Baseline to Baseline recaps: Where all good streaks must come to an end

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What you missed while… why weren’t you watching the Clippers beat the Heat? (That was our game of the night.)

Hornets 92, Magic 89 (OT): Orlando’s nine-game win streak ends because they shot just 39.1 percent in this one — not that they didn’t get good looks, they did. The shots just didn’t fall. That happens sometimes, you outplay the other team but can’t knock them down. The Magic have been hot shooting of late, so the off night shouldn’t come as a shock.

Pacers 102, Mavericks 89: Still no Dirk Nowitzki (that’s eight games missed), and Dallas coach Rick Carlisle was desperate enough for an answer start Alexis Ajinca at the four. Turns out that wasn’t it (although it did move Shawn Marion to the three, where he will be starting for Caron Butler the rest of the season). The Mavs miss Dirk’s offense and ability to hit a contested two, but the real problem is they haven’t played well defensively lately. Paul George’s 16 off the bench were big for Indy.

Hawks 104, Raptors 101: The Hawks struggled the second half of this game with the Raptors zone defense. There are a couple basic ways to beat a zone – pound it inside or shoot over the top of it. With the game on the line, Mike Bibby went for the latter and hit the game-winning three. The Hawks were in it because Jamal Crawford hit 12-of-23 shots for 36 points.

In the irony file, Hawks center Etan Thomas didn’t travel with the Hawks to Toronto because he was snowed in at his Atlanta home.

Bobcats 96, Bulls 91: Charlotte’s starters raced out to a 17 point lead, but the second string came in and the depth of these two teams became clear. Well, that or the Bulls have developed a slow start pattern. Either way, this was tied up with six minutes to go and it looked like the Bulls had slowed the new, running Bobcats down (well, they did, just 89 possessions). But the Bobcats did a great job of hard doubles on Derrick Rose late, not letting him take over (same with Boozer). The Bobcats offense is unimpressive, but if Stephen Jackson is hitting hard, contested shots they will get points. Enough to win.

Celtics 119, Kings 95: Really fast pace in this one — 99 possessions — and it turns out the old guys can still run a little. Big difference in this one: Kings 2-13 from three, Celtics 12-20.

Grizzlies 107, Pistons 99: Detroit went with a new starting lineup tonight — Tracy McGrady, Rodney Stuckey, Tayshaun Prince, Chris Wilcox and Greg Monroe — and it worked pretty well, the two starting lineups played each other about even. The Grizzlies bench destroyed the Pistons bench. That’s your ball game.

Spurs 91, Bucks 84: What a shock — the Bucks lost because their offense stinks. The Spurs played well and all, but you can stop the Bucks offense and that leads to wins. Not sure there is much else to say here.

Thunder 118, Rockets 112: This game was about what you’d expect — the Rockets make the Thunder really work for it, but in the end Houston had no answer for Kevin Durant (30 points) and Russell Westbrook (23).

Suns 118, Nets 109 (OT): Credit the Nets for playing hard despite all the Carmelo Anthony trade rumors, a lot of teams might have not brought the effort. Still, they had a 15-point lead early in the fourth and blew it. Steve Nash owned overtime, as he had 10 points and got most of those at the free throw line. Free throws in general were key for the Suns, who got to the line 20 more times than the Nets.

Lakers 115, Warriors 110: Along with Heat/Clippers, maybe the most entertaining game of the night. Monta Ellis had 38 points and was making plays that inspired Kobe Bryant to take over — and looking like vintage Kobe of five years ago — he hit shots and put up 39. It was quite a show those two put on, but Lamar Odom’s 16 fourth quarter points were key. The other key was the times — the spotty times, the Lakers were not consistent — they got the ball inside to whomever David Lee was guarding. The Lakers went right at him.

Jazz 131, Knicks 125: This is not the up-tempo game you normally expect the Jazz to play (96 possessions each team) but Utah shot 58.4 percent and hit 10 of 22 from three. They looked plenty comfortable as seven players got into double figures scoring.  For the Knicks, Shawne Williams hit seven threes in a half and finished with a game high 25 points.

Veteran NBA official Monty McCutchen to be head of referee development, training

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After 25 seasons running up and down the NBA hardwood and refereeing more than 1,400 games, NBA official Monty McCutchen got a promotion.

He officiated his last game Thursday night in Minnesota and will move to a desk at the league office where his new title is Vice President, Head of Referee Development and Training.

“Monty has earned the respect of players, coaches and his peers during an exemplary career as an NBA official,” said Senior Vice President, Head of Referee Operations Michelle D. Johnson (who started on the job in October).  “He understands as well as anyone what it takes to be an outstanding referee and how the league can best support its officials.  With his wealth of insight and experience, Monty is uniquely suited for a leadership role in our officiating program.”

“I’m excited for the opportunity to channel my passion for the officiating profession in a new way,” McCutchen said.  “While I’ll miss officiating games, I’m grateful to continue working with our incredibly talented referee staff as part of an organization so dedicated to excellence and innovation.”

Despite what some fans like to blast on Twitter (especially during the playoffs), NBA officials are the best trained and flat-out best basketball referees in the world (if you don’t think so, watch the college/scab referees from the last lockout of the refs, it was painful). Could they improve? Sure. Hopefully, McCutchen can help do that in his new position.

