Miami Heat v Los Angeles Lakers

NBA Christmas Day: Naughty and Nice

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With five games on the slate yesterday, we ran down what happened in Baseline To Baseline and broke down Heat-Lakers.  Here’s who left candy in your stocking and who left coal.

 

Who’s was nice:

Monta Ellis: When Ellis is on, he’s an inferno. And the Blazers yesterday were powerless to stop him. With 39 points, he was en fuego, and for a Blazers team that plays pretty good defense but struggles on offense, that’s th equivalent of a death sentence. If Ellis can take the next step and not only be a leader in points per game but in terms of getting his team to play consistently, the Warriors have the talent to make a second-half run. But for a night at least, they’ll be happy with Ellis’ ability to create his own shot, which is nearly second to none in this league.

Kevin Durant: Well, say hey, KD. Durant had been good this season. He really had. But yesterday may have been the game that gets him back on track to being considered one of the true greats in this league. 44 points, with a barrage of those lift-up jumpers, as well as moves to get him to the line where he was 12-15. 21 points in the 3rd, and it was a whole different ballgame for both teams.

The Knicks Defense: I know. We were shocked, too.  The Knicks held the Bulls without a field goal for over eight minutes in the fourth quarter and ran away with a huge win, their second win over the Bulls this season. The Knicks rotated well, cajoled the Bulls into playing their tempo, and stayed consistent with their double-teams, moving Derrick Rose further and further baseline which made his drives harder. Cutting off Carlos Boozer on the pick and roll, and suddenly the Bulls’ offense was a fish out of water. That’s a formula the Knicks could use in the playoffs. Geez, it looks like the Knicks may make the playoffs. How things can change in a year.

LeBron James: Wow. It was one of those games where you remember the total and complete impact James can have on the game. He got away from the drive-and-jump-pass nonsense he’s done all season, and went back to slinging perimeter passes, working out of the pick and roll, and most importantly, pushing the ball in transition. The Heat ran the Lakers out of the building, and James was a huge part of that, making defensive stops, snaring the rebound, and then pushing the fast break. His touch passing with Wade in transition is simply as electrifying as we thought it could be. James had his most MVP-like performance against LA, and was the biggest reason they walked out with a big win.

Who was naughty:

Al Harrington: The Thunder are a good defensive team, and have some length and athleticism to challenge stretch fours. But Harrington was off all day. He finished with 9 points and 6 turnovers, and it was his disappearing act that left the Nuggets without a final chamber left to fire.

Paul Pierce’s 4th Quarter: Pierce was brilliant for three quarters of basketball in Orlando, and looked like the rottweiler clamping its jaws down on the poodle and shaking for all its worth. But then the fourth quarter came, and Orlando started to send doubles at him consistently, including a very active one from Hedo Turkoglu, and Pierce vanished. That fourth quarter is his time, and the Celtics depend on him to produce then, especially when Ray Allen is having a bad day like he was yesterday. Pierce wasn’t having a bad day, he was having a great day, and the Magic just took him out of it. Not a great holiday for the Truth.

Pau Gasol: Someone apparently forgot to tell Gasol that the Heat are weak inside and can’t guard him. Gasol finished with 17 points on 17 shots and was outworked at both ends of the floor by fellow yogurt specialist Chris Bosh. Gasol is the best big man in the game today and simply didn’t effect enough force on either end. He allowed buckets and didn’t create them. with Bryant trying to shoulder the load again, Gasol needed to come through. Instead he faltered, and LA walks out with their second straight blasting on Christmas Day. Bah humbug.

Kevin Durant says he appreciates fans who heckle him to get a release in their lives

LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 15:  Kevin Durant #35 of the Golden State Warriors poses for selfies with fans before a preseason game against the Los Angeles Lakers at T-Mobile Arena on October 15, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant is a basketball villain.

To most fans, NBA players are characters in an elaborate plot that is enacted live and on televisions nightly. Some players are loved, others loathed, for what they do in this grand saga.

Durant committed a basketball sin by leaving the Thunder for the Warriors, the team that eliminated Oklahoma City in the playoffs last season. It was the easy way out. It made Golden State too good.

