New York Knicks v Miami Heat

LeBron James’ evolving post game

2 Comments

When LeBron James came into the league, he was a one-of-a-kind physical specimen who could get to the rim and pass with the best of them. Shortly after he graced the cover of Sports Illustrated, people began to question James’ perimeter game, and his jump shot was widely criticized.

Over the course of eight seasons, LeBron what was a glaring weakness his rookie season and turned it into a strength. James now makes 44% of his long 2-point jump shots (16-23 feet) and 45.4% of his mid-range jump shots (10-15 feet), and both marks are well above the league average. James still isn’t a consistent three-point shooter, but very few players can make that shot off the dribble consistently, and teams still have to respect James from beyond the three-point arc. (That said, I think LeBron should make more of an effort to make catch-and-shoot threes an effective part of his game, but that’s a story for another time.)

Now that James is making his jump shots more regularly, his post game is what gets criticized. James is bigger and stronger than almost every small forward and shooting guard in the league, but he doesn’t look to score with his back to the basket as often as many people think he should. Many have said that LeBron’s lack of a post game is evidence that his game isn’t evolving, and that he doesn’t work as hard or as smart as the league’s other great players.

However, as Heat.com’s Cooper Moorehead pointed out today, LeBron does have a post game:

Despite James suffering from a relative lack of mythology [regarding his post game], partially due to the absence of a narrative-fitting signature move, the numbers encourage a theory. Before we get to video, we’ll begin with those numbers.

James, mechanical though he can appear, has 160 post-up possessions to his name this season, shooting 52.4 percent, drawing a shooting foul 8.8 percent of the time and scoring at least a single point on over half the plays. Better yet, he scores 1.03 points per post-up, which ranks him 19th in the league.

That’s among all NBA players, not just small forwards or wing players.

For comparison’s sake, Bryant, in an offense built around versatile players who can operate in the post, has 300 post-ups, but he is ranked 39th in the league scoring 0.97 points per possession, while getting to the free-throw line 1.5 percent less. Effectively, for every 100 possessions, James scores six more points than Bryant.

Among other swingmen known for their post-up capabilities, Carmelo Anthony is 51st with .94 PPP in 274 post-ups, Joe Johnson 26th in 202 possessions (1.00 PPP) and Paul Pierce 10th at 1.13 PPP in 120 post-ups.

That James’ post game is already pretty darn effective is a story in and of itself, but what might be more important is Moorehead’s revelation that LeBron is committed to further developing his post-up game:

James working on his post-game – along with Dwyane Wade – with assistant coach David Fizdale has been a common sight after practices ever since training camp. The length of time and the moves they are working on vary, but Fizdale is a fixture, the man who has worked with James since day one.

“I commend him for having the humility to say he needs to improve at it,” Fizdale said. “That’s a big thing for a guy that could have an ego that says, ‘No, I’m good at this already,’ but he has the humility to say, ‘No, I need to get better,’ and he puts in the time.”

Moorehead includes some video of the things that already work in the post for LeBron — he’s getting better at taking deep position and making a quick move to the rim, and he’s very tough to stop when he catches it in the post, faces up, and takes one power dribble towards the rim — and some talk about the more advance post moves LeBron is working on. James has been trying to get comfortable with an unblockable but very difficult running hook; after that — he’ll start working more on his drop-steps and counter-moves.

One thing about LeBron’s post game is that it will never look like Michael Jordan or Kobe Bryant’s, which is a comparison Moorehead touches on in his piece. Bryant’s best attributes at this stage of his career are his balance and shooting touch; LeBron’s best gifts are his size, speed, and strength. Graceful fadeaways and intricate counter-moves work wonderfully for Bryant, but LeBron’s best post-up possessions are going to be the ones where it doesn’t even look like he’s doing anything all that impressive — a deep seal under the basket that leads to an easy layup, a quick spin around a defender, or a possession where James simply bullies his way under the basket before going up for the score.

There can be beauty in simplicity — if James embraces that, keeps working on his basic footwork, and stays committed to trying to score on the blocks, he’s going to be even more unstoppable than he already is.

Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan’s bromance continues after beating Celtics (VIDEO)

Leave a comment

Toronto Raptors stars Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan are becoming one of the best duos in the NBA, on and off the court. They joked around in the locker room after their win over the Boston Celtics on Friday night, 101-94, but the comedy started before the two even left the floor.

In a postgame interview with CSNNE DeRozan was asked what the message was at halftime from coach Dewane Casey.

DeRozan — with Lowry looking devious in the background of the shot — was gracious.

“Just get [Lowry] the ball,” DeRozan smiled.

Pleased with the result, Lowry responded with a “That’s a good message right there!” before running off to the locker room.

The interview continued to be interrupted, with Raptors big man Jared Sullinger giving the camera a drive by “DeMar for President!”

New England Patriots RB LeGarrette Blount even showed up to show DeRozan some love.

Kevin Durant gets fouled by Stephen Curry, officials whistle Joe Johnson instead (VIDEO)

2 Comments

The Golden State Warriors are so talented, perhaps the officials are predisposed to blowing whistles in their favor. At least, that’s the only explanation you could give to a Utah Jazz fan after seeing what happened between Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, and Utah’s Joe Johnson on Thursday night.

As Durant came off a curl on the far side of the court, he used a screen set by Curry on Johnson.

With the ball in his hands, Durant rose to fire but found himself locked in arms with another player. Durant’s shot attempt helplessly bounced away as he shot, and officials whistled Johnson on the play.

Of course, a closer look reveals that the player Durant’s arms were tangled up with was … Curry.

Yes, Curry had arm locked what he thought was Johnson on the screen but was instead his teammate and MVP candidate.

It didn’t matter, as referees awarded Durant the free throws, of which he only made 1 of 2.

Perhaps that’s some solace?

Golden State beat Utah, 106-99.

DeMarcus Cousins trolls Joakim Noah on shooting form (VIDEO)

noah cousins
AP
3 Comments

New York Knicks C Joakim Noah has an awkward jumper and free throw technique, there’s no denying that. His two-handed, horizontal approach to shooting a basketball is ripe for criticism.

DeMarcus Cousins thinks so, at least.

During a game between the Sacramento Kings and the Knicks, Cousins decided to give Noah a little tongue-in-cheek trolling about his form.

Via Twitter:

Looks about right.

LeBron James, Cavaliers Rick-roll intro video for ’80s night

Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James (23) shoots over Miami Heat's Rodney McGruder (17) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
Associated Press
1 Comment

The 1980s were back in Cleveland Friday night. Well, not completely, Bernie Kosar wasn’t leading the Browns to contention (although man, could they use him now).

No, the ’80s were back in the form of the throwback orange Cavaliers uniforms. And to complete the theme, the Cavaliers players dressed up and Rick-rolled the intro video — they did the complete “classic” Rick Astley hit “Never Gonna Give You Up.” And it was awesome.

The Cavaliers won the game 114-84 over the Heat behind 28 from Kevin Love, but that was secondary to the intro video.