Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Clippers

Weekend Baseline to Baseline: Up, down, and all around

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Friday Night

Hornets 110 Rockets 105 (OT): A fun little romp, but also yet another in a seemingly endless case of Houston working hard in a mad scientist’s lab to discover new ways to lose games. This time it was letting David West take over down the stretch, then playing zero defense in the extra frame. CP3 nailed the clinching jumper, then stole the desperation possession for a runaway layup just to be sure.  The Hornets have now won four in a row.

Warriors 122 clippers 112: Monta Ellis isn’t an All-Star, but he does a pretty mean impression. The Warriors kept peppering the Clippers with little bursts of offense to keep and spread the gap, and the Clippers just couldn’t find another gear. The Clips got turnover-heavy while Stephen Curry hit five threes. A weird step back for LA in-between solid games on either side.

Saturday Night

Bulls 99 Heat 96: A wild, exciting race to the finish… that never, ever should have been. The Bulls were without Joakim Noah, which is a bummer, but the Heat were without LeBron James, which is considerably worse, and lost Chris Bosh to an ankle sprain in the third. Still, the Heat kept coming. Particularly, Dwyane Wade kept coming. Three consecutive contested threes to end the game for Wade, and only a fortuitously terrible playset from the Heat on the final possession kept the ball out of Wade’s hands with a chance to tie. Derrick Rose was everything you’d dream he’d be, and continues to make his case for MVP. But to assess that this was a signature win for the Bulls without two of the Big 3 to end the game is preposterous. A good win in a season full of them, only.

Grizzlies 89 Mavericks 70: Welcome back, Dirk! You’re ejected, Dirk! Dirk Nowitzki returned from injury, didn’t play well, objected to a call strenuously, and bam, he was gone, just like that. Meanwhile, the Mavericks, without Tyson Chandler, decided that Brian Cardinal would be the one to check Zach Randolph for a while. That didn’t work out well. 23 and 20 for Z-Bo, while Darrel Athur added 17 as the Grizzlies chewed up the Mavericks inside and spit them out.

Sunday

Clippers 99 Lakers 92: If the Lakers lose to the Clippers while the country is watching football, does it count in the standings? The Clips will demand so as they put together a very Lakers-like performance, closing hard on the defending champs as Blake Griffin roused himself from a terrible afternoon. Griffin just started beating the crap out of the Lakers. I have no other word for it. Baby hooks, dunks, inside scoops, more dunks, the works. Lamar Odom, Pau Gasol, everybody got annihilated as Griffin went off. Meanwhile, Eric Gordon gave enough to keep a good day from Kobe on the shelf and the rest was your typical day of LA going through the motions. When it came down to it, the Clippers wanted it more. Yes, that felt as weird to write as it did for you to read it.

Spurs 110 Nuggets 97: Its’ entirely possible that this was the game that drove Nuggets management to the brink when we look back on it. Probably not considering the obscenely drawn-out nature of the Melo stuff, but still. The Nuggets had a double digit lead in the first. Then the Spurs woke up and handed them their bus tickets out of town. Ty Lawson had no interest in guarding the corner three, Richard Jefferson kept initiating the offense, and Parker had his step-back going. The Spurs hit another gear in the second quarter, and just like that it was over. Though no one told Melo it began, as he slept his way through a terrible shooting night (5 of 17 from the field). 30 for Parker in the win.

John Stockton working with Bucks point guards at training camp

SACRAMENTO, CA - APRIL 30:  John Stockton #12 of the Utah Jazz dribbles in Game five of the Western Conference Quarterfinals against the Sacramento Kings during the 2003 NBA Playoffs at Arco Arena on April 30, 2003 in Sacramento, California.  The Kings won 111-91.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by: Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
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The Bucks are coached by one of the greatest point guards in NBA history, Jason Kidd. But Kidd invited another legend of the position to camp to work with his point guards. John Stockton, the NBA’s all-time leader in assists and steals, was at Bucks practice on Thursday working with Michael Carter-Williams, Matthew Dellavedova and Giannis Antetokounmpo.

Not a bad person to learn from, especially since the Bucks have one of the weakest point-guard positions in the league.

Blake Griffin says he’s working on improving his three-point shot

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 21:  Blake Griffin #32 of the Los Angeles Clippers shoots a jumper over Serge Ibaka #9 of the Oklahoma City Thunder during a 100-99 loss to the Thunder at Staples Center on December 21, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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2016-17 is going to be a big year for Blake Griffin. He missed much of last season with a quad injury and a broken hand stemming from a punching incident, and he has the ability to opt out of his contract next summer. When Griffin was healthy, he was his usual All-Star self for the Clippers, but he played just 35 games. He’s healthy now, at the start of training camp, and he says he wants to improve his three-point shot.

