Who goes No. 1 in the NBA Draft?

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If you had asked “Who is going No. 1 in the 2011 NBA draft?” before the college basketball season started, the consensus was North Carolina’s freshman Harrison Barnes.

Except Barnes is shooting 38.2 percent this season and 29.3 percent from three. He has not lived up to the hype and is sliding down the boards (although not far, DraftExpress has him at No.3).

Replacing him in the consensus top spot was Kyrie Irving of Duke, the freshman handling the decisions for the nation’s number one team. He is shooting 45.2 percent from three and 58.7 percent inside the arc. He looks like the kind of point guard that can run an NBA team.

Except Coach Mike Krzyzewski announced on his “Basketball and Beyond with Coach K” show on XM Radio this week that Irving may out for the season with a toe injury. Which is likely to hurt his draft stock.

So who is No. 1?

(Yes, there will be a draft even if there is a lockout. The draft at the end of June comes before the expiration of the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. However, no draft pick can be signed until after July 1 — when the lockout will happen — so they will live in a bit of limbo.)

Predicting now is a bit of guesswork, this was always a pretty wide-open class and recent performances have made it more so. The smart money now is on Perry Jones of Baylor. The power forward has long been considered maybe the best long-term prospect in the class because GMs always love bigs. He has been good but not “nobody is taking the top spot from me” good so far.

So guys like Kentucky’s newest greatest freshman Terrence Jones or overseas players such as Jonas Valenciunas or almost-Kentucky player (except he played as a pro already) Enes Kanter have a shot.

Basically, it’s wide open. This season the draft has quality but not the clear-cut, John Wall type of “this guy is No. 1 no question” type of guy.

Which has positives for us fans — this season, the games (and post-season workouts) will matter more than ever. Just don’t be too sure about who is the top pick.

Adam Silver jokingly thanks Magic Johnson for paying for All-Star Legends Brunch

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The NBA held its annual All-Star Legends Brunch last weekend. Jerry West, James Worthy, Bill Walton and Magic Johnson were honored.

And NBA commissioner Adam Silver delivered a great line while addressing the event.

Silver, via Steve Aschburner of NBA.com:

“Magic, thank you for paying for the brunch today.”

So, that’s why Johnson got fined for $50,000 for tampering for innocuous comments about Giannis Antetokounmpo.

Nate ‘Tiny’ Archibald reveals he’s living with incurable heart disease

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The National Basketball Players Association and NBA set up health screenings for former players.

Nate “Tiny” Archibald, who starred for the Kansas City Kings and Boston Celtics, took advantage. Unfortunately, he learned a difficult outcome.

Jackie MacMullan of ESPN:

IT WAS DECEMBER 2016 when Archibald learned of his diagnosis, during a free screening at the New York offices of the NBPA. And now, more than a year later, he’s still reeling from the news.

“What I have is really rare,” he says. “There’s no pills, nothing they have found that works. I’m being tested all the time, just hoping, you know?

“My [heart] could go any minute. But I’m not ready for that. I want to be around for a long time.”

The medical community has had little success solving the riddle of amyloidosis. For those who suffer from it, aside from participating in clinical trials, or the possibility of a heart transplant, which at Archibald’s age may not be viable, there isn’t much that can be done.

We celebrated Archibald’s 69th birthday last fall with this highlight video. If you’re not familiar with the 6-foot-1 guard’s exciting game, get acquainted:

Hopefully, Archibald gets his wish and sticks around a long time.

Jeremy Lin: I believe J.J. Redick

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76ers guard J.J. Redick explained then apologized for saying what sounded like a slur for Chinese people, claiming he was tongue-tied.

Nets guard Jeremy Lin:

Lin’s Asian-American heritage helps make him very popular with the same people most offended by Redick. Lin vouching for Redick will likely go a long way in diffusing tension.

Hornets dropping GM Rich Cho, will reportedly pursue Mitch Kupchak

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Update: Hornets release:

The Charlotte Hornets announced today that the team will not extend the contract of General Manager Rich Cho. The Hornets will begin a search for a new general manager immediately.

“I want to thank Rich for all of his hard work with the Charlotte Hornets organization through the years and wish him and his family the best in the future,” said Hornets Chairman Michael Jordan. “Rich worked tirelessly on behalf of our team and instituted a number of management tools that have benefited our organization. We are deeply committed to our fans and to the city of Charlotte to provide a consistent winner on the court. The search will now begin for our next head of basketball operations who will help us achieve that goal.”

 

Last spring, the Hornets exercised their option on general manager Rich Cho for this season. It wasn’t exactly a strong vote of confidence without a contract extension.

Now, it’s becoming even more clear he’s a lame duck.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Cho has had plenty of hits and misses as general manager, including a year with the Trail Blazers. But the misses have added up in Charlotte. The Hornets’ next general manager will inherit:

Kemba Walker helps, but he can’t do it alone. This bloated payroll leaves little flexibility for roster upgrades – necessary to lift Charlotte into strong playoff contention. Walker will become an unrestricted free agent in 2019, and affording him could be tricky.

This is not a good job (relative to the other 29 NBA general manager jobs, of course).

Hornets owner Michael Jordan certainly plays into that. In one of the biggest gaffes of the Cho era, Charlotte rejected the Celtics’ offer of four first-round picks for the No. 9 pick in the 2015 draft, just to pick Frank Kaminsky. (Boston wanted Justise Winslow.) Was that Cho’s call or Jordan’s?

Cho takes the fall, though. That’s how this works.

Jordan’s ownership also means he gets to pick the replacement. It’s surely not a coincidence he’s leaning toward Mitch Kupchak (who played at North Carolina) and Buzz Peterson (who played with Jordan at North Carolina).

Kupchak fizzled late, but his overall tenure with the Lakers was a success. Has the game passed him by, or did recency bias unfairly paint him unfavorably? We might get to find out.