Memphis Grizzlies Celebrate

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Maybe the Spurs are going to miss Tony Parker

1 Comment

What you missed while driving around in reverse

Grizzlies 109, Spurs 93: Memphis has officially taken on the mantel of “the team nobody wants to face in the first round.” They play physically, they have a long front line, they have good athletes on the wing and they can score. Memphis is going to be a tough out.

The Grizzlies were about the worst team for the Spurs to run into with Tony Parker out injured. No team forces more turnovers than the Grizzles (15.6 percent of opponent possessions end in a turnover) and the Spurs without their point guard upped that to 23.1 percent of their possessions. The Spurs struggled to score as well, with no Spur starter in double figures. In fact, Gary Neal’s 14 points led the Spurs, but he needed 13 shots to get that. For Memphis, Tony Allen had 20 points on 8-of-9 shooting.

Timothy Varner of the fantastic Spurs blog 48 Minutes of Hell made a great point on twitter — when the Spurs are getting crushed in the regular season, they tend to just roll over. It’s like an energy saving defense mechanism, and they did it in this game.

But don’t let that take anything away from a Grizzlies team that has now recently beat the Lakers and Spurs. Nobody wants this team in the first round of the playoffs.

Pacers 109, Warriors 100: The stat that is the difference here — Indiana got to the free throw line 36 times and made 32 while the Warriors got to the stripe half as many times and made 13. A lot of times that leads to fans complaining about the refs, but this was simply a case of one team attacking the rim and getting the ball inside and one settling for jumpers. Indiana had 20 points in the paint, a sign of how they went at the Warriors, and with that drew fouls. Almost always the team with more foul shots was just the aggressive.

Raptors 96, Hornets 90: Jose Calderon owned this game and owned Chris Paul. Yes, you read that right. Calderon had 22 points and 16 assists and down the stretch attacked and got to the rim for buckets, then when the defense focused on him he kicked I out to a wide-open DeMar DeRozan who knocked down the three. Chris Paul on the other hand had a terrible night, couldn’t seem to penetrate or hit shots, and the Hornets offense fell apart.

Mavericks 101, Sixers 93: It’s fitting that a game between the two teams that get the most points out of their bench per game (Philly 40.1, Dallas 39.3) was decided by a bench player. Jason Terry just owned the second half and dropped 17 in the 24 minutes. He pretty much earned the Mavs a win himself.

Magic 116, Knicks 100: Let’s have a hand for our three stars of the game: Jason Phillips, David Jones, and Curtis Blair. Those would be your referees. These teams combined to shoot 97 free throws tonight. Yes, 97. In one game. There were more stops and starts than a baseball game.

Okay, the real story was Jammer Nelson, who put up 23 second half points as the Knicks had no answer for what to do with him coming off the high pick-and-roll. None. That was the ballgame. Or the game when nobody was shooting free throws.

Bucks 92, Pistons 90: Battle of the point guards — Rodney Stuckey had 25, Brandon Jennings 21 — and the Bucks won the kind of game they have to win to keep their slim playoff hopes alive. Rip Hamilton did play, but didn’t impress shooting 4-of-17 as he tried to shake off a lot of rust.

Lakers 90, Timberwolves 79: The Lakers were not on, but even when that goes wrong they are tall and long. And that was too much for the Wolves to handle. Andrew Bynum was defending well, Pau Gasol pulled down 17 boards, Lamar Odom had 12 points and 11 boards. Ugly game but the Lakers will take the ugly win. Oh, and Kevin Love had 13 and 11 to up his double-double streak to 47.

Rockets 103, Trail Blazers 87: The Rockets just owned this game from the second quarter on. Just owned. They got inside (52 points in the paint), they shot well (57.9) percent and we could go on and on but you get the point. This is a couple ugly losses in a row for the Blazers.

Watch Charles Barkley struggle to pronounce “Jonas Valanciunas” last season

Leave a comment

The Toronto Raptors were good last season, second best team in the East. That means the guys on Inside the NBA on TNT had to talk about them.

Which means Charles Barkley had to say “Jonas Valanciunas” a lot. Which is high comedy. While a lot of people struggle to say his name the guy is a solid NBA center who, with a little practice, you can say (and spell) his name pretty easily.

This comes from a YouTube user, via Reddit, with a hat tip to Eye on Basketball.

Watch highlights of USA’s 111-74 rout of Argentina in exhibition game

1 Comment

Argentina isn’t considered a medal contender heading into the Rio Olympics. Their golden generation — led by Manu Ginobili — has picked up a lot of speed on the downhill side of their careers at this point.

They didn’t provide much of a challenge for Team USA in an exhibition game Friday night in Las Vegas, one won by the USA 111-74. Kevin Durant impressed playing with his new teammates in dropping 23 points, Paul George had 18, and the Americans had their way in the game.

Which is what we’re going to see a lot of in Rio — the USA’s talent level is just steps above any other team in the tournament.

Kevin Durant: Nobody has said something negative to my face about joining Warriors

OAKLAND, CA - JULY 07:  Kevin Durant speaks to the media during the press conference where he was introduced as a member of the Golden State Warriors after they signed him as a free agent on July 7, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
4 Comments

When Kevin Durant chose the Warriors, he received criticism from all angles.