From Dan Woike of the Orange County Register:

“I want to be someone who shoots from there confidently, for sure,” Griffin said after Thursday’s practice at UC Irvine’s Bren Events Center. “A lot of us power forwards, our strength is inside or our versatility. You look at the best power forwards, Anthony Davis, LaMarcus (Aldridge), Draymond (Green) … they can all shoot but they can all put the ball on the floor and they can all score inside. I don’t necessarily think falling in love with the 3-point shot is a good idea, but shooting it confidently from there is great.”

Not only has Griffin not hit his threes in his career (his overall mark from beyond the arc is an awful 27.1 percent) but he doesn’t take very many of them. The most threes he’s ever shot in a season is 44 in 2013-14, and he hit 12 of them. Griffin is only 27, so he’s theoretically not done improving as a player, but it’s hard to imagine a dramatic jump this far along when that hasn’t been a part of his game at all to this point.

 

Steve Kerr endorses shorter preseason to limit back-to-backs

OAKLAND, CA - JUNE 19:  Steve Kerr of the Golden State Warriors speaks to members of the media after being defeated by the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 7 of the 2016 NBA Finals at ORACLE Arena on June 19, 2016 in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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There are too many preseason games. The NBA has its reasons for playing them — namely, to allow for games in non-NBA markets — and sometimes they can be valuable for teams to experiment with rotations. But most teams play seven or eight preseason games, which is unnecessary. Warriors coach Steve Kerr agrees, according to the San Francisco Chronicle‘s Connor Letourneau:

“I kind of like the idea that’s been tossed around the last couple summers to start the regular season a little earlier, maybe a week early,” Kerr said Thursday afternoon after Warriors practice. “Play five exhibition games instead of eight. I kind of like that, just so you have fewer back-to-backs in the regular season.”

The NBA has floated the idea in the past of cutting the number of preseason games in order to stretch out the regular season, thereby lessening the burden of travel and back-to-backs. The NBA has made an effort this season to cut down on back-to-backs, and this would be a logical way to do that.

Hornets’ Batum won’t let big contract affect how he plays

MIAMI, FL - APRIL 20: Nicolas Batum #5 of the Charlotte Hornets drives on Joe Johnson #2 of the Miami Heat  during game two of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at American Airlines Arena on April 20, 2016 in Miami, Florida. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) Nicolas Batum said he isn’t planning to alter how he plays the game after signing a five-year, $120 million contract with the Charlotte Hornets.

And that’s just fine with coach Steve Clifford.

Clifford said Batum doesn’t need to put additional pressure on himself to score just because he’s now the highest-paid player in Hornets history. He told him to play how he plays.

“You don’t change the nature of how you play. I think guys get messed up with that,” Clifford said. “… I don’t think you try to reinvent yourself because the money changed. We gave him the money because he played so well. In my opinion he was an All-Star-caliber player last season when healthy.”

Batum was acquired in a trade with Portland before last season and turned out to be a gem for Charlotte, which won 48 games and tied for the third-best record in the Eastern Conference. Batum averaged a career-high 14.9 points and 5.6 assists while becoming one of the team’s top three go-to options.

Batum said he’s learned from experience that it’s not worth putting pressure on himself just because he signed a big contract.

He did in that 2012 after inking a four-year, $46 million deal to remain with the Portland Trail Blazers. While he still played well, he said it was pointless.

“I was a young guy at the time and I didn’t know what to expect,” Batum said. “Now I know. I know what I have to go through right now. I know what the views of the media and the public will be. I know that, and I’m good with it.”

For Batum, pressure no longer enters the equation because the Hornets trust him and believe in him.

“It’s more relief than pressure,” Batum said.

The Hornets made re-signing him their No. 1 priority, offering the Frenchman a huge deal about an hour into the free-agency signing period. Batum also received several offers from other teams shortly after the deadline, which he called flattering.

The 6-foot-8, 200-pound Batum enters the season as Charlotte’s best all-around player and a favorite among teammates.

“Guys are so much more comfortable when he’s out there on the floor because he makes it so much easier at both ends,” forward Marvin Williams said.

Williams said there’s a naturalness to Batum’s game, and he’s incredibly unselfish – he’s always looking for the better shot option.

“He likes to make the assist, and he likes to get everyone involved,” Williams said. “I think that is why so many people like playing with him. It’s why I love playing with him.”

And why Clifford views him as irreplaceable.

When Batum went down in the second half of last season with an ankle injury, the Hornets struggled to find their rhythm.

“He’s not a numbers guy to me,” Clifford said. “People can say, `Well, he’s making this or he’s making that (much money),’ but if he plays at the level he played at last year when he was healthy, we have a chance to be a really good team.”

The Hornets continue to work on 5-on-5 scrimmages extensively during practice as Clifford gets a feel for his team.

But there were several key players missing on Thursday.

Point guard Kemba Walker (knee) and center Cody Zeller (knee) remained out of practice while rehabbing from injuries. Guard Jeremy Lamb did not practice after stepping on a basketball and twisting his ankle, while Brian Roberts was held out after injuring his hamstring when he slipped on some water on the court. Clifford said he hopes to have Lamb and Roberts back in a few days.