Portland Trail Blazers v Los Angeles Lakers

Lamar Odom’s reality show not affecting his game


I’ll be up front: I don’t like to criticize other media members for their opinions. Sports should be a fun debate and if we disagree about things, so what. The vast majority of people I’ve met in this business are good people, serious and passionate, who realize we have some cool jobs.

And I like Bill Plaschke of the Los Angeles Times. The couple brief times we’ve spoken casually at events he has seemed a good guy, and I can tell you people in the media really like him.

But his column on Lamar Odom and his new reality show with both poorly thought out and crossed the line into a personal life that really was uncalled for.

In case you missed it (and I did for a day because frankly, I’ve stopped reading Plaschke regularly), he said Odom’s new reality show Khloe & Lamar was bad for Odom and the Lakers.

One of the show’s themes, even from the arrangement of names in the title, is that the Kardashian women are powerful enough to even push around an NBA star. I’m wondering how Odom can watch or hear about himself portrayed in this manner, then go out and easily become the aggressor on the basketball court….

It’s raw, it’s painful, it sometimes shows Odom as being even softer than the reputation of Pau Gasol and, as a motivational tool, it stinks.

The problem is that all actual evidence shoots this down. Plaschke may not like reality television, but he tries to pull out small sample examples to bolster his point when the larger picture shoots him down.

The Lakers went 17-1 while the reality show was being filmed and Lamar Odom kept playing well enough that he put a stranglehold on winning his first ever Sixth Man of the Year award, following the best season of his pro career.

Then the show went on the air and the Lakers didn’t play as well. The problem there is a basic causation vs. correlation problem — just because two things happen at the same time doesn’t mean one caused the other. There is a long history of the Lakers in the last three years going through stretches of playing poorly for weeks at a time. None of those were reality show related, they were Lakers psyche related.

If you’re trying to say a reality show made Lamar Odom an inconsistent player, then apparently he has been filming a reality show since college.

Did Odom have a bad first game of the playoffs? Yes. Name a Laker who didn’t. So Plaschke makes a connection to the reality show….

But then Odom put up 16 points in Game 2 and was one of the keys to the Lakers win. So… now what with that theory? Well, Pau Gasol had a second off game in a row, so maybe he is bothered by Odom’s reality show? Or maybe we should let the big picture play out before leaping to conclusions.

Before I wrote this, I suffered through one episode of Khloe & Lamar (and I mean suffered, that show is just bad television). My first thought is the thing seems scripted. Even the arguments seem scripted. So, just like on Around The Horn.

You know how Odom came off to me? Human. He has fights in his marriage and sometimes says things he regrets. Been there. He makes mistakes. He tries to get through as best he can. He is insecure about some things. He wants to make his wife happy. All totally different than the rest of us.

And his wife won an argument… um, yea. That’s how it works 99 percent of the time. Unless Plaschke married a mannequin he knows that.

Odom — and every NBA player — has to go through the same life crap we all do. Personal relationships can effect how we perform at work sometimes. Eve though we try not to let it. We make mistakes. We spend a lot of time dealing with the little annoyances of life when we’d rather be doing what we enjoy doing.

Odom decided to put all that out there in a reality television show. So what? There are limits to what we should read into the personal life of professional athletes, even when they put those lives out in the most public of displays.

Basically, until we see evidence that Khloe & Lamar makes Odom worse on the court, you can’t say it does. No matter how desperate for a column topic you are.

Warriors’ interim coach Luke Walton’s car stolen

Luke Walton
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If you’re looking for a “when are things going to go wrong for the Warriors” moment, we have one for you. But it may not be what you had hoped for.

Warriors’ interim head coach Luke Walton — the guy on the sidelines for the 15 (soon to be 16) game winning streak — had his car stolen during a crime spree, reports NBCBayArea.com.

One of the cars stolen during an Oakland Hills crime spree belongs to Golden State Warriors coach Luke Walton, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley said late Monday.

Walton’s Mercedes Benz was stolen Tuesday by two suspects, who police believe are also responsible for a violent attack on a 75-year-old woman outside her home on Thursday. The suspects also took the woman’s car during the attack, according to police.

Yikes. That’s serious.

I’m sure Steve Kerr has like 14 cars, he can loan one to Walton.

Pacers guard George Hill returns Tuesday against Wizards

Paul George, Marcus Morris
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Pacers guard George Hill returned to the lineup Tuesday night against Washington after missing three games with an upper respiratory infection.

Hill is averaging 14 points and just under 37 minutes in 10 games this season. He was on the bench in case of emergency in Saturday’s victory over Milwaukee.