So, Durant gets booed and jeered. His jersey gets burned. His name is smeared.

But Durant is also a real person who committed no actual ethical or moral violation by switching employers. And unfortunately, too many fans don’t acknowledge the difference between Durant the basketball character and Durant the real person – which means the attacks at Durant the basketball character often venture into personal territory for Durant the person.

At least Durant says he doesn’t mind the fans who don’t make the distinction.

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

He wants all of his fans, including the negative ones, to know that he’s appreciative of their support.

“It’s fun, man, because it’s entertainment,” Durant said. “And I appreciate them letting us give them that opportunity, that experience.

“So if you want to heckle or if you want to cheer, as long as you’re getting a release from whatever is going on in your normal life, that’s cool. That’s what life is about. You have to take the good with the bad.”

This is the healthiest approach Durant can take. Given the criticism directed at him, anything else would have him holed up inside for days.

Iman Shumpert: I won’t go to Donald Trump’s White House if Cavaliers win title

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 07:  Iman Shumpert #4 of the Cleveland Cavaliers looks on in the first half against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on December 7, 2016 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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A couple Cavaliers predicted NBA champions wouldn’t visit the White House with Donald Trump as president. LeBron James was noncommittal.

But Iman Shumpert – who had strong words about Cleveland beating the Warriors in the Finals again – took a hard line.

Shumpert, in a Q&A with Karizza Sanchez of Complex:

Will you go to Trump’s White House if the Cavs win the championship again this year?

I’m not going to the White House.

People started boycotting New Balance after the company seemed to voice support for Trump. Kanye West recently said he would’ve voted for Trump if he had voted. Would you still wear Yeezys?

I understand people’s stance on Trump. I can’t get caught up in the racial, sexist bullshit he’s got going on. That’s his personal thing, ya dig? But I just don’t think he can make anything shake like that. He not finna start no civil war out here. I do think he’s crazy—straight up. I think he did that stuff to get people to think he’s willing to shake it up. But did I vote for him? No. The other stuff that comes with him, I can’t get with. But now that he’s here, I’m not finna drag my feet. I gotta work here, at least until the offseason, if I wanna go get a crib in the Islands.

Remember, Shumpert said he’d kneel for the national anthem before reversing course. Committing to meaningful protest is far easier than following through.

Any NBA champion who declines an invitation to the White House will be labeled as unpatriotic by the type of people who measure patriotism by the quantity and size of American flags and have forgotten this country was founded on a healthy irreverence for the political elite.

I understand why anyone would be leery of glad-handing with Trump, whose rhetoric is white nationalist and anti-constitutionalist. But Trump has also lied at an unprecedented rate for a presidential candidate. We have little idea what he’ll do by the time the next NBA champion is crowned, and given the respect the office deserves, Shumpert might have second thoughts if the Cavs repeat.

Draymond Green: Warriors laughed at Jazz coach Quin Snyder for late timeouts

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After trailing the Warriors by 25 last night, the Jazz cut the deficit to five early in the fourth quarter. Golden State re-inserted starters and pushed lead back to double digits.

Still, Utah coach Quin Snyder called three timeouts in final 1:05 with Utah never closer than seven – a strategy that earned scorn from Draymond Green.

Green, via CSN Bay Area:

“We were laughing at Quinn Snyder who kept calling timeouts,” Draymond told reporters after the game. “Like bro, you’re down 10 with six seconds left, it’s kinda over my man.”

“Just let us go to the restaurant and have a good dinner; just chill,” Draymond added. “That’s what we were laughing at.

The Warriors travelled hundreds of miles to Utah, and the teams battled for hours. What was a few more minutes for the Jazz to maximize their miniscule chance of a comeback? Honestly, I’m surprised how often teams throw in the towel in those situations.

Besides, it was actually an eight-point difference with nine seconds left for Snyder’s final timeout. The Jazz were down just two four-point plays. There was plenty of time for that.

