Lakers early exit could cost Los Angeles economy $70 million


I have a buddy who owns a pub in the greater Los Angeles area. How did a then bartender get the seed money to start his own place? He worked every Lakers playoff game during one of the 1980s Showtime runs, when the place would fill up, and he set that money aside. It went a long way.

The Lakers are big money in Los Angeles. They are the far and away the biggest sports brand in this city (and if the NFL ever bothers to return it will start at number two and have to earn its way up).

So the numbers in a Los Angeles Times story today don’t really shock me.

The Lakers are a huge draw for merchants and won’t be easy to replace, said economist Esmael Adibi of Chapman University, who estimated that local businesses would lose at least $60 million to $70 million because of the team’s early exit.

“When you take the crowd that would go to the Staples Center itself and all the activities that take place, it is a large sum of money,” he said. “Every sporting event has some economic impact, and unfortunately there is no substitution.”

AEG — a sports business giant that owns Staples Center and a share of the Lakers — is also the primary investor in L.A. Live, the retail entertainment complex next to Staples that includes a variety of bars and restaurants (as well as the West Coast ESPN headquarters). On Lakers game nights that place is buzzing, alive with people and energy before, during and after games. The Lakers loss hits them in the bottom line.

Over at Trader Vic’s in downtown’s L.A. Live on Tuesday — when the Lakers would have played Game 5 against the Dallas Mavericks at neighboring Staples Center — just nine people were seated in the lounge of the tropical-themed restaurant, and a party of 10 was finishing up in the back dining room. Typically, there’s at least a two-hour wait for a table on game nights, owner John Valencia said.

“As a fan, I’m extremely disappointed, but as an owner, it’s pretty devastating for business,” he said. “We’re event-driven, and when you have a Laker game on standby and it doesn’t happen, it’s very difficult to backfill.”

Dumped by Heat, Shabazz Napier hits game-winning 3-pointer against Miami (video)

Shabazz Napier, C.J. Watson
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After only one season, the Heat gave up on former first-rounder Shabazz Napier – sending him to the Magic in a salary dump.

Napier got some revenge by hitting the game-winning 3-pointer in Orlando’s 100-97 win over Miami.

It’s only the preseason, but Napier had to feel great about that shot.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.