Anaheim may never get an NBA team thanks to Lakers

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Not to deflate the mood on what should be a day of celebration in Sacramento, but it is quite possible that a year from now Kings fans will lose their battle to keep the Kings in Sacramento.

If efforts to get a new arena built fall short — and if public money is required it likely will — then the other NBA owners are not going to stand in the way of the Maloof brothers moving their team.

But don’t bet on it being to Anaheim.

Lakers owner Jerry Buss led an drive to block that move, and while he got a big boost from Mayor Kevin Johnson’s effort in Sacramento, the organized opposition from him (and Clippers owner Donald Sterling) mattered. Ray Ratto at CSN Bay Area explains.

Seattle lost the SuperSonics because Clay Bennett didn’t have enough opposition to his plan to move to Oklahoma City, come hell or high water. Oh, there was Mark Cuban, but who listens to him? Certainly not his partners.

There was, however, plenty of resistance to the Maloof Brothers’ plan to find their bliss in Disneyland, and it began with Jerry Buss, who simply didn’t want the television audience for his LakerTV network to be splintered further by the addition of a third Southern California team….

But when Gavin Maloof was asked if there was any unhappiness with the Lakers’ role in foiling their escape plan, he didn’t answer for a good 10 seconds before saying he wanted to focus instead on Sacramento and its fans.

That opposition isn’t going away.

In fact, it runs deeper and into bigger pockets than just the already respected Buss family. If you want to go down the conspiracy rabbit hole with me, connect the dots in the next paragraph.

Sports business powerhouse AEG owns a minority share of the Los Angeles Lakers, as well as the Staples Center (and a bunch of other arenas around the world). They are someone David Stern wants to stay on the good side of and they are interested in the Lakers continuing to turn a nice profit. Coincidentally, AEG is tied to ICON Venue Group, which is planning the new building in Sacramento. Also AEG owns the brand new, NBA ready Sprint Center in Kansas City (designed by ICON), a market that does not have an NBA team in it.

Draw any lines there you want.

Anaheim comes with one big advantage — its own billionaire. Broadcom founder Henry Samueli has the money to lure a team to the Honda Center in Anaheim, which he runs. He has the money to make the changes to the building the NBA would demand. He has the money to give large loans to any potential teams moving in who may have debt problems.

If Sacramento can’t get its building together, Anaheim may again be the preferred choice by the Maloofs for a move. But don’t bet on that being the landing spot. The opposition to bringing a third team into the Southern California market is strong.

Report: Pistons monitoring Markieff Morris situation

Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris
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Markieff Morris made a lot of noise this summer about being unhappy in Phoenix and wanting out, after the Suns traded his twin brother Marcus to the Pistons as part of a salary dump. He openly demanded a trade, and said on the record several times that his long-term future is not with the team. He’s changed his tune since training camp started, once he realized he has no choice but to play for the Suns unless they decide to trade him. But according to the Detroit Free Press‘ Vincent Ellis, there is interest from the one team he would be guaranteed to want to play for:

Markieff’s unhappiness with the Suns started when they traded his brother, so he would obviously jump at the chance to reunite with Marcus. And they don’t have much in the way of power forward depth beyond the other Morris twin and Ersan Ilyasova, so it would be a good fit from a basketball standpoint. But with the brothers’ felony assault charges pending, reuniting them on the same roster might not be the best idea, and it also opens up the possibility of having to trade one of them in the future and the other one being unhappy. So far, the Suns have shown no inclination to trade Markieff, but if that changes, the Pistons are an interesting destination to keep an eye on.

Popovich to Aldridge: “Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit” out practice.

LaMarcus Aldridge
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Gregg Popovich’s habit of resting key players at times has become the norm around the league as more and more studies have shown it helps players perform at higher levels plus helps reduce injury risk. Still, Popovich is the poster child.

New Spur LaMarcus Aldridge wasn’t used to this but got introduced to it in a very Popovich way, reports Jeff McDonald at the Express-News.

LaMarcus Aldridge missed his first workout of training camp today with leg tightness. Or rather, the Spurs — being the Spurs — held him out for precautionary reasons.

“We sat him out,” coach Gregg Popovich said. “He didn’t want to do it. I said, ‘Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit.’”

He might as well have added “get used to this.” Aldridge is going to get some rest this season. Not as many as Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, and Tony Parker, but he’s going to get some nights off.

Remember, Aldridge is a guy who played through a torn ligament in his thumb last season because he thought the Blazers could make noise in the playoffs (and they might have had Wesley Matthews not gotten hurt). He’s not a guy used to being told to sit and rest.

It’s his “Welcome to the Spurs” moment.