Nine-year veteran Eric Gordon finally chose his team, and he’s clicking with Rockets

AUBURN HILLS, MI - NOVEMBER 21: Eric Gordon #10 of the Houston Rockets tires to get a shot off against the Detroit Pistons at the Palace of Auburn Hills on November 21, 2016 in Auburn Hills, Michigan. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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A New Orleans restricted free agent in 2012, Eric Gordon signed a max offer sheet with the Suns and infamously declared his heart to be in Phoenix.

New Orleans matched anyway.

“I knew it wasn’t going to happen,” Gordon said. “I knew they were going to bring me back all along.”

So why make those statements? Why alienate New Orleans fans?

“You just never know what a team might do or not,” Gordon said.

Gordon been around long enough now to know you never know, even when you’re certain you do. But this much he clearly believes: In his ninth NBA season and on the first team he picked, he’s happy with the Rockets.

Gordon was drafted onto the Donald Sterling, pre-Blake Griffin Clippers, who had made the playoffs just four times in the previous 32 years and had developed a reputation for cheapness and disarray. They went 19-63, 29-53 and 32-50 in Gordon’s three years in Los Angeles. Yet he says, “I enjoyed my time there.”

He was traded to New Orleans as the centerpiece of the Clippers’ package for Chris Paul, and he doesn’t look back on his time with the Hornets/Pelicans quite so fondly. “Nobody was on the same page over there,” Gordon said. “It was just different. We had the talent there, and things just didn’t work out.”

Gordon admits he sometimes wonders what would’ve happened if he had gone to the Suns. But they haven’t made the playoffs and are on their fourth coach since his offer sheet. “After looking back on it now, they had a lot of chaos and turmoil there, too,” Gordon said.

So, Houston is a welcome reprieve.

Gordon’s first unrestricted free agency yielded a four-year contract worth more than $52 million. He’s averaging 17.0 points per game, his highest mark in five years. He has been healthy after after missing 173 games in five years with New Orleans. And the Rockets are 15-7, on pace for what would easily be Gordon’s most successful season.

Playing with James Harden and for Mike D’Antoni – whose fondness for Gordon dates back to their gold-medal run with Team USA in the 2010 World Championship – has treated Gordon well. Houston is focused on offense, Gordon’s specialty, and its system accentuates his strengths.

Gordon leads the NBA with seven open 3-pointers per game, which he’s converting at 41.3% clip:

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Notice the other Rockets on that list: Ryan Anderson and Trevor Ariza. Benefitting from playing alongside Harden – an attention-tracker and willing passer – is not unique.

But Gordon does more than just rely on Harden to get him open shots. Since moving to the bench with Patrick Beverley healthy, Gordon has proven particularly valuable when Harden sits.

Houston scores 118.7 points per 100 possessions with Harden on the floor, per NBAwowy!. That mark obviously plummets without Harden, one of the NBA’s best offensive players.

Gordon has prevented it from falling too far, though.

He scores more points per 36 minutes (15.5 to 28.5) and does so with a higher true shooting percentage (56.0 to 62.5) from with Harden to without. He also handles more playmaking, increasing his assists per 36 minutes (2.4 to 4.1), though also, disproportionally, his turnovers per 36 minutes (1.5 to 3.6).

Still, Gordon’s effect on the Rockets’ offense without Harden is tremendously positive.

  • Houston’s offensive rating without Harden – with Gordon: 107.7
  • Houston’s offensive rating without Harden – without Gordon: 86.7

Propping up the Rockets’ Harden-less offense has made Gordon an early contender for Sixth Man of the Year. Here are the win-share leaders among eligible players:

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Given voting history, ranking eligible players by points per game is probably more predictive. It’s at least even more flattering to Gordon:

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Lakers guard Lou Williams deserves to be the early favorite for the award. I’m also quite high on Spurs guard Patty Mills.

But Gordon belongs solidly in the mix.

It might not be the stardom the Clippers predicted when they drafted him No. 7 or New Orleans envisioned when it twice acquired him, but at least Gordon is happily contributing to a winner. After so much controversy – both invited (his Suns saga) and uninvited (being part of the Chris Paul trade) – he sounds happy in Houston.

“You just try to stride it out with whatever team you’re on. So, you know, it’s been a unique situation,” Gordon said. “But here, it’s been good.”