Kobe MVP mission was entertaining, just like All-Star Game should be

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It was obvious Kobe Bryant was going hard after the MVP three minutes into the game.

That’s when, with the score tied just 6-6, Kobe got the ball in the right corner, drove baseline on Derrick Rose, the help defense was late and he went up-and-under for the kind of reverse jam he probably hasn’t done in a game in years. Many years.

“You could tell he started out from the start, he wanted to get the MVP,” Amar’e Stoudemire said of Kobe. “He was not passing the ball at all.”

Kobe looked energized — he had five dunks in the game and good luck remembering the last time he did that — and admitted later he wanted to put on a show for the hometown fans. He finished with 37 and flirted with the record for most All-Star Game points (44 by Wilt Chamberlain).

Elsewhere LeBron James had a triple double (29 points, 12 rebounds, 10 assists — the only other guy to do that in the All-Star Game was Michael Jordan). Amar’e Stoudemire was flying in and throwing it down to the tune of 29 points. Everybody was looking to lob to Blake Griffin.  Kevin Durant dropped 34 including the dagger three late (on an actual Kobe pass in the clutch, so you knew it was an exhibition).

The West won the 2011 All-Star Game 148-143, but nobody will remember the score. They will remember Kobe got his fourth All-Star MVP award (tied for most ever). They’ll remember his dunks. They’ll remember LeBron’s all-around game and Stoudemire’s dunks. They’ll remember Rihanna and Kanye at halftime. They’ll remember it was close at the end.

They’ll remember it was fun.

Which is exactly what it should be — an entertaining exhibition with some fond memories for later.

That drives some people crazy. They want it to feel like a regular season game — you know, with defense. Maybe some set plays in the half court rather than transition and isolation. A little teamwork. Some off the ball movement. They want to change the All-Star Game to make it mean something.

Why?

There are plenty of games that matter. There are plenty of meals, we need a little dessert. There should be a time and a place for the best athletes go just have fun and show their skills off. There’s a time to let them pretend they are on the playground and show off a little.

Some have suggested the NBA do what baseball does — have the conference that wins the All-Star Game get to be home team for the Finals.

“And just discount the 82 regular season games an just base it all on one game?” Kobe asked about that idea. “No, I think it’s fine the way it is. You can’t take it over the top with seriousness and all that.”

Same thing with the idea the NHL went with this season — name a couple captains and let them pick their team from the guys lined up on the wall. While that certainly is playground I’m not sure that works as well in basketball (especially when you think of the influence that agents and shoe companies and the like would try to exert over the process).

Don’t mess with what works. The game got a little competitive in the fourth quarter, and that added to the fun. The game was not clean, but energetic through the end. Well, Kobe wasn’t energetic at the end —  “Those dunks took my legs from me” — but Durant was knocking down threes and they were able to get enough stops on LeBron and Stoudemire for the West to win.

Is the NBA All-Star Game some cotton candy in the middle of the season? Yes. So what? Sometimes cotton candy is pretty damn tasty.

Warriors respond to Trump, say trip to D.C. will “celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion”

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Last spring during the NBA playoffs, Warriors coach Steve Kerr did not hesitate to criticize President Donald Trump. Stephen Curry also has taken issue with the president and some of his policies.

Saturday, the Warriors were going to discuss an invitation to Trump’s White House — a tradition in many sports where the champion is invited to meet the president and do a photo-op — but on Friday Curry said he would vote no. With that, Trump pulled his invitation.

Saturday the Warriors released a statement.

“While we intended to meet as a team at the first opportunity we had this morning to collaboratively discuss a potential visit to the White House, we accept that President Trump has made it clear that we are not invited. We believe there is nothing more American than our citizens having the right to express themselves freely on matters important to them. We’re disappointed that we did not have an opportunity during this process to share our views or have open dialogue on issues impacting our communities that we felt would be important to raise.

“In lieu of a visit to the White House, we have decided that we’ll constructively use our trip to the nation’s capital in February to celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion — the values that we embrace as an organization.”

That’s classier than some of the responses from others around the NBA to Trump.

The Warriors’ David West explained why the team was leaning toward backing out of going to the White House, and the players’ opposition to Trump.

There would be a number of charitable things the Warriors could do in the area, and the team’s high-profile would draw attention to whatever they choose to focus on. It’s a good move. Try to rise above this silly fracas over a photo-op and do some good.

Report: Suns’ Alan Williams suffers torn meniscus, will miss time

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Alan Williams is a guy who worked hard for his spot in the NBA. The UCSB alum started with a 10-day contract, then parlayed that into a Summer League deal where he shined. That evolved into a full season contract with the Suns last year, and they liked what they saw enough to give him a three-year deal this summer (for $17.4 million total).

But now the fan favorite is going to miss at least the start of the season due to a knee injury, reports Chris Haynes and Marc Spears of ESPN.

How much time Williams will miss will depend on the degree of the tear and the course of treatment, but he’s going to be out for training camp and the start of the season.

Williams was already going to be in a fight for minutes on a team fairly deep in the frontcourt with Marquese Chriss, Dragan Bender, Alex Len, Tyson Chandler, Anthony Bennett, and Jared Dudley. This setback does not help his cause.

Enes Kanter thanks Thunder fans in video, urges team to beat Warriors

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Enes Kanter loved playing in Oklahoma City.

Which made the fact he was traded to the Knicks for Carmelo Anthony difficult. Kanter had been through a lot, his political stance against the ruling party in his native Turkey led to his family being forced to publicly disown him (and his father being arrested and questioned multiple times), plus his passport being revoked while he was in Europe as Turkey tried to force him to return (where he would have been instantly arrested). He has said on multiple occasions that the people of Oklahoma City, and the Thunder organization, provided him a home when his native one was yanked away from him.

He said that again in a thank you and goodbye video to the people of Oklahoma City.

Kanter said he had “no hard feelings. I understand it’s a business.”

He also urged the now-stacked Thunder to go out and beat the Warriors.

NBA Twitter flips out over Carmelo Anthony trade to Thunder

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Well, that escalated quickly.

Carmelo Anthony wanted away from the Knicks badly enough that he relented in recently and added Cleveland and Oklahoma City to Houston as places he would waive his no-trade clause for. From there, it took almost no time for Oklahoma City and New York to work out a trade that sent Anthony to the Thunder for Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott, and a second-round pick.

NBA Twitter flipped out on the news. And that started with one of ‘Melo’s new teammates.

Or, is it…