Ryan Anderson

Appreciating Ryan Anderson and in turn, Stan Van Gundy


Lost in the Rashard Lewis-Gilbert Arenas shuffle was an interesting development: Ryan Anderson, a young player (though one not exactly exploding with potential) still on his rookie deal, had a ready-made offensive game that could essentially make Lewis replaceable. Anderson isn’t capable of matching all of Lewis’ strengths — he still has a ways to go as a post-up option, for example — but combined with Brandon Bass, the forward pairing can accomplish most of what Lewis was able to provide for a sliver of the price.

Zach McCann of the Orlando Sentinel took a look at some of Anderson’s per-minute and per-possession numbers, and his relative standing among his positional peers may surprise you.

Offensively, Anderson is a strong contributor. He won’t often be confused for a shot-creating star, but he’s a very solid complementary player who understands how to capitalize off of Dwight Howard’s presence. The stretch 4 template doesn’t usually come with strong rebounding skills, but Anderson also holds his own in that regard. There’s still a healthy separation in rebounding rate between Anderson and the elite rebounders at his position, but he’s competent enough — even with Howard gobbling up every rebound in sight — in that regard to dodge any serious concern.

Yet Anderson still doesn’t always get considerable playing time, and thus lacks the means with which to turn those strong per-minute numbers into equally strong per-game ones. As for the reason why, McCann is again on the case:

Obviously, numbers aren’t the be-all, end-all for determining how productive a player is. In fact, when these numbers were presented to Magic coach Stan Van Gundy, he sort of shrugged his shoulders.

“On all the statistical stuff he’s been our second-best player pretty much the entire year,” Van Gundy said. “He and Brandon [Bass], neither one of them, numbers will never be the problem.”

These numbers, of course, don’t factor in defense (other than blocks, an unreliable statistic in determining a good defender), and that’s a primary area where Anderson must improve. Anderson grasps what the Magic want out of him on defense, but he’s sometimes not quick enough on rotations and prone to youthful mistakes such as dumb fouls or jumping out too quickly on pick and rolls. That’s where Van Gundy wants to see improvement, and he isn’t interested as much in Anderson’s PER or true shooting percentage.

If he were playing for any number of other NBA coaches, Anderson would likely go about his hot-shooting business undisturbed. Defense would likely be emphasized in practice and in games, but Stan Van Gundy is among the few who will repeatedly make the decision to bench productive players on the basis of defense alone. As good as Anderson is, this is the right play for the Magic and Van Gundy’s system; if Anderson can’t or won’t defend, then SVG should endeavor to find a player who will.

Dwight Howard is the only standout defender on Orlando’s roster, regardless of what you may have been told about Earl Clark. That means that everyone else has to fall in line with the scheme, or else one of the top defenses in the league will collapse with the individual limitations of its component parts. There can be so few compromises, if only because the system already has to make up for the relative weaknesses of Hedo Turkoglu, Jameer Nelson, and a handful of others.

Anderson — and the same is true of Brandon Bass — needs to improve defensively if he’s to fully replace Lewis on his own rather than filling in for 20-minute bursts. More playing time may have been gifted him in other systems, but SVG knows no charity in his rotation, and every minute will need to be earned with defensive execution.

Chris Paul hopes Clippers develop real home court advantage this year

PLAYA VISTA, CA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Chris Paul #3 of the Los Angeles Clippers, Blake Griffin #32 and DeAndre Jordan #6 share a laugh during media day at the Los Angeles Clippers Training Center on September 26, 2016 in Playa Vista, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory copyright notice. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)
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At Clippers home games, you generally wouldn’t use the word “rockin'” to describe the atmosphere. With that, the Los Angeles Clippers are a good team at home, but not a whole lot better than they are on the road. Last season the Clippers won 29 games at Staples Center, 24 away from home. The season before they won 30 at home. The Clippers don’t defend their home court like other elite teams: The past two seasons combined the Clippers have won 19 fewer home games than the Warriors, 15 fewer than the Spurs, five less than the Cavaliers.

Chris Paul wants that to change.

Staples Center can get loud — it has for Kobe Bryant and the Lakers. Chris Paul isn’t laying the blame on the building or Clippers game operations, he told Dan Woike of the Orange County Register it’s on the players to give the fans something to cheer about.

“One of the biggest things for us is our home court hasn’t really been a home court,” Paul said. “I don’t know. For some reason we just haven’t made it a tough place to play.

“ … Obviously it’s our mentality. We’re the ones playing. We have to give our crowd something to cheer about, something to get behind. We’ve got to make Staples Center, for our home games, a tough place to play.”

“I feel like sometimes we’re a better road team than we are a home team, and that’s not good,” center DeAndre Jordan said. “I mean it’s good, but we want to be a great team at home and a really, really, really good team on the road. We need to figure out how to transition that, and we’ll be fine, but we’ve got to pick it up at home.”

Los Angeles is a city visiting players circle on the schedule — there’s a lot of fun to be had in the City of Angels. That can have opposing players less focused and not at 100 percent when they take the floor for the game, but the Clippers don’t seem to have that advantage. Do the Clippers relax more at home? Are they too comfortable?

The Clippers are an elite team, but if they are going to advance to the Western Conference Finals it’s not going to be one big thing but a lot of little ones that take them to the next level. Having Staples Center become a real house of horrors for opponents is one of those things. We’ll see if things are different for the Clippers this year.

Scottie Pippen’s “take me out to the ballgame” at Cubs game is… dreadful


It’s the biggest game the Chicago Cubs have played in years — and turned out to be its biggest win in more than five decades. Game six of the National League Championship Series. Win (as they did) and the Cubs are in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Time to bring out the big guns to sing “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” during the seventh-inning stretch.

They get Bulls legend Scottie Pippen — a good choice.

Except, he does not know that song. At all. This was almost Ozzy Osbourne bad.

Adidas has unveiled the “James Harden 1,” his first signature shoe with company

James Harden 1

The new James Harden signature shoe is out, and just like the player himself there is nothing quite like them out there.

Adidas signed Harden last year, and they went to work on a new signature shoe, a process Harden discussed in the press release about the shoes.

“This was my first time creating a shoe from the ground up,” Harden said. “With Adidas, we wanted to stand for something different, be true to who we are and that’s how we separate ourselves. This was a once in a lifetime opportunity and all the work we put in together is what makes this genuine. We’re open to each others’ opinions and we weren’t going to just put shoes on the shelves and say ‘This is James Harden.’ It’s built for how I play and you’ll see my style, different moods, the little details and stories that represent who I am.”

We’ll see how the shoe-buying public responds, but Adidas has banked on Harden with that 13-year, $200 million contract. The Curry line with Under Armour are doing well, although LeBron James and Kevin Durant dominate the market of guys still playing (of course, Jordans still dominate the market). Adidas wants to get a better foothold in the market.

Adidas released four different colorways of the Harden 1. Here’s one more look.

James Harden 1 colorways

Sure they’re meaningless, but you should still watch best plays of preseason

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In the grand scheme of the NBA season, these plays are meaningless.

That doesn’t make them any less entertaining.

So for your Sunday morning entertainment, here are the best plays of the preseason, as compiled by the people at NBA.com. Yes, there is some Stephen Curry shake-and-bake, some Kyrie Irving step back jumpers, but mostly there are a lot of dunks.

What else have you got to do for the next 12 minutes? Settle in and enjoy.