Improved Knicks no match for elite Mavericks

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The Knicks have been playing winning basketball lately, but the set of circumstances they faced heading into Thursday night’s contest against the Mavericks was simply too much to overcome. Playing for the fourth time in five nights, in the second game of a back-to-back, on the road, against one of the league’s elite teams, New York looked to be a step slow from the start, and trailed by as many as 26 points before falling by a final of 127-109.

It was a tough spot for the Knicks, but let’s be honest: they probably weren’t going to beat this Dallas team anyway. The Mavericks are elite — stacked with talent, size, and a multitude of scorers. They move the ball as well as any team in the league to get open shots. And against a sluggish and shorthanded Knicks team that was playing without Chauncey Billups for the sixth straight game due to a thigh injury, Dallas took advantage from the very start.

Amar’e Stoudemire opened the game by hitting just one of his first eight from the field, Carmelo Anthony started off 3 for 10, and by halftime, the Mavs had put up 72 points while holding New York to a dismal 34.2% shooting.

Stoudemire’s 18-point third quarter helped cut a Dallas lead that reached as many as 26 points down to 13, but his team wasn’t able to get any closer than 11 points the rest of the way.

Speaking of Stoudemire, he picked up his 16th technical foul of the season in the second quarter, after getting tangled up with Brendan Haywood while the two were fighting for position. If it stands, it will result in a one-game suspension, but there’s a pretty good chance it won’t. This one was extremely questionable, and once the level-headed folks at the league office take another look at it in the next day or so, it’s more than likely to be rescinded.

Coming into this contest, the Knicks had won three straight, four of their last five, and had posted a record of 6-3 since making the trade that brought Carmelo Anthony to New York city.  The team is certainly improved, and the circumstances may have conspired to make this already tough game in Dallas even tougher. But the bottom line is that the game may also be seen as a way to measure just how far away New York is from an overall talent standpoint to truly compete with the league’s top teams.

This gap isn’t what it once was when the season first started. It is still there, however, and it is still substantial.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.