Cleveland Cavaliers v Boston Celtics

Did Danny Ainge cost the Celtics this championship? No.


It’s an obvious and easy target. A changing point in the Celtics season.

Back at the start of February, the Celtics were 37-11, the top seed in the East, three games ahead of Miami, three-and-a-half ahead of the Chicago Bulls. They were title contenders. They had gotten Kendrick Perkins back in the lineup and Shaquille O’Neal had just stepped out with a little hip issue but he was going to be back in a week or so.

Then of Feb. 24, Celtics GM Danny Ainge shocked everyone by changing the Celtics core, trading center Kendrick Perkins to Oklahoma City (along with Nate Robinson) for reserve forward Jeff Green.

The Celtics finished the third seed in the East. They never got Shaq back (not in a meaningful way) and ended up bounced in the second round of the playoffs. It felt like they were never the same after the trade.

Did Danny Ainge do that? Did the Kendrick Perkins trade change the Celtics into also-rans? There are Celtics fans out there calling for Danny Ainge’s head over this move and what they perceive it costs the Celtics.

Those people are wrong. This isn’t on Ainge.

Kendrick Perkins would not have changed this series.

Perkins brings some defense to the table — he can defend traditional big men very well in the post (if you can step away from the basket, like Zach Randolph, it’s a different story). He’s also makes good help rotations and can clog the paint, slowing penetration.

He provides no offense inside — and that is what the Celtics missed most this series. They missed the Shaq from the first half of this season (who Ainge and Rivers and the Celtics doctors expected would be back). They needed a threat inside that balanced out the offense outside. They needed to punish the Heat for playing Joel Anthony. The Celtics offense hummed when Shaq was scoring (or was a threat to score) in the paint, Ray Allen and Paul Pierce were getting better looks. Rajon Rondo had more room to operate.

Perkins fixes none of that.

What’s more, the small lineup the Heat had success with would have forced Doc Rivers to bench Perkins for the key stretches of games anyway. The only way to offset that small lineup was a big man who could score in the paint to make them pay for it, and Perkins does not do that.

Maybe he makes some hard fouls on penetration, but that is not slowing the attack of Dwyane Wade or LeBron James. And both of them did serious damage with jump shots anyway.

Besides, when the trade went down we kept hearing about how Jeff Green was the kind of athletic wing player the Celtics really needed off the bench, especially after Marquis Daniels went down. (By the way, what you saw with Jeff Green this season is what you get, don’t expect a leap forward. Ask Thunder fans about it.)

I said at the time I didn’t like the Perkins trade, and you can wonder ho the team would be different with him, but it is not what cost the Celtics this series. This is not all on Ainge.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.