Baseline to Baseline Weekend Edition: Knicks Gone Wild

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What you missed this weekend while worrying that your extra virgin olive oil isn’t such a virgin

Celtics 104 Bulls 92 (Friday): I know the Bulls thought they were an elite team. The Celtics, however, are currently the only Eastern team (and maybe the only NBA team) at that level right now. If we’re looking at matchups in a potential playoff series, the fact that Kevin Garnett outright obliterated an admittedly still finding his legs Carlos Boozer is going to jump off the page and smack us around a bit. Derrick Rose is spectacular and his ability to create, then lean away from contact in mid-air gives him what can only be described as special powers against the Celtics. Unfortunately, Shaquille O’Neal has a neater super power: being much, much, much bigger than Joakim Noah and bullying him like Noah skipped a grade then got assigned to the same gym class with the jocks. Boston is outright terrifying at this point. Basically the Celtics are very outright.

Magic 104 Pistons 91 (Friday): Detroit was so bad they lost to an Orlando team that pretty much resembled the extras from “The Walking Dead.”

Milwaukee 96 Magic 85 (Saturday): Milwaukee was so bad they only beat an Orlando team that was only able to suit up 8 players by 11. There was a lot of sneezing. The end.

Bobcats 91 Nets 84 (OT) (Friday): The score was 33-32 at the half. It very well may have been the worst first half in professional basketball history. Here. Let us never speak of it again.

Rockets 127 Grizzlies 111 (Friday): The Rockets looked like they are back!

Bulls 119 Rockets 116 (OT) (Saturday): The Rockets are not back. The Rockets had this game. Had it. Down cold. Lock, stock, and barrel. Then Derrick Rose took over, with a series of whirlish-dervish one-way-back-slash passes and one very killer off-the-dribble three he should never have gotten due to the fact that Houston should have fouled, fouled, and then fouled again up three, I don’t care if Derrick Rose’s three-point reliability is kind of a neat new trick. Luis Scola also pulled off a very impressive Dream Shake impersonation that manages to out-fake I’m pretty sure every Bull on the floor, several on the bench, and a few that are playing overseas. Alas, Houston falls again.

Knicks 100 Hornets 92 (Friday): The Knicks may be back. For Emeka Okafor with all his might, all his improvement, for every way that Chris Paul should dominate Raymond Felton, the Knicks ran roughshod. Amar’e Stoudemire at this point is nearly unstoppable and the Knicks are firing on all cylinders. Chris Paul is strikingly passive in the second halves of games and you have to wonder if the health is all there. The Knicks are creating easy shots for themselves and hard ones for their opponents. The Hornets are in the exact opposite condition.

Knicks 116 Raptors 99 (Sunday): Yup, Knicks are probably back.

Spurs 107 Wolves 101 (Friday): There are meltdowns, there are colossal meltdowns, and then there’s the Wolves in this game. An utter self-demolition as they gave the Spurs an opening, then stood around guffawing as the Spurs hit that fifth gear from nothing. Kevin Love was not good, George Hill was very good, and the Wolves looked like they had absolutely no brain running the body for the last quarter. The Wolves could really have used a significant weapon down low they could turn to who wouldn’t get railroaded by Tim Duncan. Instead they had Darko Milicic (who had a fine game the following night against Cleveland).

Wizards 83 Blazers 79 (Friday): This was an unhappy game. John Wall was bad and frustrated. The Blazers lost to the Wizards, despite John Wall having a bad game and being frustrated. This was a joyless, coal mine shift of a game.

Suns 105 Pacers 97 (Friday): Channing Frye had 29 points. So, you know, the Pacers may have some trouble with non-traditional positional adjustments.

Dallas 93 Jazz 81 (Friday), Dallas 105, Kings 103 (Saturday): Eight quarters for the Mavs this weekend, points produced: 23, 16, 27, 27, 28, 26, 26, 24. Steady light a freight train, sharp like a razor.

PBT Podcast: Breaking down rookie class’s start to NBA season

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Markelle Fultz has barely seen the court. Lonzo Ball has had a couple of triple-doubles but his shot is way off, and he’s drawing extra scrutiny thanks to his father. Right now, Danny Ainge looks like the smartest guy in the room trading down and walking away with Jayson Tatum. Some of the best players out of this draft early — Kyle Kuzma, Donovan Mitchell — were drafted well down the board.

It’s been a draft class with real highs, some ugly lows, some polarizing figures — and Kurt Helin and Dan Feldman of NBC Sports break it down.

They go through all the guys taken in the lottery and discuss what they have seen, then talk about some of the guys outside the draft who have had strong seasons so far.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

Interviewer: LeBron James wasn’t dissing Kyrie Irving

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LeBron James on Isaiah Thomas, via Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

“It’s been a while since I’ve had that clear-cut guy who can get guys involved but also score at the same time,” James told B/R Mag.

That looked like a shot at Kyrie Irving. But with more context, it clearly wasn’t.

Beck:

It seems LeBron was saying it’s been a while that he’s had “that clear-cut guy who can get guys involved but also score at the same time.” If he was slighting Kyrie Irving, LeBron was also slighting Dwyane Wade – and I doubt LeBron would do that.

LeBron and Kyrie probably aren’t above taking subtle shots at each other. But this seems like a case of Beck, after hearing LeBron’s words aloud and in context, not realizing how a trimmed version would read as text. It’s unfortunate that people initially got the wrong impression, but good on Beck for clearing it up.

Missouri: Potential No. 1 pick Michael Porter Jr. likely out for rest of season

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Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. – maybe the top contender to supplant European guard Luka Doncic as the No. 1 pick in the 2018 NBA draft – had his campaign undercut after it barely began.

Missouri Basketball:

Michael Porter, Jr. will undergo surgery on Tuesday, Nov. 21, in Dallas, Texas. The procedure, a microdiscectomy of the L3 and L4 spinal discs, has a projected recovery time of three-four months and will likely cause him to miss the remainder of the season. Michael is expected to make a complete recovery

With that timeline, it’s possible Porter returns late in Missouri’s NBA season. But as an elite draft prospect stuck in a cartel system that caps his compensation well below market value, he should probably be cautious.

Porter will likely still go high in the draft – if his medicals check out. This is is a serious injury, and teams will be wary off long-term effects.

But he’s a top talent, and the forward shouldn’t slip far. In fact, in a strange way, this injury could even help him. There were questions about Porter’s ability to handle physicality and tight spaces when the game slows down, challenges he would have met frequently in college basketball. Now, scouts can’t pick apart those aspects of his game. Logically or not, NBA teams tend to favor the unknown in the draft, and Porter is on his way to being one of the biggest mysteries near the top of the 2018 draft.

Kevin Durant reverses course: Playing Thunder ‘just a regular game for me now’

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Kevin Durant said last season playing the Thunder is “never going to be a regular game for me.”

Now, the Warriors star, who’s questionable for tomorrow’s game in Oklahoma City, is singing a different tune.

Anthony Slater of The Athletic:

Durant:

Just a regular game for me now. I learned how to tune out the crowd. I learned how to tune out the bulls— and just play. Just keep at basketball, and I’ll be alright.

Durant is entitled to change his mind, and maybe that’s all that happened.

But this strikes me as yet another chasm between how Durant actually feels and how he wishes he felt – all while facing immense public scrutiny.

Durant spent eight years in Oklahoma City. Many of his former teammates, including Russell Westbrook, are still there. Durant might want to move on, but how could there not be a different feeling when playing the Thunder, especially in Oklahoma City?