Coach Frank Vogel said Tuesday Hill’s infection had improved “to the point where he’s fine to play,” but would keep an eye out for fatigue after an 11-day layoff.

Hassan Whiteside on intentional fouls: “It’s not working, so keep fouling me”

Hassan Whiteside

Remember how Adam Silver was preaching that the league didn’t want to change the intentional foul rule — the hack-a-Shaq strategy — because it was really about two players (DeAndre Jordan and Dwight Howard) and a handful of others now and then. The fact that it’s not basketball didn’t matter.

Well, it’s not just two — Miami’s Hassan Whiteside has gotten the treatment this season. He’s a 53.4 percent free throw shooter this season.

And he says bring it on. From Jason Lieser of the Palm Beach Post:

“I’m enjoying this,” he said. “Foul me so I can get a double-double and we can win. It’s not working, so keep fouling me.”

He’s even smart at not getting fouled.

Whiteside also is liking that teams are looking at their options against the best defense in the NBA — yes, Miami at 94 points allowed per 100 possessions, is the best defense in the NBA right now — and deciding to attack Whiteside.

“There’s teams that’s out there that say ‘Stay away from Hassan,’ and there’s teams that say, ‘We don’t care if Hassan’s down there. Attack Hassan.’ I love them teams that do that. God bless them coaches. I love them teams.”

Whiteside is not as great a defender as the block totals would indicate — if he doesn’t see a block in it, his rotations can be a bit slow. One scout recently called him a selfish defender to me recently, suggesting he is in it for the numbers, not the sacrifices needed for an elite defense. True or not, the Heat have an elite defense and Whiteside is at the heart of it.

And if the strategy is to try to exploit him, Whiteside plans to make people pay.

LeBron James: Spend less time comparing, more appreciating the greats

Michael Jordan, LeBron James

Monday night, LeBron James joined Oscar Robertson as the only two players in NBA history to be in the top 25 all-time in assists and scoring. Somewhere this summer (maybe late last season), Stephen Curry passed LeBron James and the best player walking the face of the earth. Don’t even get started on trying to compare LeBron or Kobe Bryant to Michael Jordan.

No, seriously, don’t. LeBron thinks we spend to much time comparing and not enough time appreciating the great players of sport, such as comparing him to Robertson (or Magic). Here is what LeBron said to Joe Varden of the Cleveland Plain Dealer:

“I think what we get caught up in, in our league too much is trying to compare greats to greats instead of just accepting and acknowledging and saying, ‘Wow, these are just great players,'” James said. “I think in the NFL when you talk about great quarterbacks, they don’t really compare great quarterbacks. They say, ‘Oh, Joe Montana is great.’ You know, ‘Tom Brady is great. Aaron Rodgers is great. Steve Young is great.’ (Terry) Bradshaw, all those great quarterbacks they never compare them as much, but when it comes to our sport we’re so eager to say, ‘Who is better, Oscar or (Michael) Jordan?’ or, ‘Jordan or LeBron or Kobe (Bryant) or these guys?’ instead of just accepting greatness.”

He’s right.

I admit I can get as sucked into this as the next person, it’s a fun barstool argument to have, but in the end it can suck the joy out of watching great players. This is not a new position for me, I was a Laker blogger back in the Kobe/Gasol era and tried to tell those fans to enjoy it while they could. Be a fan of the game has been my mantra.

No player has had to deal with this level of scrutiny like LeBron, the first NBA superstar of the social media age. LeBron is a lock Hall of Famer, he will go down as one of the greats to ever play the game, maybe the most physically gifted ever (him or Wilt), yet while he is still just 30 years old we try to rank him against MJ, Dr. J., Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, and a host of others. It’s been going on since he was 24. Probably earlier.

Can you imagine the online heat Jordan would have faced online when the Pistons rolled him and the Bulls in the playoffs three straight years, up to his age 26? But now in the mythology of Jordan those times are almost forgotten. They were dissected at the time, but not with the venom found on twitter. Not with the level of scrutiny LeBron faces.

Does Kobe suck this season? Maybe. But there are flashes of the great player and as fans we should try to savor those moments (even if we question now Byron Scott uses him). Same with Tim Duncan (who doesn’t suck). Or Kevin  Garnett. Plus there are all these great players on the rise like Anthony Davis and Karl-Anthony Towns and on and on, yet the NBA world is critical first.

We all need to savor these players, these moments more.

Even if we know LeBron is not MJ, it doesn’t mean LeBron isn’t special.