Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce reacts to a call by the officials in Boston

Celtics failure on final play symbolic of struggles

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For years, for much of this past regular season, this is where Boston thrived — they executed at the end of games.

At the time they needed it most — a final shot in the last 19.5 seconds of regulation that would even their series with Miami — it fell apart. In an ugly fashion. And it symbolized what has happened to the Celtics season.

“Lotta talking in the huddle, but there wasn’t enough listening, I believe,” Rajon Rondo told Jessica Camerato of CSN New England.

The play had Paul Pierce dribbling near the top of the three-point arc. Ray Allen was supposed to fade off quickly toward the three point line which would draw a defender and a lot of attention, then Kevin Garnett would set a high pick for Pierce (who had been the best Celtic on the floor that night). Then they would create off the pick-and-pop.

Except it never happened. Allen got the inbound pass and got it back to Pierce with 11 seconds to go. Allen drifted out to the right side of the arc, then slid back into the elbow where Garnett was. Bringing his defender with him. Allen looked like he wants to set a screen to free Garnett to get out to Pierce, but Garnett seems surprised by Allen’s arrival and there is a lot of confusion.

Garnett never makes it out to set the screen for Pierce, who with 5 seconds left has to make his move regardless. Pierce wants to go right in these situations but LeBron James defends him well and forces him left. Pierce gets to the elbow extended and goes for a contested fadeaway that misses.

Paul Pierce: “It was supposed to end up with a fade for Ray [Allen], then I was coming off a pick-and-roll for Kevin [Garnett]. I guess there was a little confusion right there and we never got into it, and I had to force a bad shot.”

But there had been confusion all night, part of the reason the Celtics had 16 turnovers. There were missed layups and just breakdowns of execution through the end of the game.

It wasn’t the Celtics we expected to see, but ones we have seen more of late in the season and into the playoffs. One play has come to symbolize why the Celtics will not be going back to the finals this season. When the pressure was on, they were not the team that executed better.

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five
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VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.