Fans burned his jersey. Charles Barkley decried the decision. Markieff Morris said, “That ain’t right.” Durant’s former Thunder teammates leaked their displeasure with the process.

Durant was so reluctant to face the backlash, he stayed in his bed luxurious rental house for two days.

It, uh, worked.

Michael Lee of Yahoo Sports:

Though he has heard some criticism from Barkley and fellow Hall of Famer Reggie Miller, various talking heads and people in social media who believe he has cheated the system and cut corners to a ring, Durant said the reaction to his choice hasn’t been too bad: “All that stuff happens on the Internet. I haven’t had one person come to me and say anything negative. … It’s easy for the critics on the outside to tell you what to do, to tell you how to play. I’m the one that’s going through it, so I can’t really worry about the outside noise. The work don’t stop. Everything stays the same.”

This is a good reminder how insulated NBA players, especially stars, can be.

And it adds to why Durant signing with Golden State makes sense. While we’re debating his legacy and discussing the backlash (and the backlash to the backlash and the backlash to the backlash to the backlash and the…), he’ll be playing high-level basketball with his friends in a desirable city for a max salary.

Sure, it’s not all rosy. Durant altered his relationship with his friend Russell Westbrook, and Durant will have to return to Oklahoma City for a game. There, he’ll face plenty of booing fans.

But, all in all, Durant should have little trouble tuning out the critics.

They’re too far away for him to hear them much.

US romps over Argentina in first Olympic exhibition

LAS VEGAS, NV - JULY 22:  Paul George #13 of the United States passes the ball up the court against Argentina during a USA Basketball showcase exhibition game at T-Mobile Arena on July 22, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The United States won 111-74.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Leave a comment

LAS VEGAS (AP) New team. Same old result.

Full of new star power – and dominant on the inside – the U.S. men’s basketball team opened its bid for a third straight Olympic gold medal Friday night with a 111-74 exhibition romp over Argentina.

A game that was over almost before it began showed the U.S. has to improve its shooting and conditioning. It also showed that there is plenty of talent among a group of players that seem to want to play well for each other and their country despite the absence of Olympic stalwarts Kobe Bryant and LeBron James.

“There’s a willingness from these guys to work on anything we need and to work hard,” coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “These are very good guys.”

A U.S. team that hasn’t lost a game in 10 years had little trouble with Argentina, which some consider a medal contender in Rio. Paul George scored 14 first-half points, Kevin Durant added 12, and the U.S. blew open the game early before an appreciative crowd on the Las Vegas Strip.

Even with Bryant retired and James taking this Olympics off, there was no real talent drop off on a team heavily favored to win gold once again. The depth of the U.S. showed as coach Mike Krzyzewski rotated players in and out, searching for the right combinations on a team with 10 new players from 2012.

“Nothing is for sure,” Durant said. “We want to get this gold and right now we have a job to do. We have to prepare the right way.”

Count the Argentines among those who were impressed at the first real game for the Olympic team.

“Obviously, they have the best talent and the best size in the world,” Argentina’s Luis Scola said. “That’s a big difference in their favor.”

The game was the first of five exhibitions the U.S. will play before traveling to Rio to defend the gold medal. The U.S. team has spent the last week practicing in Las Vegas in preparation for the tour and the games.

There weren’t any opening night jitters, though the U.S. shot only 45 percent and missed all but 14 of 41 3-pointers. With DeMarcus Cousins pulling down 15 rebounds in just 16 minutes, the U.S. dominated inside, outrebounding Argentina 53-30.

“The big thing is getting in shape and they are not there where they will be,” Krzyzewski said. “But we really have an inside presence on the boards.”

For Durant the game was a chance to play with a pair of his new Golden State teammates, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson. It was also a chance for Durant and Carmelo Anthony – the only two players from the 2012 team – to demonstrate that this will be their team in Rio.

Both players cheered from the bench as the minutes were spread around, jumping up to clap for teammates. Every U.S. player got quality time, with Green’s 12 minutes the least played by any American.

“We’re going to have fun and we’re going to enjoy ourselves,” Anthony said. “If it’s not fun it’s not worth it. We’re going to enjoy ourselves but at the same time we’re going to be focused in trying to get that gold medal.”

Durant finished as the game’s high scorer with 23 points, while George had 18 and Carmelo Anthony 17. Andres Nocioni had 15 for Argentina, while Manu Ginobili added 11 for Argentina, which lost to the U.S. in the semifinals of the 2012 Olympics.

Though at times little defense was played, there was plenty of offense to keep the crowd at the new T-Mobile Arena happy. The teams combined to put up 70 3-point attempts, 41 of them from the U.S.

Oddsmakers had made the U.S. a prohibitive 29.5-point favorite in what at times looked a lot like an NBA All-Star game. But while the U.S. team is loaded with 12 NBA players, the Argentines had only three on their roster and the talent difference showed.

While the team is full of new players, the gold medal run will be the last for Krzyzewski, the national coach for the last decade. His teams have lost only one game during his reign, which will end after the Olympics with San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich taking over.