Kristaps Porzingis officially day-to-day, questionable vs. OKC

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Knicks fans can exhale now.

There was understandable concern after face of the franchise Kritaps Porzingis had to leave the game in Brooklyn Thursday night following a non-contact injury.

Turns out there is nothing to worry about. After the game, Porzingis spoke to the media and was standing on the leg, a good sign. By Friday, after a day of treatment, he was doing well. Officially Porzingis is day-to-day and may sit out Carmelo Anthony‘s return to Madison Square Garden Saturday, but the injury is nothing serious. Ian Begley of ESPN has the details.

Porzingis’ knee was “worked on” on Friday and the discomfort in his knee decreased, league sources told ESPN. It is unclear if Porzingis underwent an MRI or had X-rays to further determine the extent of the injury but sources say he did not undergo significant testing because it wasn’t warranted based on the state of the injury.

Good. We don’t need another star down with a major injury this season.

Especially Porzingis, who has led the Knicks to a 15-13 record (sixth in the East, in the playoffs) while putting up All-Star numbers: 25.5 points per game, shooting 39.5 percent from three, plus grabbing 6.6 rebounds a game. Maybe more impressive is how he has anchored a solid Knicks defense this season with his rim protection. Stay healthy and he should make his first All-Star team this season.

Report: Cavaliers not willing to put Nets pick in potential trade packages

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When the Cleveland Cavaliers traded Kyrie Irving to Boston last summer — at Irving’s request — they got something Danny Ainge had held onto for years: The Brooklyn Nets 2018 unprotected first round pick.

From the first moment the Cavaliers got the pick there was speculation they might flip it to get LeBron James more help to chase a title this season (and then, ideally, get him to re-sign with the team next summer). Yet, every utterance from the Cavaliers front office on and off the record was that the pick was untouchable. Consider it LeBron insurance should he leave, and if he stays they can add some good young depth.

Now approaching a third of the way into the NBA season, with the Cavaliers looking good but a clear step behind Golden State or Houston (and with Brooklyn playing better than anyone expected), has their position on the pick changed? No, reports Sean Deveney at The Sporting News.

Nearly two months into the season, circumstances have changed for the Cavaliers, but according to league executives, one thing that has not changed has been Cleveland’s unwillingness to part with that Nets’ pick, even as Brooklyn has exceeded expectations, thus dinging the value of the pick.

“They would be open to a deal by all indications,” one general manager told Sporting News. “But they’re not talking about that pick. That’s the Plan B for the LeBron stuff and from what I know, they don’t want to budge on it.”

It’s an interesting team building philosophical debate for the Cavaliers: When you have a reasonable shot at a title is it better to go all in for the big prize, or do they need to think about what is next, especially with LeBron’s future unsure? (Cleveland is not a title favorite, however, they are still the favorite to come out of the East in the playoffs, and if the Cavs reach the Finals they have a puncher’s chance at least.)

The Cavaliers seem to be leaning toward keeping the pick and thinking a little about the future. The Cavaliers do have their own first round pick — which will land in the mid- to late 20s — to potentially thrown in a trade. It’s a first-round pick, if not a terribly valuable one.

On top of this, just how good the Nets have been must factor into the Cavaliers’ decision. If the season ended today, the Nets pick would be 10th heading into the lottery (which has a 1.1 percent chance of jumping up to the top pick, a 4 percent chance of jumping up to the top three picks, and an 87 percent chance of staying 10th). On our recent podcast looking ahead at the draft, NBC’s Rob Dauster said what a lot of scouts have said: After about player 8, there is a drop off. If the scrappy Nets keep playing this well as the trade deadline approaches, do the Cavaliers change their calculus?

The Cavaliers have reportedly reached out to teams about big men — the Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan (available), the Grizzlies’ Marc Gasol (the team says not available) — but it’s hard to imagine the Cavs getting an impact player that can help them get closer to another title without throwing in the Brooklyn pick. The Clippers aren’t going to take Tristan Thompson and the Cavs pick for Jordan, they will need more.

This is going to be an interesting trade deadline, and Cavaliers are going to be in the middle of it all.

Adam Silver is honest: NFL more likely to expand to Europe than NBA

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Basketball is a much bigger sport in Europe than American football (not to be confused with the futball that rules European sports).

However, in reality, the NFL is far more likely to put a team in London than the NBA. Logistics is why, and why the NBA is much more strongly considering a team in Mexico City (there will be a D-League in the Mexican capital within a season or two).

Adam Silver addressed the NFL’s scheduling advantages for a London team, speaking to Marc Stein of the New York Times.

For the NBA teams closest to London — Northeast teams such as the Knicks or Celtics — the flight time from their cities to London or Mexico City are about the same (a little over six hours). However, for a team such as Miami it is just a little over 3:30 to Mexico City and nearly five hours more than that to London. And as you move West and get to teams from Los Angeles or Denver — not to mention the three teams in Texas — the trip to Mexico City is less than a cross-country flight to play those East Coast teams.

I could see the NBA putting an All-Star Game in London someday, but even that would require a longer break around the showcase game than exists now.

I’m not about to speculate how an NFL team would draw in London, if they could sell out the required luxury boxes and expensive seats, or if they could help broaden the league’s shrinking television audience. But it makes a lot more sense for that league to explore the idea than it does the NBA.