mediocre offense like the Bulls’ can survive when Derrick Rose isn’t producing.

The big key here is Rose’s jumper. If it starts falling, the Heat can’t go under the screen, which opens the edge to Rose. Rose is so fast, he turns that edge into a straight trajectory to the basket. Which means scores and fouls and points, or dump-offs. The other huge component is the Bulls’ outside shooters. The Heat’s wings will gamble off of Kyle Korver, and even moreso Keith Bogans and dare them to beat them. If they can’t hit, defending Rose becomes easier. Derrick Rose takes the Bulls’ offense on his back nightly. He has to get help to beat the Heat.

Report: LaMarcus Aldridge unhappy playing for Spurs

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The Spurs trading LaMarcus Aldridge – they’re reportedly shopping him – could open enough cap space to sign Chris Paul.

But that isn’t the only reason San Antonio is trying to move Aldridge.

Sam Amick of USA Today:

According to a person with knowledge of the Spurs forward’s situation, it’s the 31-year-old’s unhappiness in San Antonio that is the driving force behind the Spurs’ trade talks on Thursday. The five-time All-Star, according to the person, is hopeful that San Antonio can find a better fit for his talents.

Rumors about the Spurs trading Aldridge emerged early in the season, as he was reportedly unhappy about Kawhi Leonard getting the spotlight. When Aldridge signed with San Antonio, it seemed Leonard could do the heavy lifting as the team’s best player and Aldridge could get outsized credit as the leading scorer. But Leonard has emerged as the go-to offensive player, pushing Aldridge into a supporting role both in reality and reputation. Gregg Popovich calling out Aldridge publicly during the playoffs surely didn’t improve relations.

Aldridge turns 32 this summer and will likely become a free agent after next season. Wanting to leave the Spurs – held up as the NBA’s best culture – will raise additional red flags.

San Antonio might not get as much as it hopes in a trade for Aldridge. If Chris Paul is coming, the Spurs wouldn’t need as much for Aldridge. But they won’t know about Paul until July.

San Antonio also values building a roster of players who’ve, as Popovich puts it, “gotten over themselves.” If that’s not Aldridge, the Spurs might not want to keep him around.

There are numerous factors to weigh and incomplete information, but this is the twisting road San Antonio is navigating.

Here’s Knicks’ reported asking price from Celtics in Kristaps Porzingis trade

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Knicks president Phil Jackson’s asking price for Kristaps Porzingis is reportedly “massive.”

Just what does that mean?

Frank Isola of the New York Daily News:

According to a Knicks source, Jackson is asking for the third overall pick in Thursday’s draft as well as next year’s Brooklyn pick along with Jaylen Brown and Jae Crowder. This version of the deal would not include Boston taking on Joakim Noah‘s contract.

All the Knicks fans who threatened to relinquish their fandom if the team traded Porzingis – most would love this deal.

Would the Celtics? I doubt it.

The question is whether there’s a middle ground between what New York wants and what Boston would do. It’s possible Jackson won’t budge and is just shopping Porzingis on the off chance someone accepts outlandish requests like these and to teach Porzingis a lesson for skipping his exit meeting.

Report: First-round draft prospect says Phil Jackson fell asleep during his workout

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Like I said, there are better reasons to criticize Phil Jackson than him saying his priority was the Knicks and that he had discussed trading Kristaps Porzingis.

Jay Williams of ESPN:

A top-15 draft pick told me the other day, because we were involved in this out of this conversation about Phil Jackson and the Knicks, and he said, “Phil Jackson was falling in and out of sleep in my workout.”

Yes. “Falling in and out of sleep at my workout.” This is what this guy told me.

Especially given Jackson’s salary and reputation for not being a diligent worker, this story is too good to check out.

O.G. Anunoby invited to NBA draft, Harry Giles declines

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The NBA’s invitations to the draft are a good indicator of when players will get drafted. The league samples executives, who are more likely to be honest here than in leaks to the media, about how they rank players. So, the list is worth monitoring.

The players who will attend tonight’s draft nearly match the leaks – with one exception. O.G. Anunoby is going, and Harry Giles isn’t.

Here are the players who will be at the draft – a reasonable placeholder for the players most likely to get picked in the top 20 – via A. Sherrod Blakely of CSN New England:

Jonathan Givony of DraftExpress:

Harry Giles declined his invite sources told DraftExpress.

Did Giles decline his invite because, with his extensive injury history, he feared falling too far? Or did he just prefer to watch elsewhere?

Was Anunoby simply 21st on the NBA’s list of players to invite? Or was the league too unsure of his medical status to include him until getting a stronger grasp now?

I don’t know, but the possibility that Giles could slip or Anunoby is more secure alters my perception of their draft stock (Anunoby up, Giles down).